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European GNSS Agency European GNSS Agency

zdroje zpráv:

EUSPA re-opens testing campaign for INAV improvements implementation

24.6.2022 10:35  
The present European GNSS (Galileo) Open Service Signal-In-Space Interface Control Document (OS SIS ICD) Issue 2.0 contains the publicly available information on the Galileo Signal-In-Space.
Published: 
24 June 2022

The European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is re-opening a testing campaign for INAV improvements implementation and hereby invites external stakeholders to express their interest in participating in such testing campaign. 

The testing will cover any of the three I/NAV improvements (SSP, FEC-2, RedCED), that will be tested in laboratory using simulated realistic scenarios, including open sky as well as impaired environments. The tests will allow the participants to have confirmation of the correct implementation of the OSSISICD 2.0. In case of specific interest, legacy receivers (e.g. not implementing I/NAV improvements) could be also tested, solely at the scope of confirming that they are not impacted anyhow by the introduction of the new I/NAV capabilities (backward compatibility is in any case guaranteed “by design” for any receiver that is fully compliant with the Galileo OS SIS ICD provisions, and referring in particular to section 4.1.2). 

The characteristics of the testing campaign are described here.

The interested participants may be invited to provide their product(s) before 1 August or 1 October to the premises indicated below according to the terms and conditions that will be communicated by the agency and be ready to provide any remote technical assistance needed during the testing as well as all the necessary interface documentation required for the testing. Any further detailed provision, including the possibility to provide the testing laboratories with ad-hoc receiver development platforms facilitating the testing activities, will be discussed with the interested participants.

The tests will be executed at the laboratories of the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy, and of the European Space Agency ESA/ESTEC in Noordwijk, The Netherlands. Each applicant will be assigned by EUSPA to any of the two laboratories depending on the specific conditions and availability.

Testing is currently foreseen to be done in three batches, starting on 1 August and 1 October 2022. The EUSPA reserves the right to change the scope, and timeline of the procedure.

Express your interest 

If you are interested in participating in the testing campaign above, please express your interest by sending an email before 15/07/2022, 17:00 (Prague local time) to the following email address: market@euspa.europa.eu. The subject of the email shall be “INAV improvements implementation testing campaign: 2nd call”.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The present European GNSS (Galileo) Open Service Signal-In-Space Interface Control Document (OS SIS ICD) Issue 2.0 contains the publicly available information on the Galileo Signal-In-Space.

The EUSPA Space Academy: Lift off to a successful space business!

20.6.2022 17:57  
EUSPA Space Academy offers free online training to space entrepreneurs
Published: 
21 June 2022

Tired of the nine-to-five grind? Spacing out at your desk while thinking of launching your own start-up? 

It’s time to stop dreaming, buckle up and get ready for lift off towards exciting opportunities in space!

The Space Academy, a new initiative by the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), is your ticket to creating ground-breaking new apps and disruptive business solutions using the power of the EU Space Programme.

This free online training is open to all individuals, start-ups, entrepreneurs and SMEs who want to learn the ins and outs of building a space application business. 

From innovative idea to successful space business 

Your training starts with a series of modules that can be followed using your own device and completed when and where you want. The modules are taught by top academics, industry leaders and EUSPA experts, all of whom bring real-world experience to your learning journey. 

By covering a specific topic or skill, these modules serve as building blocks for turning your innovative idea into a successful space business. Topics range from the technical details of the EU Space Programme and its various components to practical business skills such as:

Customer support and sales

Building a successful team

Resource allocation

Business plans and models

Access to funding

Intellectual Property, copyrights and data policy

And much, much more

Pick and choose which modules to follow and tailor your training to your own unique learning needs. Opportunities for Q&As, one-on-one sessions, additional workshops, personalised follow-ups and mentoring may also be available. Once you finish the training, you’ll receive an official certificate of completion from EUSPA.  

What are you waiting for? Subscribe to the EUSPA Space Academy today and then it’s 3, 2, 1 lift off to a successful space business! 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EUSPA Space Academy offers free online training to space entrepreneurs

Think you know EU Space?

15.6.2022 12:38  
Test your EU Space knowledge with our quiz
Published: 
17 June 2022

You read our news, follow us on Twitter and Instagram, watch our YouTube videos, download our publications, and subscribe to our weekly Watch This Space Newsletter. Maybe you’ve even attended an event or two. 

But does that make you ‘space smart’?

To find out, it’s time to put your EU Space knowledge to the test and take our online quiz!

There are 10 questions that cover everything from EGNOS, Galileo and Copernicus to market uptake and the forthcoming GOVSATCOM. Some might be a breeze, but others might leave you scratching your head. 

To help you out, we’ve created this cheat sheet, which you can use to go from being a space student to becoming a space ace. 

How many Galileo satellites are now in orbit?

There are currently 28 Galileo satellites in orbit. The most recent satellite to enter service is called Nikolina, named after one of the children who won the 2020 Galileo drawing competition. With satellites 29 and 30 set for launch later this year, Galileo will soon enter Full Operational Capability. 

What are EUSPA’s responsibilities?

Under our new mandate, which went into effect just over a year ago, EUSPA is responsible not only for implementing the EU Space Programme (and ensuring that EU citizens and companies benefit and make the best out of it) but also for the satellite service provision of Galileo and EGNOS and the security accreditation of the EU Space Programme. But even with our expanded mandate and new responsibilities, EUSPA’s mission remains the same: linking space to user needs.

How many airports across Europe use EGNOS today for safer, greener and less noisy landings?

EGNOS has revolutionised aviation – creating greater access to small and regional airports, increasing safety and facilitating more sustainable flight routes across Europe. Today, over 400 airports have implemented EGNOS-based approaches, including many small and regional airports that cannot afford the high cost of ground-based navigational systems. By increasing accessibility to regional airports, EGNOS-based procedures help decongest Europe’s busy airspace, especially around the major hub airports.

At what altitude do Galileo satellites orbit Earth?

While Galileo satellites may be orbiting 22,900 kilometres above us, their impact is felt right here on Earth. Whether you’re using a navigation device in your car or on your mobile phone, thanks to these satellites in space, you’ll always know your exact position. That same positioning and timing information is also used for everything from search and rescue missions to keeping the trains running on time.

What percentage of new tractors in Europe use EGNOS?

With EGNOS, European farmers can leverage the many benefits of precision agriculture, including cutting waste, saving time, reducing fatigue, optimising equipment and increasing crop yields. No wonder 97% of new tractors use EGNOS! 

Which facts and figures are true about EUSPA?

Just as the EU is diverse, so too is EUSPA. Today, we have 250 colleagues from 22 different nationalities. Our team is spread across 7 locations and 5 sites that stretch from our headquarters in Prague to our operational facilities in France, Spain, the Netherlands, Germany, Italy and Belgium. With plans to expand to around 300 staff by 2024, we’re always looking for new talent to join our team

What will GOVSATCOM offer?

As the fourth pillar of the EU Space Programme, GOVSATCOM will offer secure communication capabilities to security and safety critical missions managed by the EU and its Member States. EUSPA has been entrusted with the procurement of the secure operational ground segment, its operations and the coordination of the user-related aspects of GOVSATCOM, all in close collaboration with Member States and other involved entities.

Today, how many smartphones use Galileo worldwide?

Around the world, more than 3 billion smartphones rely on Galileo’s precise positioning information for a range of location-based services. This number will continue to grow, as all smartphones sold within the European single market are now required to be Galileo-enabled

Which component of the EU Space Programme allows us to monitor climate change?

From curbing CO2 emissions to fighting illegal logging and tracking biodiversity, Copernicus – Europe’s Earth Observation programme – is an essential tool for monitoring climate change and delivering on the Green Deal’s ambitious goals. 

According to the 2022 EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report, how much revenue did the GNSS and Earth Observation downstream market generate in 2021? 

Not only did the GNSS and EO downstream market generate over EUR 200 billion in revenue in 2021, but it’s set to reach almost half a trillion over the next decade. Add this up and what you have is a very lucrative investment opportunity.

A space ace

You now have all the information you need to ace our space quiz. Keep following our EUSPA channels to ensure your EU Space knowledge stays in top form! 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Test your EU Space knowledge with our quiz

New Fundamental Elements call kicks off with dedicated workshop

14.6.2022 10:31  
Attendees at the Fundamental Elements workshop will learn about the programme and hear about previous projects
Published: 
14 June 2022

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is set to launch a new Fundamental Elements call. To kick things off, they are hosting a dedicated online workshop on 30 June. The workshop is an opportunity to not only learn about the new call, but also hear from successful projects funded during the last call.

Fundamental Elements is an R&D funding mechanism designed to support the development of innovative chipset, antenna and receiver technologies that industry would not yet invest in on its own initiative. In doing so, the programme helps accelerate the integration of European GNSS (EGNSS) into market-ready devices and solutions.  

Projects funded by Fundamental Elements play a key role in EUSPA’s mission of driving the development and market uptake of Galileo-enabled receivers. For example, the GEARS project, which was funded during the initial call, developed a super accurate and highly robust Galileo-enabled receiver capable of providing both time and frequency data for critical infrastructure. 

GEARS, another project funded during the programme’s first call, developed an eCall and anti-theft system leveraging Galileo. The innovative device integrated the anti-theft and e-call Galileo based system into a small/medium-size scooter manageable by the user through a mobile application, battery duration, and the antenna performance in a stressed environment, due to the vibrations and potential accidents.

The new Fundamental Elements call builds on the success of projects like these by: 

Integrating Galileo’s key differentiators into receiver technologies, including OS-NMA, High Accuracy Frequency, triple frequency, Early Warning Service, CAS and ARAIM

Leveraging disruptive technologies such as machine learning and artificial intelligence

Exploring potential synergies with Copernicus and the forthcoming GovSatCom 

More details about these points and the call in general will be made available during EUSPA’s upcoming Fundamental Elements online Workshop via Webex. Scheduled for 30 June, the workshop will include in-depth information on the funding programme and the application process. The event will also feature a number of project teams funded during the first Fundamental Elements call, who will share their experiences, best practices and advice for putting together a successful project. See the agenda here.     

You can register for the workshop here

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Attendees at the Fundamental Elements workshop will learn about the programme and hear about previous projects

New Fundamental Elements call kicks off with dedicated workshop

14.6.2022 10:31  
Attendees at the Fundamental Elements workshop will learn about the programme and hear about previous projects
Published: 
14 June 2022

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is set to launch a new Fundamental Elements call. To kick things off, they are hosting a dedicated online workshop on 30 June. The workshop is an opportunity to not only learn about the new call, but also hear from successful projects funded during the last call.

Fundamental Elements is an R&D funding mechanism designed to support the development of innovative chipset, antenna and receiver technologies that industry would not yet invest in on its own initiative. In doing so, the programme helps accelerate the integration of European GNSS (EGNSS) into market-ready devices and solutions.  

Projects funded by Fundamental Elements play a key role in EUSPA’s mission of driving the development and market uptake of Galileo-enabled receivers. For example, the GEARS project, which was funded during the initial call, developed a super accurate and highly robust Galileo-enabled receiver capable of providing both time and frequency data for critical infrastructure. 

GEARS, another project funded during the programme’s first call, developed an eCall and anti-theft system leveraging Galileo. The innovative device integrated the anti-theft and e-call Galileo based system into a small/medium-size scooter manageable by the user through a mobile application, battery duration, and the antenna performance in a stressed environment, due to the vibrations and potential accidents.

The new Fundamental Elements call builds on the success of projects like these by: 

Integrating Galileo’s key differentiators into receiver technologies, including OS-NMA, High Accuracy Frequency, triple frequency, Early Warning Service, CAS and ARAIM

Leveraging disruptive technologies such as machine learning and artificial intelligence

Exploring potential synergies with Copernicus and the forthcoming GovSatCom 

More details about these points and the call in general will be made available during EUSPA’s upcoming Fundamental Elements online Workshop via Webex. Scheduled for 30 June, the workshop will include in-depth information on the funding programme and the application process. The event will also feature a number of project teams funded during the first Fundamental Elements call, who will share their experiences, best practices and advice for putting together a successful project.     

You can register for the workshop here

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Attendees at the Fundamental Elements workshop will learn about the programme and hear about previous projects

EU Space to keep Europe’s railways on track

10.6.2022 9:30  
The European rail sector is one step closer to leveraging GNSS as a safe source of positioning.
Published: 
10 June 2022

When it comes to making European rail safer, cleaner and more efficient, the EU Space Programme is nothing short of a gamechanger. As a case in point, look no further than the European Railway Traffic Management System (ERTMS). 

ERTMS aims to make rail transport safer and more competitive by replacing Europe’s different national train control and command systems with a single, coordinated and highly digital solution. To do this, it’s using European GNSS.

Not only does GNSS provide precise positioning and localisation, when augmented by EGNOS and possibly fused with other sensors, it has the potential to replace the expensive physical balises used to monitor train speed and streamline rail operations. 

GNSS’ potential becomes even greater when its positioning is complemented by Earth Observation. For example, railway operators can use Earth Observation data to monitor and prevent vegetation encroachment, landsides, and other risks that could endanger the safe operation of trains. 

With the goal of further advancing the safe use of GNSS as a source of positioning for trains, the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) has funded several research and development projects. One of those projects is CLUG, an initiative dedicated to developing a cost-efficient train tracking solution using EU satellite technology in conjunction with other sensors and data. 

Developing future train technology today

The CLUG project brought together experienced rail operators and infrastructure managers to define a set of specifications and operational scenarios capable of meeting the sector’s strict safety needs. The main outcome of this work is an interoperable, failsafe Train Localisation on Board Unit (TLOBU). 

The TLOBU uses measurements from a GNSS receiver and an EGNOS-enabled integrity algorithm, together with other technologies, such as an IMU and a digital map notably, to provide train and railway operators with such critical information as positioning and velocity. 

"It is within EUSPA’s long term strategy to ensure that EGNSS can support fail-safe train localization within ERTMS. CLUG consortium composed by many important railway undertakings and system integrators is contributing to this objective by developing Train Localization onboard unit, combining EGNSS with additional sensors to achieve the required localization performance in difficult railway environment," says Daniel Lopour, Market Development Officer for Rail and Logistics at EUSPA.

Read this: EGNOS and Galileo on the ambitious Digital Rail agenda (europa.eu)

“The idea is to move away from trackside-based train detection systems to onboard safe navigation systems using multi sensor fusion with EGNSS” said CLUG Project Coordinator Valentin Barreau, who made his remarks during the project’s Final Event on 9 June. 

“The absolute safe train positioning solution is oriented towards the needs of the future railway system. It will foster concepts such as intelligent traffic management, automated train operation (GoA2 to GoA4), ERTMS/ETCS Level 3 and it will decrease the cost of the ERTSM signalling system” by reducing the ground equipment used for safe train localisation, including axel counters, track circuits and, to some extent, physical balises.

Although the project itself is now finished, the CLUG team plans to continue developing its solution with the aim to include the necessary elements within the future evolution of the ERTMS technical specifications for interoperability.  

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The European rail sector is one step closer to leveraging GNSS as a safe source of positioning.

Pytheas Space Maritime Forum: educating the next generation EU seafarers and young professionals with the power of #EUSpace

8.6.2022 15:37  
The first Pytheas Maritime Space Forum is a 3 day summer camp open to EU students, seafarers and young professional between the ages of 20 and 30 with an interest in the shipping and/or space industries.
Published: 
08 June 2022

University is out, the weather is warm and the days are long – all signs that summer is finally here. But instead of spending the entire summer on the beach, why not travel to Athens and learn how the EU Space Programme is making the maritime sector smarter, safer and more sustainable?  

The first Pytheas Maritime Space Forum is a three-day summer camp open to EU students, seafarers and young professional between the ages of 20 and 30 with an interest in the shipping and/or space industries. Happening 15 – 17 July 2022, this is a one-of-a-kind opportunity to get an up-close understanding of how Galileo, Copernicus and EGNOS are redefining the shipping industry. 

The details 

Named after the Greek navigator, geographer, astronomer and explorer, the Pytheas Maritime Space Forum is organised by Isalos.net, a training initiative dedicated to connecting the shipping industry with the next generation of maritime professionals. 

Held within the framework of the 2022 European Year of Youth, the forum will provide students and young professionals from across the European Union with a platform for sharing their vision about the blue economy and the future of the maritime industry. The European Year of the Youth, an initiative of the European Union and the Directorate-General for Education, Youth, Sport and Culture, aims to highlight the important role that young Europeans play in building a greener, digital and more inclusive future.  

The Pytheas Maritime Space Forum is open to all EU citizens between 20 and 30 years old who are either studying or employed in the EU blue economy. To apply, please submit a letter of recommendation, a current CV and two brief essays.  

Students will be evaluated based on academic criteria by professors of the University of Aegean and Piraeus. Selected participants can expect a full three days of networking activities, informational sessions, hands-on workshops and on-site visits. Participation is free. Some students will be offered travel and accommodations costs

This forum will be an excellent opportunity to connect with fellow young professionals and underscores the essential roles that space-based technology and EUSPA play in driving a safer and more sustainable maritime industry.

EUSPA is happy to be contributing its expertise and knowledge in the fields of satellite navigation and Earth Observation to the forum’s agenda, which includes such topics as: 

Transformation of Shipping: emerging technologies in navigation and telecommunication

Space and the Sea: towards greener maritime operations

Safety and Security at sea enabled by the EU Space Programme.  

You can learn more about the forum here, or click here to start the application process. The deadline for applying is 15 June 2022.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The first Pytheas Maritime Space Forum is a 3 day summer camp open to EU students, seafarers and young professional between the ages of 20 and 30 with an interest in the shipping and/or space industries.

Pytheas Space Maritime Forum: educating the next generation EU seafarers and young professionals with the power of #EUSpace

8.6.2022 15:37  
The first Pytheas Maritime Space Forum is a 3 day summer camp open to EU students, seafarers and young professional between the ages of 20 and 30 with an interest in the shipping and/or space industries.
Published: 
08 June 2022

University is out, the weather is warm and the days are long – all signs that summer is finally here. But instead of spending the entire summer on the beach, why not travel to Athens and learn how the EU Space Programme is making the maritime sector smarter, safer and more sustainable?  

The first Pytheas Maritime Space Forum is a three-day summer camp open to EU students, seafarers and young professionals between the ages of 20 and 30 with an interest in the shipping and/or space industries. Happening 15 – 17 July 2022, this is a one-of-a-kind opportunity to get an up-close understanding of how Galileo, Copernicus and EGNOS are redefining the shipping industry. 

The details 

Named after the Greek navigator, geographer, astronomer and explorer, the Pytheas Maritime Space Forum is organised by Isalos.net, a training initiative dedicated to connecting the shipping industry with the next generation of maritime professionals. 

Held within the framework of the 2022 European Year of Youth, the forum will provide students and young professionals from across the European Union with a platform for sharing their vision about the blue economy and the future of the maritime industry. The European Year of the Youth, an initiative of the European Union and the Directorate-General for Education, Youth, Sport and Culture, aims to highlight the important role that young Europeans play in building a greener, digital and more inclusive future.  

The Pytheas Maritime Space Forum is open to all EU citizens between 20 and 30 years old who are either studying or employed in the EU blue economy. To apply, please submit a letter of recommendation, a current CV and two brief essays.  

Students will be evaluated based on academic criteria by professors of the University of Aegean and Piraeus. Selected participants can expect a full three days of networking activities, informational sessions, hands-on workshops and on-site visits. Participation is free. Some students will be offered travel and accommodations costs

This forum will be an excellent opportunity to connect with fellow young professionals and underscores the essential roles that space-based technology and EUSPA play in driving a safer and more sustainable maritime industry.

EUSPA is happy to be contributing its expertise and knowledge in the fields of satellite navigation and Earth Observation to the forum’s agenda, which includes such topics as: 

Transformation of Shipping: emerging technologies in navigation and telecommunication

Space and the Sea: towards greener maritime operations

Safety and Security at sea enabled by the EU Space Programme.  

You can learn more about the forum here, or click here to start the application process. The deadline for applying is 24 June 2022.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The first Pytheas Maritime Space Forum is a 3 day summer camp open to EU students, seafarers and young professional between the ages of 20 and 30 with an interest in the shipping and/or space industries.

Galileo OSNMA Workshop: testing insights and upcoming opportunities

7.6.2022 11:05  
To contribute to the detection of certain types of data-level GNSS attacks, EUSPA and the European Commission are currently testing the Galileo Open Service – Navigation Message Authentication (OSNMA)
Published: 
07 June 2022

The Galileo OSNMA Public Observation Test Phase is ongoing and has successfully gathered GNSS manufacturers, integrators and application developers to test this new authentication mechanism. Participants have been able to test OSNMA via Signal in Space (SiS) with a free choice of scenarios depending on their target use cases and assess the service’s performance. EUSPA values the feedback of testers and will leverage the knowledge gained during this phase to enhance the functionality in preparation for its service declaration. 

As mentioned during the Galileo OSNMA Public Observation Webinar held on 2nd February 2022, opportunities are designed throughout the testing phase for participants to discuss their test results with EUSPA experts and gain visibility for their OSNMA tested solutions. In this context, the Agency is organising the first Galileo OSNMA Public Observation Workshop to take place online on the 28th June 2022. You can find the agenda here. EUSPA experts will present an overview of the status of the testing phase, selected participants will discuss preliminary test results and market stakeholders will introduce their perspective on OSNMA added value for specific use cases. 

Participants will also have the opportunity to learn more about additional activities involving OSNMA. The European Commission Joint Research Centre (JRC) will present more details on the testing of scenarios not accessible via SiS, while the Institute of Electric and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) will showcase the role of OSNMA in the development of standards for a resilient position, navigation and time (PNT).

To attend this Workshop, please register here.

The registration will be open until June 26th. 

Relevant interested parties can still register for the Public Observation Test Phase by accessing the OSNMA Public Observation Webpage.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

To contribute to the detection of certain types of data-level GNSS attacks, EUSPA and the European Commission are currently testing the Galileo Open Service – Navigation Message Authentication (OSNMA)

Galileo OSNMA Workshop: testing insights and upcoming opportunities

7.6.2022 11:05  
To contribute to the detection of certain types of data-level GNSS attacks, EUSPA and the European Commission are currently testing the Galileo Open Service – Navigation Message Authentication (OSNMA)
Published: 
07 June 2022

The Galileo OSNMA Public Observation Test Phase is ongoing and has successfully gathered GNSS manufacturers, integrators and application developers to test this new authentication mechanism. Participants have been able to test OSNMA via Signal in Space (SiS) with a free choice of scenarios depending on their target use cases and assess the service’s performance. EUSPA values the feedback of testers and will leverage the knowledge gained during this phase to enhance the functionality in preparation for its service declaration. 

As mentioned during the Galileo OSNMA Public Observation Webinar held on 2nd February 2022, opportunities are designed throughout the testing phase for participants to discuss their test results with EUSPA experts and gain visibility for their OSNMA tested solutions. In this context, the Agency is organising the first Galileo OSNMA Public Observation Workshop to take place online on the 28th June 2022. You can find the agenda here. EUSPA experts will present an overview of the status of the testing phase, selected participants will discuss preliminary test results and market stakeholders will introduce their perspective on OSNMA added value for specific use cases. 

Participants will also have the opportunity to learn more about additional activities involving OSNMA. The European Commission Joint Research Centre (JRC) will present more details on the testing of scenarios not accessible via SiS, while the Institute of Electric and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) will showcase the role of OSNMA in the development of standards for a resilient position, navigation and time (PNT).

To attend this Workshop, please register here.

The registration will be open until June 26th. 

Relevant interested parties can still register for the Public Observation Test Phase by accessing the OSNMA Public Observation Webpage.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

To contribute to the detection of certain types of data-level GNSS attacks, EUSPA and the European Commission are currently testing the Galileo Open Service – Navigation Message Authentication (OSNMA)

Galileo OSNMA Workshop: testing insights and upcoming opportunities

7.6.2022 11:05  
To contribute to the detection of certain types of data-level GNSS attacks, EUSPA and the European Commission are currently testing the Galileo Open Service – Navigation Message Authentication (OSNMA)
Published: 
07 June 2022

The Galileo OSNMA Public Observation Test Phase is ongoing and has successfully gathered GNSS manufacturers, integrators and application developers to test this new authentication mechanism. Participants have been able to test OSNMA via Signal in Space (SiS) with a free choice of scenarios depending on their target use cases and assess the service’s performance. EUSPA values the feedback of testers and will leverage the knowledge gained during this phase to enhance the functionality in preparation for its service declaration. 

As mentioned during the Galileo OSNMA Public Observation Webinar held on 2nd February 2022, opportunities are designed throughout the testing phase for participants to discuss their test results with EUSPA experts and gain visibility for their OSNMA tested solutions. In this context, the Agency is organising the first Galileo OSNMA Public Observation Workshop to take place online on the 28th June 2022. You can find the agenda here. EUSPA experts will present an overview of the status of the testing phase, selected participants will discuss preliminary test results and market stakeholders will introduce their perspective on OSNMA added value for specific use cases. 

Participants will also have the opportunity to learn more about additional activities involving OSNMA. The European Commission Joint Research Centre (JRC) will present more details on the testing of scenarios not accessible via SiS, while the Institute of Electric and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) will showcase the role of OSNMA in the development of standards for a resilient position, navigation and time (PNT).

To attend this Workshop, please register here.

The registration will be open until June 26th. 

Relevant interested parties can still register for the Public Observation Test Phase by accessing the OSNMA Public Observation Webpage.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

To contribute to the detection of certain types of data-level GNSS attacks, EUSPA and the European Commission are currently testing the Galileo Open Service – Navigation Message Authentication (OSNMA)

EGNOS makes flying sustainably ‘easy’

3.6.2022 14:32  
A320neo with Pratt and Whtney engines is certified
Published: 
03 June 2022

EGNOS, the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service, has revolutionised the way we fly: creating greater access to small and regional airports, increasing safety and facilitating more sustainable flight routes across Europe. 

“From the commercial, regional, general and business aviation sectors to original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), airports and the end user – everyone benefits from EGNOS,” says Jean-Marc Piéplu,  Head of EGNOS Services Department at the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA).

With news that Airbus has delivered the first EGNOS-enabled A320neo to the popular low-cost airline EasyJet, soon even more passengers will be flying with EGNOS. The A320neo is the world’s most popular aircraft family for short-haul flights, claiming the greatest number of aircraft sold and delivered. 

Accurate guidance for safer landings

As an alternative to ground-based Instrument Landing System (ILS) navigational aids, EGNOS-enabled approaches, often referred to as localiser performance with vertical guidance (LPV), utilise geostationary satellites and a network of ground stations to receive, analyse and augment GNSS signals. In doing so, it enables aircraft approaches that are operationally equivalent to ILS CAT I, providing lateral and vertical guidance without the need for visual contact with the ground until a decision height of only 200 feet above the runway as minimum. 

In addition to providing pilots with accurate guidance for safer landings (even in poor weather conditions), EGNOS is also more cost effective to install, maintain and operate than equivalent ground-based systems. This makes EGNOS particularly attractive to Europe’s many small and regional airports that simply cannot afford the high cost of ILS. 

“Having the ability to cost-effectively offer accurate vertical guidance makes these airports safer and more attractive to short-haul flights,” explains Piéplu “Moreover, EGNOS based procedures are mandatory in all instrument runways by 2024, and will be the main means for CAT-I by 2030 in EU.” 

Towards a more sustainable aviation sector 

Not only are these EGNOS-enabled approaches safer, they’re also more sustainable. “Having LPV in all airports give more choices for alternate airports, which means that the distance to be flown could be shorter, and results in less fuel being burned and more emissions being released,” adds Carmen Aguilera, Operational Market Development Officer at EUSPA. “EGNOS approaches, as enabler of PBN, allows shorter trajectories with respect to conventional approaches, which is more fuel efficient.”

Thanks to its lower decision height, EGNOS can help pilots better evaluate visibility conditions, which in many cases means avoiding the need to circle or divert – two manoeuvres that burn a lot of fuel. “Minimising diversions and aborted landings mean less fuel consumption, a win-win for both the environment and the airlines,” concludes Aguilera. 

EGNOS services are delivered by the EGNOS service provider (ESSP) under a contract with EUSPA.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

A320neo with Pratt and Whtney engines is certified

EGNOS makes flying sustainably ‘easy’

3.6.2022 14:32  
A320neo with Pratt and Whtney engines is certified
Published: 
03 June 2022

EGNOS, the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service, has revolutionised the way we fly: creating greater access to small and regional airports, increasing safety and facilitating more sustainable flight routes across Europe. 

“From the commercial, regional, general and business aviation sectors to original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), airports and the end user – everyone benefits from EGNOS,” says Jean-Marc Piéplu,  Head of EGNOS Services Department at the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA).

With news that Airbus has delivered the first EGNOS-enabled A320neo to the popular low-cost airline EasyJet, soon even more passengers will be flying with EGNOS. The A320neo is the world’s most popular aircraft family for short-haul flights, claiming the greatest number of aircraft sold and delivered. 

Accurate guidance for safer landings

As an alternative to ground-based Instrument Landing System (ILS) navigational aids, EGNOS-enabled approaches, often referred to as localiser performance with vertical guidance (LPV), utilise geostationary satellites and a network of ground stations to receive, analyse and augment GNSS signals. In doing so, it enables aircraft approaches that are operationally equivalent to ILS CAT I, providing lateral and vertical guidance without the need for visual contact with the ground until a decision height of only 200 feet above the runway as minimum. 

In addition to providing pilots with accurate guidance for safer landings (even in poor weather conditions), EGNOS is also more cost effective to install, maintain and operate than equivalent ground-based systems. This makes EGNOS particularly attractive to Europe’s many small and regional airports that simply cannot afford the high cost of ILS. 

“Having the ability to cost-effectively offer accurate vertical guidance makes these airports safer and more attractive to short-haul flights,” explains Piéplu “Moreover, EGNOS based procedures are mandatory in all instrument runways by 2024, and will be the main means for CAT-I by 2030 in EU.” 

Towards a more sustainable aviation sector 

Not only are these EGNOS-enabled approaches safer, they’re also more sustainable. “Having LPV in all airports give more choices for alternate airports, which means that the distance to be flown could be shorter, and results in less fuel being burned and more emissions being released,” adds Carmen Aguilera, Operational Market Development Officer at EUSPA. “EGNOS approaches, as enabler of PBN, allows shorter trajectories with respect to conventional approaches, which is more fuel efficient.”

Thanks to its lower decision height, EGNOS can help pilots better evaluate visibility conditions, which in many cases means avoiding the need to circle or divert – two manoeuvres that burn a lot of fuel. “Minimising diversions and aborted landings mean less fuel consumption, a win-win for both the environment and the airlines,” concludes Aguilera. 

EGNOS services are delivered by the EGNOS service provider (ESSP) under a contract with EUSPA.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

A320neo with Pratt and Whtney engines is certified

Watch out - exciting disruption is happening ahead! #myEUspace winners announced

2.6.2022 13:10  
#myEUspace competition winners on Entrepreneurship Day at EUSPA
Published: 
02 June 2022

Farming by smartphone. Creating artistic, personalised products using satellite imagery. Building a better back nine from space. And monitoring road safety issues without a human in sight. 

These aren’t clips from some sci-fi future. It’s all happening now – thanks to EU Space and 11 very innovative European start-ups.

The start-ups are the winners of the #myEUspace competition, a EUSPA initiative supporting the development of innovative commercial applications that leverage data coming from the EU Space Programme

Launched in September 2021 as part of the European Commission’s CASSINI Space Entrepreneurship Initiative and with over EUR 1 million in prize money on the line, #myEUspace is one of the biggest competitions ever organised by EUSPA. 

And the winners are…

Following an intense nine-week process of fine-tuning prototypes and products, refining business plans and making final pitches to a scrutinising panel of judges, the competition’s winners were announced at EUSPA’s Entrepreneurship Day. 

While the selected solutions cover such diverse sectors as location-based services, smart mobility, geomatics and precision agriculture, they all share a foundation in their use of data coming from Galileo, Copernicus or a synergistic combination of the two.

So, without further ado, let us introduce to you 11 of Europe’s hottest, most disruptive space-based start-ups:

Track 1:

SANGENE: integrated GNSS-based passive radar for the detection and first localisation of obstacles.

EO4ART: web application for artistic and personalised products based on satellite images acquired over a specific region of interest.

ALTIWAVE: satellite-derived regional wave heights for the marine energy sector.

Master Map: automatic road mapping status for maintenance optimisation.

VirtualCrop: application for sustainable precision farming that turns phones into data gathering and analysis tools.

RIGOROUS: efficient and effective development and deployment of solutions based on using Randomness-Intensive algorithms for near-real-time route optimisation.

Track 2:

C-ITS Platform: increased road safety, powered by Galileo and Copernicus.

E20.Green: intelligent platform powered by GNSS, AI, EO and IoT that enables golf courses and urban green spaces to effectively manage their assets, operations and land.

SPAI: solution to easily integrate satellite analytics into the work practices of expert and non-expert users, effortlessly extracting the value of EO using AI.

SOILSPECT: automatic monitoring of ground settlement happening at construction sites.  

Agricircle: dashboard for monitoring the outcome of regenerative agriculture initiatives.

Defining the future today 

While the competition may be over, for these 11 start-ups, the work is just beginning. Armed with up to EUR 50,000 in prize money and ready access to additional sources of financing, mentoring and incubation, the winners will now work to further develop their products and services and move them towards commercialisation.

"Space data and services are driving innovation and enabling disruptive technologies in a wide range of sectors", says EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa. "Start-ups have been particularly enthusiastic in embracing the potential offered by the EU Space Programme. I would like to congratulate the winners and also the participants for the effort they put."

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

#myEUspace competition winners on Entrepreneurship Day at EUSPA

Watch out - exciting disruption is happening ahead! #myEUspace winners announced

2.6.2022 13:10  
#myEUspace competition winners on Entrepreneurship Day at EUSPA
Published: 
02 June 2022

Farming by smartphone. Creating artistic, personalised products using satellite imagery. Building a better back nine from space. And monitoring road safety issues without a human in sight. 

These aren’t clips from some sci-fi future. It’s all happening now – thanks to EU Space and 11 very innovative European start-ups.

The start-ups are the winners of the #myEUspace competition, a EUSPA initiative supporting the development of innovative commercial applications that leverage data coming from the EU Space Programme

Launched in September 2021 as part of the European Commission’s CASSINI Space Entrepreneurship Initiative and with over EUR 1 million in prize money on the line, #myEUspace is one of the biggest competitions ever organised by EUSPA. 

And the winners are…

Following an intense nine-week process of fine-tuning prototypes and products, refining business plans and making final pitches to a scrutinising panel of judges, the competition’s winners were announced at EUSPA’s Entrepreneurship Day. 

While the selected solutions cover such diverse sectors as location-based services, smart mobility, geomatics and precision agriculture, they all share a foundation in their use of data coming from Galileo, Copernicus or a synergistic combination of the two.

So, without further ado, let us introduce to you 11 of Europe’s hottest, most disruptive space-based start-ups:

Track 1:

SANGENE: integrated GNSS-based passive radar for the detection and first localisation of obstacles.

EO4ART: web application for artistic and personalised products based on satellite images acquired over a specific region of interest.

ALTIWAVE: satellite-derived regional wave heights for the marine energy sector.

Master Map: automatic road mapping status for maintenance optimisation.

VirtualCrop: application for sustainable precision farming that turns phones into data gathering and analysis tools.

RIGOROUS: efficient and effective development and deployment of solutions based on using Randomness-Intensive algorithms for near-real-time route optimisation.

Track 2:

C-ITS Platform: increased road safety, powered by Galileo and Copernicus.

E20.Green: intelligent platform powered by GNSS, AI, EO and IoT that enables golf courses and urban green spaces to effectively manage their assets, operations and land.

SPAI: solution to easily integrate satellite analytics into the work practices of expert and non-expert users, effortlessly extracting the value of EO using AI.

SOILSPECT: automatic monitoring of ground settlement happening at construction sites.  

Agricircle: dashboard for monitoring the outcome of regenerative agriculture initiatives.

Defining the future today 

While the competition may be over, for these 11 start-ups, the work is just beginning. Armed with up to EUR 50,000 in prize money and ready access to additional sources of financing, mentoring and incubation, the winners will now work to further develop their products and services and move them towards commercialisation.

"Space data and services are driving innovation and enabling disruptive technologies in a wide range of sectors", says EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa. "Start-ups have been particularly enthusiastic in embracing the potential offered by the EU Space Programme. I would like to congratulate the winners and also the participants for the effort they put."

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

#myEUspace competition winners on Entrepreneurship Day at EUSPA

Help us improve the EUSPA user experience

30.5.2022 12:02  
Help us improve the EUSPA user experience
Published: 
30 May 2022

EUSPA is revamping its online presence – and we need your help! Take part in our study and let us know how we can build a better website user experience for you.

When the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) was launched in May 2021, it represented the start of a new era for EU Space. With an expanded mandate and new responsibilities, EUSPA has remained committed to helping the EU, its citizens and its businesses maximise the many social and economic benefits offered by the EU Space Programme.

Part of this commitment means making sure you can easily access the EU Space information you need when and where you need it – and that starts with our website. To build a better user experience, we have created a study in two parts to find out what you want to see and how you want to see it. Take our short online survey and participate in our tree testing study to provide us with your valuable insights. Read on to learn more.

An evolving space programme and organisation

Today, the EU Space Programme consists of:

Read more: GOVSATCOM adds secure governmental communications to the EU Space Programme

Together, these core components enable a wide range of critical services and everyday applications, making the EU Space Programme indispensable to the lives of Europeans.

The EU Space Programme also provides essential infrastructure that gives the European economy an important competitive edge and plays a key role in Europe’s digital transformation. Copernicus, as the number one world provider of space data and information, coupled with Galileo’s impressive 20 cm accuracy, means that EU space technology and data are a major enabler in the GNSS and Earth Observation downstream market. A market, that on a global scale, is expected to reach almost EUR 500 billion in revenue over the next decade.

With so much growth on the horizon, in addition to managing an increasing workload, promoting innovative downstream applications, scaling the market share of EGNSS and Copernicus and creating new synergies across the EU Space Programme requires that EUSPA, as an organisation, evolve. That is why we are currently in the process of establishing ourselves as a matrix organisation. By streamlining our operations and maximising efficiency, this change in structure will allow us to better meet our expanded mandate and growing responsibilities.

We need your help!

Even with its expanded mandate, new responsibilities and an updated organisational structure, EUSPA’s mission remains the same: linking space to user needs. To ensure we continue to meet that mission, we need your support.

You can help us improve our website to better serve your needs in two ways:

  1. By taking our short survey, you will ensure that we are providing the type of information and content you are looking for when you visit the EUSPA site. Your input will be used to tailor the type of online content we provide.
  2. Our tree testing study, which should take no more than 10 minutes of your time, will help us better understand how you navigate our site and how easily you can find the information you are looking for. We’ll use your input to design an enhanced user experience for our online presence.

Because we want to gather input from as many different users as possible, we also ask that you share our survey within your own network. Simply copy and paste this link (https://bit.ly/3sRBhlM) into your preferred social media channels, email and messaging apps.

Together, we can make the link between space and users even stronger!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Help us improve the EUSPA user experience

EU Space is the key to disaster risk management and response

27.5.2022 15:59  
EUSPA's Executive Director at Disaster Risk Management Workshop in Athens, Greece
Published: 
27 May 2022

When it comes to weather-related events, 2021 was a record-breaking year for Europe. The summer the hottest on record – with a part of Sicily setting a provisional heat record for Europe at 48.8 degrees Celsius in August – translating into a very dry Mediterranean region. This extreme heatwave ignited wildfires across countries like Greece and Italy. According to the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT), these fires overwhelmed firefighters, forced people to evacuate their homes and left at least 86 dead. By the end, 2021 was the second worst year ever for forest fires in the Mediterranean. But it wasn’t just southern Europe that suffered. Up north, parts of Germany, Belgium and some surrounding countries were inundated by record-breaking rains and deadly flooding. 

“Satellite technologies have proven invaluable in addressing emergencies, with an enormous potential to further contribute to effective response and adequate recovery” said Minister for Climate Crisis  and Protection in his opening remarks  at the Satellite-based Services for Disaster Risk Management Workshop organised in Athens, Greece. ‘’ EU programmes like Copernicus and Galileo help us build an efficient disaster risk management cycle - prevent and prepare, respond, and recover” he concluded.

EUSPA's Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa with Greece's Minister for the Climate Crisis and Civil Protection Christos Stylianides

“Last summer was a case study in the importance of having innovative tools and solutions for effective disaster risk management and response,” said Rodrigo da Costa, Executive Director of the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA). “The key to building these potentially life-saving tools and solutions is the EU Space Programme.”

According to da Costa, each component of the EU Space Programme brings added value to different phases of the disaster risk management and mitigation chain. For example, the Copernicus EMS service provides on-demand, detailed information for selected emergency situations, including fires and flooding. 

The service also offers continuous observations and forecasting for flood, drought and fire risks, providing decision makers with the critical geospatial information they need to, for example, issue an evacuation order or early warning alert. 

The power of synergy 

Although Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus each offer emergency responders with a unique tool set, EU Space offers even more benefits when used in synergy. 

“When the Greek central region of Thessaly has been affected by floods in 2020 trapping hundreds of people and rendered transportation and communication infrastructure useless, satellite communication, working in synergy with Copernicus (CEMS activation) and European GNSS (EGNSS), provided rescue teams with the spatial awareness, connectivity and highly accurate positioning and navigation they needed to save lives,” da Costa told the Hellenic Parliament in Greece. 

As part of his visit to Athens, da Costa addressed the Parliament’s Special Permanent Committee on Environmental Protection during a dedicated discussion on using the EU Space Programme to prevent and respond to natural disasters.

This synergy between GNSS and Earth Observation is particularly beneficial to drone operations, which emergency response teams use for everything from inspecting flooded areas to post-earthquake search and rescue operations and monitoring remote wildfires. 

As to the later, firefighting teams are replacing traditional ground-based systems supported by manned aircraft with more cost-effective drones. Equipped with a wide-range of sensors for capturing Earth Observation data and navigated using GNSS positioning, advanced drones can now provide firefighters with another layer of information – and protection.    

Secure satellite communications for security and safety-critical missions 

But what happens when a disaster occurs where there are no ground stations, either because they were destroyed, such as during an earthquake, or because they never existed in the first place? Or what if the end users require secure communication? 

For emergency situations like these, there’s GOVSATCOM.

As the fourth pillar of the EU Space Programme, GOVSATCOM will provide secure, cost-efficient communication capabilities to security and safety-critical missions, operations and infrastructure. Its users will include border and maritime authorities, law enforcement agencies, civil protection forces, search and rescue services, disaster relief and humanitarian missions, authorised infrastructure operators and military forces. 

 

By working in synergy with Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus, GOVSATCOM will further enhance the EU Space Programme’s ability to keep European citizens safe and secure.  While Copernicus and EGNSS provide the necessary data and positioning, some security incidents also require a means of communication that is robustly protected against interference, interception, intrusion and other risks. GOVSATCOM bridges this gap between the need for assured and secure communication and the capabilities already offered by Copernicus, Galileo and EGNOS.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EUSPA's Executive Director at Disaster Risk Management Workshop in Athens, Greece

Entrepreneurship Day a not-to-be-missed event for start-ups, scale-ups, innovators and investors

25.5.2022 11:43  
Entrepreneurship Day a not-to-be-missed event for start-ups, scale-ups, innovators and investors
Published: 
25 May 2022

If you’re a European start-up, scale-up, SME, entrepreneur, innovator or investor and aren’t taking advantage of the EU Space Programme then listen up: you’re missing out on a big opportunity.

Just how big are we talking?

According to research conducted by the experts at the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), the GNSS and Earth Observation downstream market generated over EUR 200 billion in revenue in 2021. What’s more, this market is expected to hit the half trillion mark over the next decade.

Now that we have your attention, it’s time to take out your calendar and circle 1 June. That’s the day EUSPA will provide all the information and insight you need to successfully integrate European space solutions into your business idea, start-up or innovation.

Taking place at EUSPA Headquarters in Prague, Entrepreneurship Day is a chance to learn about the EU Space Programme and how EUSPA supports those looking to innovate and invest using European GNSS and Earth Observation. It’s also an opportunity to get a first-hand look at how innovative space-based solutions are delivering cutting-edge, often industry-defining services across a range of application areas – many of which will be exhibiting during the event as part of the #myEUspace competition.

Bringing space-solutions onto the European market

Organised by EUSPA as part of the European Commission’s CASSINI - Space Entrepreneurship Initiative, the #myEUspace competition has committed EUR 1 million in prize money to bring disruptive, space-based solutions onto the European market. The accelerated start-ups developed a range of novel solutions, new technologies, mobile apps and hardware. While each solution covers a different sector, including location-based services, smart mobility, geomatics and smart agriculture, they all share a foundation in their use of data coming from Galileo and/or Copernicus

“Space data is at the heart of the technological revolution currently sweeping Europe, and this competition is another example of how EUSPA supports innovative entrepreneurs, start-ups and SMEs from across the EU who are leveraging Copernicus and Galileo data, information and services,” says Fiammetta Diani, EUSPA Head of Market, Downstream and Innovation. 

Nearly 40 EU start-ups will be on hand at Entrepreneurship Day to share how their space-based innovations support the EU’s strategic agenda. The start-ups will also provide live demonstrations as part of their final pitch to judges, who will announce the winners of the #myEUspace competition at the end of the day.    

Information for fund managers and investors too

Entrepreneurship Day will also host the latest edition of our Capacity Building for Fund Managers series

Organised by EUSPA, in collaboration with the European Commission, European Space Agency (ESA) and European Investment Fund (EIF), this series of five workshops is designed to provide venture capitalists, fund managers and other investors with the in-depth information they need to make smart, informed investment decisions. 

“If you want to become an active investor in this exciting field or simply want to gather more information before deciding to raise a new fund, then this capacity building programme is for you,” adds Diani.

The workshop will be held live during Entrepreneurship Day, as well as online. 

A focus on start-ups 

On top of the start-up showcase, the #myEUspace competition and the Capacity Building workshop, the Entrepreneurship Day agenda  will feature panel discussions on how to grow a start-up and best practices in start-up investment. 

“Because of their agility and unique ability to adjust to new business models and adapt to new technologies, start-ups are particularly well-positioned to leverage the potential offered by the EU Space Programme,” notes Diani. 

The day also includes dedicated time for business matchmaking and of course plenty of opportunities for networking.

Join us virtually for the afternoon sessions by tuning in here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Entrepreneurship Day happening June 1st at EUSPA headquarters in Prague

Entrepreneurship Day a not-to-be-missed event for start-ups, scale-ups, innovators and investors

25.5.2022 11:43  
Entrepreneurship Day a not-to-be-missed event for start-ups, scale-ups, innovators and investors
Published: 
25 May 2022

If you’re a European start-up, scale-up, SME, entrepreneur, innovator or investor and aren’t taking advantage of the EU Space Programme then listen up: you’re missing out on a big opportunity.

Just how big are we talking?

According to research conducted by the experts at the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), the GNSS and Earth Observation downstream market generated over EUR 200 billion in revenue in 2021. What’s more, this market is expected to hit the half trillion mark over the next decade.

Now that we have your attention, it’s time to take out your calendar and circle 1 June. That’s the day EUSPA will provide all the information and insight you need to successfully integrate European space solutions into your business idea, start-up or innovation.

Taking place at EUSPA Headquarters in Prague, Entrepreneurship Day is a chance to learn about the EU Space Programme and how EUSPA supports those looking to innovate and invest using European GNSS and Earth Observation. It’s also an opportunity to get a first-hand look at how innovative space-based solutions are delivering cutting-edge, often industry-defining services across a range of application areas – many of which will be exhibiting during the event as part of the #myEUspace competition.

Bringing space-solutions onto the European market

Organised by EUSPA as part of the European Commission’s CASSINI - Space Entrepreneurship Initiative, the #myEUspace competition has committed EUR 1 million in prize money to bring disruptive, space-based solutions onto the European market. The accelerated start-ups developed a range of novel solutions, new technologies, mobile apps and hardware. While each solution covers a different sector, including location-based services, smart mobility, geomatics and smart agriculture, they all share a foundation in their use of data coming from Galileo and/or Copernicus

“Space data is at the heart of the technological revolution currently sweeping Europe, and this competition is another example of how EUSPA supports innovative entrepreneurs, start-ups and SMEs from across the EU who are leveraging Copernicus and Galileo data, information and services,” says Fiammetta Diani, EUSPA Head of Market, Downstream and Innovation. 

Nearly 40 EU start-ups will be on hand at Entrepreneurship Day to share how their space-based innovations support the EU’s strategic agenda. The start-ups will also provide live demonstrations as part of their final pitch to judges, who will announce the winners of the #myEUspace competition at the end of the day.    

Information for fund managers and investors too

Entrepreneurship Day will also host the latest edition of our Capacity Building for Fund Managers series

Organised by EUSPA, in collaboration with the European Commission, European Space Agency (ESA) and European Investment Fund (EIF), this series of five workshops is designed to provide venture capitalists, fund managers and other investors with the in-depth information they need to make smart, informed investment decisions. 

“If you want to become an active investor in this exciting field or simply want to gather more information before deciding to raise a new fund, then this capacity building programme is for you,” adds Diani.

The workshop will be held live during Entrepreneurship Day, as well as online. 

A focus on start-ups 

On top of the start-up showcase, the #myEUspace competition and the Capacity Building workshop, the Entrepreneurship Day agenda  will feature panel discussions on how to grow a start-up and best practices in start-up investment. 

“Because of their agility and unique ability to adjust to new business models and adapt to new technologies, start-ups are particularly well-positioned to leverage the potential offered by the EU Space Programme,” notes Diani. 

The day also includes dedicated time for business matchmaking and of course plenty of opportunities for networking.

Join us virtually for the afternoon sessions by tuning in here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Entrepreneurship Day happening June 1st at EUSPA headquarters in Prague

Entrepreneurship Day a not-to-be-missed event for start-ups, scale-ups, innovators and investors

25.5.2022 11:43  
Entrepreneurship Day a not-to-be-missed event for start-ups, scale-ups, innovators and investors
Published: 
25 May 2022

If you’re a European start-up, scale-up, SME, entrepreneur, innovator or investor and aren’t taking advantage of the EU Space Programme then listen up: you’re missing out on a big opportunity.

Just how big are we talking?

According to research conducted by the experts at the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), the GNSS and Earth Observation downstream market generated over EUR 200 billion in revenue in 2021. What’s more, this market is expected to hit the half trillion mark over the next decade.

Now that we have your attention, it’s time to take out your calendar and circle 1 June. That’s the day EUSPA will provide all the information and insight you need to successfully integrate European space solutions into your business idea, start-up or innovation.

Taking place at EUSPA Headquarters in Prague, Entrepreneurship Day is a chance to learn about the EU Space Programme and how EUSPA supports those looking to innovate and invest using European GNSS and Earth Observation. It’s also an opportunity to get a first-hand look at how innovative space-based solutions are delivering cutting-edge, often industry-defining services across a range of application areas – many of which will be exhibiting during the event as part of the #myEUspace competition.

Bringing space-solutions onto the European market

Organised by EUSPA as part of the European Commission’s CASSINI - Space Entrepreneurship Initiative, the #myEUspace competition has committed EUR 1 million in prize money to bring disruptive, space-based solutions onto the European market. The accelerated start-ups developed a range of novel solutions, new technologies, mobile apps and hardware. While each solution covers a different sector, including location-based services, smart mobility, geomatics and smart agriculture, they all share a foundation in their use of data coming from Galileo and/or Copernicus

“Space data is at the heart of the technological revolution currently sweeping Europe, and this competition is another example of how EUSPA supports innovative entrepreneurs, start-ups and SMEs from across the EU who are leveraging Copernicus and Galileo data, information and services,” says Fiammetta Diani, EUSPA Head of Market, Downstream and Innovation. 

Nearly 40 EU start-ups will be on hand at Entrepreneurship Day to share how their space-based innovations support the EU’s strategic agenda. The start-ups will also provide live demonstrations as part of their final pitch to judges, who will announce the winners of the #myEUspace competition at the end of the day.    

Information for fund managers and investors too

Entrepreneurship Day will also host the latest edition of our Capacity Building for Fund Managers series

Organised by EUSPA, in collaboration with the European Commission, European Space Agency (ESA) and European Investment Fund (EIF), this series of five workshops is designed to provide venture capitalists, fund managers and other investors with the in-depth information they need to make smart, informed investment decisions. 

“If you want to become an active investor in this exciting field or simply want to gather more information before deciding to raise a new fund, then this capacity building programme is for you,” adds Diani.

The workshop will be held live during Entrepreneurship Day, as well as online. 

A focus on start-ups 

On top of the start-up showcase, the #myEUspace competition and the Capacity Building workshop, the Entrepreneurship Day agenda  will feature panel discussions on how to grow a start-up and best practices in start-up investment. 

“Because of their agility and unique ability to adjust to new business models and adapt to new technologies, start-ups are particularly well-positioned to leverage the potential offered by the EU Space Programme,” notes Diani. 

The day also includes dedicated time for business matchmaking and of course plenty of opportunities for networking.

Join us virtually for the afternoon sessions by tuning in here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Entrepreneurship Day happening June 1st at EUSPA headquarters in Prague

Copernicus to expand its user-base with new demonstrators (Webinar)

24.5.2022 10:26  
The European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is playing a key role in the downstream user uptake activities of Copernicus, the EU Earth Observation Programme
Published: 
24 May 2022

Copernicus has been monitoring the Earth’s environment from several years now, providing a unique combination of full, free and open data and services in six thematic areas: Land, Marine, Atmosphere, Climate Change, Emergency and Security. The Copernicus system consists of three main components: a space component, which delivers data from a fleet of dedicated observation satellites (the ‘Sentinels’) and from contributing missions; an in-situ component which collects data acquired by a multitude of sensors at air-, sea- and ground-level; and a service component which transforms the wealth of satellite and in-situ data into timely and actionable information products.

The European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is playing a key role in the downstream user uptake activities of Copernicus, the EU Earth Observation Programme. In its current role related to the Copernicus Programme, EUSPA is looking to demonstrate 6 innovative Proof of Concepts, starting from 10 areas, divided in two Lots:

  • Lot 1: Mobility, Emergency and Infrastructures
  • Lot 2: Consumer and Environment

For each Lot, 3 Proof of Concepts will be demonstrated, starting from 5 areas, prioritizing the most impactful and promising markets for current and potential Copernicus data use.

Read this: How the EU Space Programme helps address the new challenges of a changing Arctic

The objective is to demonstrate the utilization of Copernicus data and services in the user’s operational environment. Therefore, the technical demonstration should be concretely integrated in a controlled operational environment of the user.

EUSPA intends to promote the widest participation possible by economic operators, in particular start-ups, new entrants, and SMEs.

To do so, the agency is organizing an industry day -online- on 06 June 2022 at 10:00 to present the details of the procurement for “Copernicus Demonstrators”. You can find the agenda here.

Potential participants will have the opportunity to learn more about the mission of the European Union Agency for the Space Programme and the procurement documentation and submission process.

For more information about the utility of Earth Observation data across various market segments you can consult the EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report.

Join us for the webinar, register here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is playing a key role in the downstream user uptake activities of Copernicus, the EU Earth Observation Programme

Copernicus to expand its user-base with new demonstrators

24.5.2022 10:26  
The European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is playing a key role in the downstream user uptake activities of Copernicus, the EU Earth Observation Programme
Published: 
24 May 2022

Copernicus has been monitoring the Earth’s environment from several years now, providing a unique combination of full, free and open data and services in six thematic areas: Land, Marine, Atmosphere, Climate Change, Emergency and Security. The Copernicus system consists of three main components: a space component, which delivers data from a fleet of dedicated observation satellites (the ‘Sentinels’) and from contributing missions; an in-situ component which collects data acquired by a multitude of sensors at air-, sea- and ground-level; and a service component which transforms the wealth of satellite and in-situ data into timely and actionable information products.

The European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is playing a key role in the downstream user uptake activities of Copernicus, the EU Earth Observation Programme. In its current role related to the Copernicus Programme, EUSPA is looking to demonstrate 6 innovative Proof of Concepts, starting from 10 areas, divided in two Lots:

  • Lot 1: Mobility, Emergency and Infrastructures
  • Lot 2: Consumer and Environment

For each Lot, 3 Proof of Concepts will be demonstrated, starting from 5 areas, prioritizing the most impactful and promising markets for current and potential Copernicus data use.

Read this: How the EU Space Programme helps address the new challenges of a changing Arctic

The objective is to demonstrate the utilization of Copernicus data and services in the user’s operational environment. Therefore, the technical demonstration should be concretely integrated in a controlled operational environment of the user.

EUSPA intends to promote the widest participation possible by economic operators, in particular start-ups, new entrants, and SMEs.

To do so, the agency is organizing an industry day on 06 June 2022 at 10:00 to present the details of the procurement for “Copernicus Demonstrators”. You can find the agenda here.

Potential participants will have the opportunity to learn more about the mission of the European Union Agency for the Space Programme and the procurement documentation and submission process.

For more information about the utility of Earth Observation data across various market segments you can consult the EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report.

To attend this industry day, please register here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is playing a key role in the downstream user uptake activities of Copernicus, the EU Earth Observation Programme

Copernicus to expand its user-base with new demonstrators

24.5.2022 10:26  
The European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is playing a key role in the downstream user uptake activities of Copernicus, the EU Earth Observation Programme
Published: 
24 May 2022

Copernicus has been monitoring the Earth’s environment from several years now, providing a unique combination of full, free and open data and services in six thematic areas: Land, Marine, Atmosphere, Climate Change, Emergency and Security. The Copernicus system consists of three main components: a space component, which delivers data from a fleet of dedicated observation satellites (the ‘Sentinels’) and from contributing missions; an in-situ component which collects data acquired by a multitude of sensors at air-, sea- and ground-level; and a service component which transforms the wealth of satellite and in-situ data into timely and actionable information products.

The European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is playing a key role in the downstream user uptake activities of Copernicus, the EU Earth Observation Programme. In its current role related to the Copernicus Programme, EUSPA is looking to demonstrate 6 innovative Proof of Concepts, starting from 10 areas, divided in two Lots:

  • Lot 1: Mobility, Emergency and Infrastructures
  • Lot 2: Consumer and Environment

For each Lot, 3 Proof of Concepts will be demonstrated, starting from 5 areas, prioritizing the most impactful and promising markets for current and potential Copernicus data use.

Read this: How the EU Space Programme helps address the new challenges of a changing Arctic

The objective is to demonstrate the utilization of Copernicus data and services in the user’s operational environment. Therefore, the technical demonstration should be concretely integrated in a controlled operational environment of the user.

EUSPA intends to promote the widest participation possible by economic operators, in particular start-ups, new entrants, and SMEs.

To do so, the agency is organizing an industry day on 06 June 2022 at 10:00 to present the details of the procurement for “Copernicus Demonstrators”. You can find the agenda here.

Potential participants will have the opportunity to learn more about the mission of the European Union Agency for the Space Programme and the procurement documentation and submission process.

For more information about the utility of Earth Observation data across various market segments you can consult the EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report.

To attend this industry day, please register here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is playing a key role in the downstream user uptake activities of Copernicus, the EU Earth Observation Programme

New chair-elect for the Security Accreditation Board (SAB) of EUSPA

19.5.2022 9:55  
Philippe Bertrand, EUSPA SAB Chair, Rodrigo da Costa, EUSPA Executive Director, Bruno Vermeire, outgoing EUSPA SAB chair
Published: 
19 May 2022

During the 52nd meeting of EUSPA’s Security Accreditation Board, Mr Philippe Bertrand, European affairs DGA coordinator, was elected as its new chair by the Member States representatives.

Philippe Bertrand has a vast experience in space-related activities and more specifically in satellite navigation. He has held several managerial positions in the public sector, namely in the French Armed Forces, the office of the French Prime Minister and the European Commission.

"I am honoured to have been elected Chair of the EUSPA Security Accreditation Board and I would like to thank all the EU Member States representatives for putting their trust in me. In times of increased security cyber threats and attacks, maintaining the systems intact and guaranteeing the reliability of data to end-users is of utmost importance" stated Bertrand. "All together, we will keep the safety and security of our space assets in the forefront" he concluded.Bertrand thanked outgoing Chair, Bruno Vermeire for his leadership over the past four years.

"EUSPA is a cluster of experienced professionals and they are doing a fantastic job. I want to thank them for their patience and their incredible competence in security matters. I would also like to thank the other Member states for their permanent commitment to supporting me in achieving my mission and the European Commission for their collaboration" were Vermeire’s final remarks.

"The only way to ensure the security of each and every link, and thus of the entire EU Space Programme, is through the collaboration of all relevant actors from EUSPA’s security apparatus. The SAB is central to ensuring the security of our systems" says EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa. "I look forward to working closely with our new SAB Chair now that EUSPA accredits all the EU Space Programme components" concludes da Costa.

"I would like to congratulate Phillipe Bertrand on his election by the EU Member States.  I am sure the EUSPA SAB will benefit from his guidance and expertise in space security" said EUSPA AB Chair, Václav Kobera.

About the Security Accreditation Board 

EUSPA is the security gatekeeper of the EU Space Programme. The SAB is the security accreditation authority for all of the EU Space Programme’s components. It ensures that all systems comply with the relevant security requirements, including Cyber and Supply Chain, and provides statements of approval to operate the systems and services with the objective that the EU space based services and data can be used by the EU citizens in a trusted way.

An independent body within EUSPA, the SAB is composed of a representative from each Member State, the Commission, and the High Representative for the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy. The board independently makes its decisions, including in regard to the Commission and other bodies responsible for implementing the components and provision of service.

More information on the SAB way of working can be found in the SAB Rules of Procedure (RoP).

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Philippe Bertrand, EUSPA SAB Chair, Rodrigo da Costa, EUSPA Executive Director, Bruno Vermeire, outgoing EUSPA SAB chair

New chair-elect for the Security Accreditation Board (SAB) of EUSPA

19.5.2022 9:55  
Philippe Bertrand, EUSPA SAB Chair, Rodrigo da Costa, EUSPA Executive Director, Bruno Vermeire, outgoing EUSPA SAB chair
Published: 
18 May 2022

During the 52nd meeting of EUSPA’s Security Accreditation Board, Mr Philippe Bertrand, European affairs DGA coordinator, was elected as its new chair by the Member States representatives.

Philippe Bertrand has a vast experience in space-related activities and more specifically in satellite navigation. He has held several managerial positions in the public sector, namely in the French Armed Forces, the office of the French Prime Minister and the European Commission.

"I am honoured to have been elected Chair of the EUSPA Security Accreditation Board and I would like to thank all the EU Member States representatives for putting their trust in me. In times of increased security cyber threats and attacks, maintaining the systems intact and guaranteeing the reliability of data to end-users is of utmost importance" stated Bertrand. "All together, we will keep the safety and security of our space assets in the forefront" he concluded.Bertrand thanked outgoing Chair, Bruno Vermeire for his leadership over the past four years.

"EUSPA is a cluster of experienced professionals and they are doing a fantastic job. I want to thank them for their patience and their incredible competence in security matters. I would also like to thank the other Member states for their permanent commitment to supporting me in achieving my mission and the European Commission for their collaboration" were Vermeire’s final remarks.

"The only way to ensure the security of each and every link, and thus of the entire EU Space Programme, is through the collaboration of all relevant actors from EUSPA’s security apparatus. The SAB is central to ensuring the security of our systems" says EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa. "I look forward to working closely with our new SAB Chair now that EUSPA accredits all the EU Space Programme components" concludes da Costa.

"I would like to congratulate Phillippe Bertrand on his election by the EU Member States.  I am sure the EUSPA SAB will benefit from his guidance and expertise in space security" said EUSPA AB Chair, Václav Kobera.

About the Security Accreditation Board 

EUSPA is the security gatekeeper of the EU Space Programme. The SAB is the security accreditation authority for all of the EU Space Programme’s components. It ensures that all systems comply with the relevant security requirements, including Cyber and Supply Chain, and provides statements of approval to operate the systems and services with the objective that the EU space based services and data can be used by the EU citizens in a trusted way.

An independent body within EUSPA, the SAB is composed of a representative from each Member State, the Commission, and the High Representative for the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy. The board independently makes its decisions, including in regard to the Commission and other bodies responsible for implementing the components and provision of service.

More information on the SAB way of working can be found in the SAB Rules of Procedure (RoP).

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Philippe Bertrand, EUSPA SAB Chair, Rodrigo da Costa, EUSPA Executive Director, Bruno Vermeire, outgoing EUSPA SAB chair

Happy Birthday EUSPA!

12.5.2022 8:58  
Published: 
12 May 2022

The EU Agency for the Space Programme celebrates its first anniversary with new services, a new satellite and even more end users.

Time flies when you’re busy getting things done. And in the first year of its existence, the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) has gotten a lot of things done.

EUSPA’s launch one year ago today represented the start of a new era for the EU Space Programme,” says EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. “With an expanded mandate and new responsibilities, we are committed to helping the EU, its citizens and its businesses maximise the many social and economic benefits of space.”

“Today we celebrate EUSPA. It's also the opportunity to reflect and be proud of the milestones we achieved by working together. More users, more services, and satellites in space! Go Europe, go EUSPA!'' concludes EUSPA Administrative Board Chair, Václav Kobera.

Building on the legacy of the European GNSS Agency (GSA), EUSPA’s mandate includes not only overseeing the security, services and market uptake of Galileo and EGNOS, but also Copernicus, Europe’s Earth Observation (EO) service – an area with significant commercial potential.

According to the first ever EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report, published earlier this year, SMEs and start-ups account for more than 93% of European Earth Observation companies. With revenues set to double from approximately EUR 2.8 billion to over EUR 5.5 billion within the next decade, the EO market is full of opportunities for EU businesses and entrepreneurs.

To ensure companies take advantage of these opportunities, EUSPA has positioned itself as the go-to-source for all things related to Earth Observation. In addition to providing market intelligence, the Agency works directly with businesses to help them best leverage Copernicus data, information and services. EUSPA also launched several EO focused funding opportunities, including Horizon Calls and innovation competitions.

But Copernicus doesn’t exist in a vacuum. It also complements the other components of the EU Space Programme, which is why EUSPA is constantly promoting the benefits of using Copernicus, Galileo and EGNOS together.

“Galileo and EGNOS enable the determination of a precise position, anywhere and Copernicus provides information on the Earth’s surface, atmosphere and oceans,” adds da Costa. “When you put these programmes together, you unleash an array of synergies that can have a powerful impact on society and the planet.”

A new pillar for the EU Space Programme

This list of space programmes will soon add a new name. GOVSATCOM, the fourth pillar of the EU Space Programme, is a user-centric programme designed to meet the unique requirements of governmental applications, including those used for crisis management, surveillance and the management of key infrastructures.

“While Copernicus and EGNSS provide the necessary data and positioning, European governments and institutions need a means of communication that is robustly protected against interference, interception, intrusion and other risks” explains da Costa. “Once operational, GOVSATCOM will bridge this gap between the need for assured and secure communication and the capabilities offered by Copernicus, Galileo and EGNOS.”

As part of its expanded mandate, EUSPA has been entrusted with the procurement of the secure ground segment, its operations and the coordination of the user-related aspects of GOVSATCOM.

The mission remains the same

EUSPA’s first year also saw the development of new services and the launch of new satellites. As to the former, the Agency has been busy developing two new Galileo services: a High Accuracy Service (HAS) for high accuracy Precise Point Positioning (PPP) corrections and the Open Service Navigation Message Authentication (OSNMA), which will provide receivers with a first level of protection against falsifying and spoofing.

The entry into service of a new additional satellite, GSAT 2203, has brought enhanced accuracy and more precise positioning to the Galileo service provision.

But even with its expanded mandate and new responsibilities, EUSPA’s mission remains the same: linking space to user needs. “I am extremely proud of everything EUSPA has achieved in a year, which is the direct result of our dedicated professionals, all of whom embrace a service-oriented mindset and are passionate about making space technology accessible to EU citizens and businesses,” concludes da Costa.

“It is an honour to serve as Chair of the Security Accreditation Board, the independent authority that provides accreditation to all of the EU Space Programme’s components. Thanks to SAB, EUSPA is at the front lines of cybersecurity, providing end-users with the confidence of knowing that the space-derived data they depend on is safe and secure,” adds Bruno Vermeire.

Test your knowledge on all things EU Space here!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Happy Birthday EUSPA!

12.5.2022 8:58  
Published: 
12 May 2022

The EU Agency for the Space Programme celebrates its first anniversary with new services, a new satellite and even more end users.

Time flies when you’re busy getting things done. And in the first year of its existence, the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) has gotten a lot of things done.

EUSPA’s launch one year ago today represented the start of a new era for the EU Space Programme,” says EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. “With an expanded mandate and new responsibilities, we are committed to helping the EU, its citizens and its businesses maximise the many social and economic benefits of space.”

Building on the legacy of the European GNSS Agency (GSA), EUSPA’s mandate includes not only overseeing the security, services and market uptake of Galileo and EGNOS, but also Copernicus, Europe’s Earth Observation (EO) service – an area with significant commercial potential.

According to the first ever EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report, published earlier this year, SMEs and start-ups account for more than 93% of European Earth Observation companies. With revenues set to double from approximately EUR 2.8 billion to over EUR 5.5 billion within the next decade, the EO market is full of opportunities for EU businesses and entrepreneurs.

To ensure companies take advantage of these opportunities, EUSPA has positioned itself as the go-to-source for all things related to Earth Observation. In addition to providing market intelligence, the Agency works directly with businesses to help them best leverage Copernicus data, information and services. EUSPA also launched several EO focused funding opportunities, including Horizon Calls and innovation competitions.

But Copernicus doesn’t exist in a vacuum. It also complements the other components of the EU Space Programme, which is why EUSPA is constantly promoting the benefits of using Copernicus, Galileo and EGNOS together.

“Galileo and EGNOS enable the determination of a precise position, anywhere and Copernicus provides information on the Earth’s surface, atmosphere and oceans,” adds da Costa. “When you put these programmes together, you unleash an array of synergies that can have a powerful impact on society and the planet.”

A new pillar for the EU Space Programme

This list of space programmes will soon add a new name. GOVSATCOM, the fourth pillar of the EU Space Programme, is a user-centric programme designed to meet the unique requirements of governmental applications, including those used for crisis management, surveillance and the management of key infrastructures.

“While Copernicus and EGNSS provide the necessary data and positioning, European governments and institutions need a means of communication that is robustly protected against interference, interception, intrusion and other risks” explains da Costa. “Once operational, GOVSATCOM will bridge this gap between the need for assured and secure communication and the capabilities offered by Copernicus, Galileo and EGNOS.”

As part of its expanded mandate, EUSPA has been entrusted with the procurement of the secure ground segment, its operations and the coordination of the user-related aspects of GOVSATCOM.

The mission remains the same

EUSPA’s first year also saw the development of new services and the launch of new satellites. As to the former, the Agency has been busy developing two new Galileo services: a High Accuracy Service (HAS) for high accuracy Precise Point Positioning (PPP) corrections and the Open Service Navigation Message Authentication (OSNMA), which will provide receivers with a first level of protection against falsifying and spoofing.

The entry into service of a new additional satellite, GSAT 2203, has brought enhanced accuracy and more precise positioning to the Galileo service provision.

But even with its expanded mandate and new responsibilities, EUSPA’s mission remains the same: linking space to user needs. “I am extremely proud of everything EUSPA has achieved in a year, which is the direct result of our dedicated professionals, all of whom embrace a service-oriented mindset and are passionate about making space technology accessible to EU citizens and businesses,” concludes da Costa.

“It is an honour to serve as Chair of the Security Accreditation Board, the independent authority that provides accreditation to all of the EU Space Programme’s components. Thanks to SAB, EUSPA is at the front lines of cybersecurity, providing end-users with the confidence of knowing that the space-derived data they depend on is safe and secure,” adds Bruno Vermeire.

“Today we celebrate EUSPA. It's also the opportunity to reflect and be proud of the milestones we achieved by working together. More users, more services, and satellites in space! Go Europe, go EUSPA!'' concludes EUSPA Administrative Board Chair, Václav Kobera.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Happy Birthday EUSPA!

12.5.2022 8:58  
Published: 
12 May 2022

The EU Agency for the Space Programme celebrates its first anniversary with new services, a new satellite and even more end users.

Time flies when you’re busy getting things done. And in the first year of its existence, the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) has gotten a lot of things done.

EUSPA’s launch one year ago today represented the start of a new era for the EU Space Programme,” says EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. “With an expanded mandate and new responsibilities, we are committed to helping the EU, its citizens and its businesses maximise the many social and economic benefits of space.”

“Today we celebrate EUSPA. It's also the opportunity to reflect and be proud of the milestones we achieved by working together. More users, more services, and satellites in space! Go Europe, go EUSPA!'' concludes EUSPA Administrative Board Chair, Václav Kobera.

Building on the legacy of the European GNSS Agency (GSA), EUSPA’s mandate includes not only overseeing the security, services and market uptake of Galileo and EGNOS, but also Copernicus, Europe’s Earth Observation (EO) service – an area with significant commercial potential.

According to the first ever EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report, published earlier this year, SMEs and start-ups account for more than 93% of European Earth Observation companies. With revenues set to double from approximately EUR 2.8 billion to over EUR 5.5 billion within the next decade, the EO market is full of opportunities for EU businesses and entrepreneurs.

To ensure companies take advantage of these opportunities, EUSPA has positioned itself as the go-to-source for all things related to Earth Observation. In addition to providing market intelligence, the Agency works directly with businesses to help them best leverage Copernicus data, information and services. EUSPA also launched several EO focused funding opportunities, including Horizon Calls and innovation competitions.

But Copernicus doesn’t exist in a vacuum. It also complements the other components of the EU Space Programme, which is why EUSPA is constantly promoting the benefits of using Copernicus, Galileo and EGNOS together.

“Galileo and EGNOS enable the determination of a precise position, anywhere and Copernicus provides information on the Earth’s surface, atmosphere and oceans,” adds da Costa. “When you put these programmes together, you unleash an array of synergies that can have a powerful impact on society and the planet.”

A new pillar for the EU Space Programme

This list of space programmes will soon add a new name. GOVSATCOM, the fourth pillar of the EU Space Programme, is a user-centric programme designed to meet the unique requirements of governmental applications, including those used for crisis management, surveillance and the management of key infrastructures.

“While Copernicus and EGNSS provide the necessary data and positioning, European governments and institutions need a means of communication that is robustly protected against interference, interception, intrusion and other risks” explains da Costa. “Once operational, GOVSATCOM will bridge this gap between the need for assured and secure communication and the capabilities offered by Copernicus, Galileo and EGNOS.”

As part of its expanded mandate, EUSPA has been entrusted with the procurement of the secure ground segment, its operations and the coordination of the user-related aspects of GOVSATCOM.

The mission remains the same

EUSPA’s first year also saw the development of new services and the launch of new satellites. As to the former, the Agency has been busy developing two new Galileo services: a High Accuracy Service (HAS) for high accuracy Precise Point Positioning (PPP) corrections and the Open Service Navigation Message Authentication (OSNMA), which will provide receivers with a first level of protection against falsifying and spoofing.

The entry into service of a new additional satellite, GSAT 2203, has brought enhanced accuracy and more precise positioning to the Galileo service provision.

But even with its expanded mandate and new responsibilities, EUSPA’s mission remains the same: linking space to user needs. “I am extremely proud of everything EUSPA has achieved in a year, which is the direct result of our dedicated professionals, all of whom embrace a service-oriented mindset and are passionate about making space technology accessible to EU citizens and businesses,” concludes da Costa.

“It is an honour to serve as Chair of the Security Accreditation Board, the independent authority that provides accreditation to all of the EU Space Programme’s components. Thanks to SAB, EUSPA is at the front lines of cybersecurity, providing end-users with the confidence of knowing that the space-derived data they depend on is safe and secure,” adds Bruno Vermeire.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Galileo High Accuracy Service Signal in Space Interface Control Document officially published

11.5.2022 14:45  
The new Galileo High Accuracy Service Signal-In-Space Interference Control Document (HAS SIS ICD) is now published
Published: 
11 May 2022

Galileo High Accuracy Service gets one step closer to the launch of initial services. 

Galileo, Europe’s Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), is now one step closer to declaring the start of initial services for its High Accuracy Service (HAS). The news follows the publication by the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), together with the European Commission and the European Space Agency, of the first Galileo HAS Signal in Space (SiS) Interface Control Document (link).

By providing free-of-charge, high accuracy Precise Point Positioning (PPP) corrections through both the Galileo signal (E6-B) and via the internet, the HAS will offer users improved positioning performance with an accuracy of less than two decimetres. 

“Galileo will be the first GNSS constellation capable of providing a high accuracy service directly through the Signal in Space,” explains EUSPA Guerric Pont, Galileo Services, Programme Manager. “This is unique in that, typically, high accuracy services are based on accurate satellite and atmospheric data provided from a third party, but not directly from the GNSS”.

According to Pont, high accuracy services are experiencing a massive boost in interest, thanks in large part to new capabilities of GNSS receivers and the rapid emergence of new applications that require accurate location data. “Currently, high accuracy is primarily used in such professional applications as surveying, precision agriculture and civil engineering, amongst others,” he says. “However, new and emerging applications, including autonomous driving, unmanned vehicles, robotics and a range of location-based services will all welcome high accuracy.” 

Pont also notes that, when used in synergy with Copernicus, the Galileo HAS will open up new market possibilities and help design new services. 

The accumulation of an ongoing process

In 2021, EUSPA, in coordination with the European Commission and the European Space Agency (ESA), published an Information Note on the Galileo HAS. The note provided an overview of the service’s main characteristics, along with information on such key features as service levels, targeted performance and markets and a roadmap for implementation. 

This was followed by a call for Expression of Interest for High Accuracy Service Testing, which invited external stakeholders to participate in a testing campaign of the Galileo HAS Signal in Space broadcasting. The goal of the campaign was to collect relevant feedback, not only on the HAS SiS Interface Control Document structure and implementation at the receiver level, but also on service-related aspects and specifications. 

“The Galileo programme has been performing a long set of HAS testing activities since 2019, which cumulated in the first-ever HAS signal broadcast in May 2021,” adds Javier de Blas, EUSPA Commercial and HAS manager. “Based on the feedback gained during the joint efforts conducted by EUSPA, the European Commission and ESA, with the key support of European aerospace industry during the testing phase, we are now able to publish the first Galileo High Accuracy Service Signal in Space Interface Control Document.”  

Following the publication of this HAS SIS ICD, the Galileo Programme will continue the deployment and service validation of HAS over the next months, in view of an operational declaration of HAS initial service, or HAS Phase 1, by the end of 2022. This will enable the development of products in parallel to the gradual entry into full operational service in the next few years.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The new Galileo High Accuracy Service Signal-In-Space Interference Control Document (HAS SIS ICD) is now published

Galileo High Accuracy Service Signal in Space Interface Control Document officially published

11.5.2022 14:45  
The new Galileo High Accuracy Service Signal-In-Space Interference Control Document (HAS SIS ICD) is now published
Published: 
11 May 2022

Galileo High Accuracy Service gets one step closer to the launch of initial services. 

Galileo, Europe’s Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), is now one step closer to declaring the start of initial services for its High Accuracy Service (HAS). The news follows the publication by the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), together with the European Commission and the European Space Agency, of the first Galileo HAS Signal in Space (SiS) Interface Control Document (link).

By providing free-of-charge, high accuracy Precise Point Positioning (PPP) corrections through both the Galileo signal (E6-B) and via the internet, the HAS will offer users improved positioning performance with an accuracy of less than two decimetres. 

“Galileo will be the first GNSS constellation capable of providing a high accuracy service directly through the Signal in Space,” explains EUSPA Guerric Pont, Galileo Services, Programme Manager. “This is unique in that, typically, high accuracy services are based on accurate satellite and atmospheric data provided from a third party, but not directly from the GNSS”.

According to Pont, high accuracy services are experiencing a massive boost in interest, thanks in large part to new capabilities of GNSS receivers and the rapid emergence of new applications that require accurate location data. “Currently, high accuracy is primarily used in such professional applications as surveying, precision agriculture and civil engineering, amongst others,” he says. “However, new and emerging applications, including autonomous driving, unmanned vehicles, robotics and a range of location-based services will all welcome high accuracy.” 

Pont also notes that, when used in synergy with Copernicus, the Galileo HAS will open up new market possibilities and help design new services. 

The accumulation of an ongoing process

In 2021, EUSPA, in coordination with the European Commission and the European Space Agency (ESA), published an Information Note on the Galileo HAS. The note provided an overview of the service’s main characteristics, along with information on such key features as service levels, targeted performance and markets and a roadmap for implementation. 

This was followed by a call for Expression of Interest for High Accuracy Service Testing, which invited external stakeholders to participate in a testing campaign of the Galileo HAS Signal in Space broadcasting. The goal of the campaign was to collect relevant feedback, not only on the HAS SiS Interface Control Document structure and implementation at the receiver level, but also on service-related aspects and specifications. 

“The Galileo programme has been performing a long set of HAS testing activities since 2019, which cumulated in the first-ever HAS signal broadcast in May 2021,” adds Javier de Blas, EUSPA Commercial and HAS manager. “Based on the feedback gained during the joint efforts conducted by EUSPA, the European Commission and ESA, with the key support of European aerospace industry during the testing phase, we are now able to publish the first Galileo High Accuracy Service Signal in Space Interface Control Document.”  

Following the publication of this HAS SIS ICD, the Galileo Programme will continue the deployment and service validation of HAS over the next months, in view of an operational declaration of HAS initial service, or HAS Phase 1, by the end of 2022. This will enable the development of products in parallel to the gradual entry into full operational service in the next few years.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The new Galileo High Accuracy Service Signal-In-Space Interference Control Document (HAS SIS ICD) is now published

Celebrating Europe’s biggest achievements – including the EU Space Programme

9.5.2022 12:02  
Europe Day held on 9 May every year celebrates peace and unity in Europe.
Published: 
09 May 2022

EUSPA celebrates Europe Day – a chance to highlight European integration and values and how the EU Space Programme is helping build an even better EU for tomorrow. 

Today, the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) joins citizens across the EU in celebrating Europe. 

Known as Europe Day, the 9th of May marks the signing of the Schuman Declaration, an historic agreement that laid the foundation for a united Europe and planted the seeds to what would eventually grow into the European Union.

As the Declaration states, “Europe will not be made all at once… it will be built through concrete achievements.” Europe Day is an opportunity to reflect on those many achievements – including the achievement that is the EU Space Programme.

Over the past 20 years, the EU has been committed to creating a space programme and infrastructure that is competitive, innovative and capable of delivering real benefits to citizens and businesses alike. The programme has made great leaps forward in recent years, delivering unique services in satellite navigation, Earth Observation and telecommunications, along with strengthening both the upstream and downstream sectors.

The essential link

Positioned as the link between space and user needs, EUSPA plays a central role in the EU Space Programme’s success. “By engaging with the entire EU space community, EUSPA drives innovation-based growth in the European economy and contributes to the safety of EU citizens and the security of the Union and its Member States, while at the same time reinforcing the EU’s strategic autonomy,” says EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa.

As a result of this work, space technology, data and services not only support the interest of the EU, they’re also indispensable to the daily lives of Europeans. Over 3 billion people are currently using Galileo, the world’s most precise positioning system, while many governments, national agencies, institutions, researchers and businesses are all leveraging the data and information coming from Copernicus, the world’s best Earth Observation system. 

Even with the many benefits that the EU Space Programme is already delivering, we’re just scratching the surface of what’s possible. “Businesses and society will increasingly look to space for solutions to some of the world’s most pressing challenges,” adds da Costa. “EUSPA is preparing for this space-based future today.” 

Join us in Prague 

What our space-based future may look like will be on full display on 9 May during Prague’s annual Europe Day celebration. Held on the city’s Střelecký Island starting at 13:00 CET, the event is a showcase of EU integration and values. 

EUSPA will be there to show how you already benefit from space, along with highlighting how Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus are building a better future for all Europeans. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Europe Day held on 9 May every year celebrates peace and unity in Europe.

Celebrating Europe’s biggest achievements – including the EU Space Programme

9.5.2022 12:02  
Europe Day held on 9 May every year celebrates peace and unity in Europe.
Published: 
09 May 2022

EUSPA celebrates Europe Day – a chance to highlight European integration and values and how the EU Space Programme is helping build an even better EU for tomorrow. 

Today, the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) joins citizens across the EU in celebrating Europe. 

Known as Europe Day, the 9th of May marks the signing of the Schuman Declaration, an historic agreement that laid the foundation for a united Europe and planted the seeds to what would eventually grow into the European Union.

As the Declaration states, “Europe will not be made all at once… it will be built through concrete achievements.” Europe Day is an opportunity to reflect on those many achievements – including the achievement that is the EU Space Programme.

Over the past 20 years, the EU has been committed to creating a space programme and infrastructure that is competitive, innovative and capable of delivering real benefits to citizens and businesses alike. The programme has made great leaps forward in recent years, delivering unique services in satellite navigation, Earth Observation and telecommunications, along with strengthening both the upstream and downstream sectors.

The essential link

Positioned as the link between space and user needs, EUSPA plays a central role in the EU Space Programme’s success. “By engaging with the entire EU space community, EUSPA drives innovation-based growth in the European economy and contributes to the safety of EU citizens and the security of the Union and its Member States, while at the same time reinforcing the EU’s strategic autonomy,” says EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa.

As a result of this work, space technology, data and services not only support the interest of the EU, they’re also indispensable to the daily lives of Europeans. Over 3 billion people are currently using Galileo, the world’s most precise positioning system, while many governments, national agencies, institutions, researchers and businesses are all leveraging the data and information coming from Copernicus, the world’s best Earth Observation system. 

Even with the many benefits that the EU Space Programme is already delivering, we’re just scratching the surface of what’s possible. “Businesses and society will increasingly look to space for solutions to some of the world’s most pressing challenges,” adds da Costa. “EUSPA is preparing for this space-based future today.” 

Join us in Prague 

What our space-based future may look like will be on full display on 9 May during Prague’s annual Europe Day celebration. Held on the city’s Střelecký Island starting at 13:00 CET, the event is a showcase of EU integration and values. 

EUSPA will be there to show how you already benefit from space, along with highlighting how Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus are building a better future for all Europeans. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Europe Day held on 9 May every year celebrates peace and unity in Europe.

EUSPA is looking for Galileo Engineering Support

6.5.2022 9:49  
EUSPA is organizing an industry day on 13 May 2022 at 16.00 to present the details of the procurement for “Engineering Services”.
Published: 
06 May 2022

EUSPA published a procurement on “Engineering Services” for the Galileo Programme. To encourage the widest participation possible, the agency is organizing an industry day to present all the procurement details on 13 May 2022 at 16:00.

The European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is playing a key role in the Galileo Programme, the EU Global Navigation Satellite System. In its current and future roles related to the Galileo Programme EUSPA is validating the Services, accepting new system upgrades, managing the operations, maintaining and evolving the infrastructure and promoting the use and benefits of Galileo. To perform these tasks effectively and efficiently, EUSPA will continue to rely on industrial support. 

The procurement of this support covers several engineering domains, allowing EUSPA to ensure continuity and maintenance of the Galileo  operational capabilities, implement the planned evolutions and fulfill its new role as Galileo System Prime for the system in operation. The support is requested in separate lots each focused on different activities and expertise. EUSPA is committed to promoting the widest participation possible by economic operators, in particular start-ups, new entrants, and SMEs. 

The agency is thus organizing an industry day on 13 May 2022 at 16.00 to present the details of the procurement for “Engineering Services”. You can find the agenda here.

Potential participants will have the opportunity to learn more about the mission of the European Union Agency for the Space Programme and the procurement documentation and submission process.

To attend this industry day, please register here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EUSPA is organizing an industry day on 13 May 2022 at 16.00 to present the details of the procurement for “Engineering Services”.

EUSPA is looking for Galileo Engineering Support

6.5.2022 9:49  
EUSPA is organizing an industry day on 13 May 2022 at 16.00 to present the details of the procurement for “Engineering Services”.
Published: 
06 May 2022

EUSPA published a procurement on “Engineering Services” for the Galileo Programme. To encourage the widest participation possible, the agency is organizing an industry day to present all the procurement details on 13 May 2022 at 16:00.

The European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is playing a key role in the Galileo Programme, the EU Global Navigation Satellite System. In its current and future roles related to the Galileo Programme EUSPA is validating the Services, accepting new system upgrades, managing the operations, maintaining and evolving the infrastructure and promoting the use and benefits of Galileo. To perform these tasks effectively and efficiently, EUSPA will continue to rely on industrial support. 

The procurement of this support covers several engineering domains, allowing EUSPA to ensure continuity and maintenance of the Galileo  operational capabilities, implement the planned evolutions and fulfill its new role as Galileo System Prime for the system in operation. The support is requested in separate lots each focused on different activities and expertise. EUSPA is committed to promoting the widest participation possible by economic operators, in particular start-ups, new entrants, and SMEs. 

The agency is thus organizing an industry day on 13 May 2022 at 16.00 to present the details of the procurement for “Engineering Services”. You can find the agenda here.

Potential participants will have the opportunity to learn more about the mission of the European Union Agency for the Space Programme and the procurement documentation and submission process.

To attend this industry day, please register here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EUSPA is organizing an industry day on 13 May 2022 at 16.00 to present the details of the procurement for “Engineering Services”.

Another step for EU’s positioning system: Nikolina joins the Galileo family!

5.5.2022 12:32  
Nikolina joins the Galileo family
Published: 
05 May 2022

After a challenging Launch and Early Orbit Phase (LEOP) and Testing campaign during the pandemic times, Galileo satellite “Nikolina” (GSAT0223) is entering service provision as of today. The satellite will reinforce the performance and robustness of the EU’s satellite-based positioning system.

GSAT0223 was brought into space on 05/12/2021 with Galileo launch L11 after the usual design, acceptance, validation, launch and early orbit preparation and operations phases.

This was the first Early Orbit Operations phase conducted directly from the operational centre in Germany, under the responsibility of EUSPA. Thanks to the efforts of all parties involved, “Nikolina” is now a happy member of the Galileo family!

GSAT0223 and its launch-companion GSAT0224 (Shriya) are the first pair of the third batch of Galileo First Generation satellites to reach space. GSAT0223 will fill the last empty slot in Galileo’s orbital plane B. Shriya is soon completing its in-orbit validation and will then join the operational constellation. Furthermore, ten additional satellites of the same batch are continuing assembly, acceptance and launch preparations.

New horizons for the EU Space Programme and its Galileo component are opening up.

Stay tuned for more updates on I/NAV and the next entries into service!

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Nikolina joins the Galileo family

Partnering to promote sustainable fisheries and aquafarms

4.5.2022 9:31  
Rodrigo da Costa, EUSPA Executive Director, Susan Steele, Executive Director of EFCA
Published: 
04 May 2022

A new Memorandum of Understanding aims to better leverage Galileo and Copernicus to further the goals of the Common Fisheries Policy and the EU’s Green Deal.

Today, the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) and the European Fisheries Control Agency (EFCA), the EU agency responsible for coordinating national operational activities in fisheries and assisting Member States in applying the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP), have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU). The cooperation agreement reflects the two agencies shared commitment to creating sustainable fisheries and aquaculture – both of which are key components to the European Union’s Green Deal.

“Through the MoU, EUSPA will help EFCA better leverage the EU Space Programme, particularly Galileo, the European Global Satellite Navigation System (EGNSS) and Copernicus, the European Earth Observation programme. This agreement allows EFCA to gain new tools for enforcing the Common Fisheries Policy and EUSPA will also be able to benefit from EFCA’s expertise, allowing us to better meet the needs of the fisheries control community,” says EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa.

Cracking down on illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing

Both Copernicus and Galileo are already being used to assess the location of fish stocks and to track the location of vessels in an effort to prevent illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing, an important aspect of the CFP. The key to doing so is to increase transparency and provide precise information to policy makers and regulators like the EFCA. To this end, Earth Observation services, including the Maritime Surveillance component of the Copernicus Security Service, along with GNSS-based solutions utilising Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) and Vessel Monitoring Systems (VMS), are important tools in the fight against IUU fishing – a practice that not only costs the global economy between EUR 9 and 21 billion annually, but also threatens our oceans’ fragile biodiversity.

Galileo and Copernicus will improve EFCA capacity to detect, identify and categorise suspected non-compliant fishing activities and will result in safer, more sustainable and efficient maritime operations.

According to Dr Steele, EFCA is already using the EU Space Programme. Back in 2017, EFCA requested the support of Copernicus Maritime Surveillance (CMS) to monitor a vessel seen towing a cage of bluefin tuna – a strictly regulated species. By providing an optical image of a precise location, the agency was able to confirm that the targeted vessel was compliant with all relevant EU regulations.

Another good example of how Galileo and Copernicus are being used to curtail IUU fishing can be found in Norway, where the Norwegian Coastal Authority, in collaboration with Mercator Ocean, are combining GNSS and Earth Observation data with artificial intelligence to identify vessels with suspicious route patterns. The tool is contributing to a more efficient identification and monitoring of vessels that are possibly conducting illicit activities or are engaged in IUU fishing.

Supporting Europe’s growing aquaculture sector

Copernicus and Galileo are also being used to support Europe’s growing aquaculture sector. By providing information and data on environmental conditions (salinity, currents, temperature, etc.) and long-term weather forecasts, EO-based applications play a key role selecting ideal locations to establish aquafarms.

Once the aquafarm is up and running, much of the work is done by fully automated vessels that rely on the accurate positioning and navigation provided by Galileo.

Several projects set to benefit

To kick-off the MoU, EUSPA and EFCA have identified several EU-funded projects that could benefit from the agencies’ cooperation. These include Bluebox Porbeagle, which is developing a transceiver to report the position of vessels computed using Galileo and authenticated with Galileo Open Service Navigation Message Authentication, and GAMBAS, a project building a search and rescue beacon that can be remotely activated by rescue coordination centres. The MoU can be amended to expand the cooperation to include other projects and initiatives.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Rodrigo da Costa, EUSPA Executive Director, Susan Steele, Executive Director of EFCA

EU Space Week 2022: Addressing user needs through #EUSpace

3.5.2022 10:55  
EU Space Week, the go-to event of for Europe’s space community, is happening 3 – 6 October 2022 in Prague, Czech Republic.
Published: 
03 May 2022

EU Space Week, the go-to event of for Europe’s space community, is happening 3 – 6 October 2022 in Prague, Czech Republic.

After two years of online-only editions, EU Space Week 2022 is set to bring together the entire European Union space community. From policymakers to industry, start-ups, public authorities, investors and users, EU Space Week is the place to be for anyone interested in current – and future – trends of the EU Space Programme.

The event is jointly organised by the European Commission and the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) and held under the auspices of the Czech Presidency and the City of Prague.

What to expect

Plunge into the world of EU Space with several days full of exciting sessions, events, demonstrations and business opportunities.

With the aim of giving a ‘New Space’ angle to EU Space, this year’s edition will be about entrepreneurship and innovation in space-related businesses across the EU. We will also be showcasing the critical role the EU Space programme plays in igniting positive societal changes.

It's time to see each other again!

Let’s meet and reconnect in Prague at EU Space Week 2022!

Registration will be open soon, but you can already mark your calendars for 3 – 6 October.

And be sure to follow DG DEFIS (@DEFIS_eu) and EUSPA (@EU4Space) on Twitter for updates.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EU Space Week, the go-to event of for Europe’s space community, is happening 3 – 6 October 2022 in Prague, Czech Republic.

EU Space Week 2022: Addressing user needs through #EUSpace

3.5.2022 10:55  
EU Space Week, the go-to event of for Europe’s space community, is happening 3 – 6 October 2022 in Prague, Czech Republic.
Published: 
03 May 2022

EU Space Week, the go-to event of for Europe’s space community, is happening 3 – 6 October 2022 in Prague, Czech Republic.

After two years of online-only editions, EU Space Week 2022 is set to bring together the entire European Union space community. From policymakers to industry, start-ups, public authorities, investors and users, EU Space Week is the place to be for anyone interested in current – and future – trends of the EU Space Programme.

The event is jointly organised by the European Commission and the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) and held under the auspices of the Czech Presidency and the City of Prague.

What to expect

Plunge into the world of EU Space with several days full of exciting sessions, events, demonstrations and business opportunities.

With the aim of giving a ‘New Space’ angle to EU Space, this year’s edition will be about entrepreneurship and innovation in space-related businesses across the EU. We will also be showcasing the critical role the EU Space programme plays in igniting positive societal changes.

It's time to see each other again!

Let’s meet and reconnect in Prague at EU Space Week 2022!

Registration will be open soon, but you can already mark your calendars for 3 – 6 October.

And be sure to follow DG DEFIS (@DEFIS_eu) and EUSPA (@EU4Space) on Twitter for updates.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EU Space Week, the go-to event of for Europe’s space community, is happening 3 – 6 October 2022 in Prague, Czech Republic.

Galileo helps map out safer cycling routes in the Netherlands

28.4.2022 15:49  
Surveying with integrated equipment
Published: 
28 April 2022

An initiative in the Netherlands leverages Galileo’s enhanced accuracy and positioning to conduct a comprehensive safety assessment of local bicycle paths.

The Dutch love their bikes. In fact, according to a European Commission report on quality transportation, 36% of Dutch people say biking is their preferred method for getting around.

Bolstered by a robust cycling infrastructure, including dedicated paths, protected lanes, and plenty of bicycle parking, 27% of all travel in the Netherlands is done by bike. In cities like Amsterdam and Zwolle, this percentage is even higher.

But, as impressive as these figures may be, one biking-related statistic cannot be ignored: the number of cycling accidents. According to SafetyNL, nearly 50,000 cyclists were seriously injured in 2019. With cycling continuing to grow in popularity, this number will only increase – which is why the Dutch province of Noord-Brabant decided to conduct a trial for comprehensive safety assessment of its bicycle infrastructure.

Carried out in cooperation with Royal HaskoningDHV, BAM Infra Nederland and the Prisma Groep, the initiative used Galileo alongside other technologies to create detailed and comprehensive maps of the area’s bike paths. After assessing their status and analysing traffic safety, each path was given a unique safety score.

A more accurate picture

The inventory was created by equipping bikes and riders with sensors, accelerometers, LiDAR and cameras – and of course, Galileo-enabled GNSS receivers.

 Prisma Groep first trial for rider assistance

 Backup sensors counts with GNSS, IMU, two velodyne scanners and five cameras

“Using Galileo means more visible satellites and thus increased signal continuity and availability,” says Erik van Duffelen, a project coordinator at the Prisma Groep. “This capability is particularly important in areas with limited line of sight, like bike paths that traverse through urban canyons or under dense tree canopies.”

As the cyclist rides around, the equipment scans the environment, capturing measurements and recording location. During post-processing, the captured data is analysed using artificial intelligence models and algorithms. The result forms the basis of a “digital twin” of the bicycle paths, which not only helps to update older maps, but also includes information about obstacles and other safety hazards. This can be used to improve cyclist safety and to inform future infrastructure development.

 Surveying with integrated equipments

“Galileo gave us a more accurate picture of the bicycle paths and a more precise inventory of the cycling infrastructure,” adds van Duffelen. “Thanks to this level of accuracy and precision, cyclists and authorities alike have the information they need to improve safety.”

 Sketch of the bicycles paths after processing data

Following a successful pilot programme, the initiative has launched a comprehensive commercial service. Called BikePathfinder (FietsPadvinder; article in Dutch), the service is available to road authorities and other entities working to improve cycling infrastructure and safety.

 FietsPadvinder logo

To learn more about Galileo, its services and differentiators, please register at the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) or contact the GSC Helpdesk at www.gsc-europa.eu/helpdesk.

The authors would like to thank the Prisma Groep for their help in preparing this article.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Surveying with integrated equipment

Galileo helps map out safer cycling routes in the Netherlands

28.4.2022 15:49  
Surveying with integrated equipment
Published: 
28 April 2022

An initiative in the Netherlands leverages Galileo’s enhanced accuracy and positioning to conduct a comprehensive safety assessment of local bicycle paths.

The Dutch love their bikes. In fact, according to a European Commission report on quality transportation, 36% of Dutch people say biking is their preferred method for getting around.

Bolstered by a robust cycling infrastructure, including dedicated paths, protected lanes, and plenty of bicycle parking, 27% of all travel in the Netherlands is done by bike. In cities like Amsterdam and Zwolle, this percentage is even higher.

But, as impressive as these figures may be, one biking-related statistic cannot be ignored: the number of cycling accidents. According to SafetyNL, nearly 50,000 cyclists were seriously injured in 2019. With cycling continuing to grow in popularity, this number will only increase – which is why the Dutch province of Noord-Brabant decided to conduct a trial for comprehensive safety assessment of its bicycle infrastructure.

Carried out in cooperation with Royal HaskoningDHV, BAM Infra Nederland and the Prisma Groep, the initiative used Galileo alongside other technologies to create detailed and comprehensive maps of the area’s bike paths. After assessing their status and analysing traffic safety, each path was given a unique safety score.

A more accurate picture

The inventory was created by equipping bikes and riders with sensors, accelerometers, LiDAR and cameras – and of course, Galileo-enabled GNSS receivers.

 Prisma Groep first trial for rider assistance

Prisma Groep first trial for rider assistance

 Backup sensors counts with GNSS, IMU, two velodyne scanners and five cameras

Backup sensors counts with GNSS, IMU, two velodyne scanners and five cameras

“Using Galileo means more visible satellites and thus increased signal continuity and availability,” says Erik van Duffelen, a project coordinator at the Prisma Groep. “This capability is particularly important in areas with limited line of sight, like bike paths that traverse through urban canyons or under dense tree canopies.”

As the cyclist rides around, the equipment scans the environment, capturing measurements and recording location. During post-processing, the captured data is analysed using artificial intelligence models and algorithms. The result forms the basis of a “digital twin” of the bicycle paths, which not only helps to update older maps, but also includes information about obstacles and other safety hazards. This can be used to improve cyclist safety and to inform future infrastructure development.

 Surveying with integrated equipments

Surveying with integrated equipments

“Galileo gave us a more accurate picture of the bicycle paths and a more precise inventory of the cycling infrastructure,” adds van Duffelen. “Thanks to this level of accuracy and precision, cyclists and authorities alike have the information they need to improve safety.”

 Sketch of the bicycles paths after processing data

Sketch of the bicycles paths after processing data

Following a successful pilot programme, the initiative has launched a comprehensive commercial service. Called BikePathfinder (FietsPadvinder; article in Dutch), the service is available to road authorities and other entities working to improve cycling infrastructure and safety.

FietsPadvinder logo

FietsPadvinder logo

To learn more about Galileo, its services and differentiators, please register at the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) or contact the GSC Helpdesk at www.gsc-europa.eu/helpdesk.

The authors would like to thank the Prisma Groep for their help in preparing this article.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Surveying with integrated equipment

PIN: European GNSS Service Demonstrator

26.4.2022 11:21  
EGNSS Service Demonstrator as the centralised platform for EGNSS demonstration capabilities
Published: 
26 April 2022

The European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) has issued a Prior Information Notice (PIN) for a planned call to develop the European GNSS Service Demonstrator (ESD) providing a centralised platform for the demonstration of new and enhanced end-to-end European Global Navigation Satellite System (EGNSS) services

The European Commission is currently specifying the long-term evolution of the EGNSS programme, including new services for Galileo and EGNOS. The European GNSS Service Demonstrator (ESD) will support Galileo and EGNOS evolution by providing a centralised platform for the demonstration of new and enhanced end-to-end EGNSS services.

The ESD shall deliver preoperational EGNSS signals and data that can be easily and openly accessed by users with the appropriate equipment to test the new/enhanced services in realistic conditions, validate the correct implementation of receiver interfaces and standards and anticipate and support the development of new applications.

The ESD will receive data from various sources (e.g. GNSS sensor station data) and rebroadcast data from various sources(e.g. SBAS DFMC data, high accuracy data); compute EGNSS data and corrections by providing a pre-operational DFMC SBAS open service signal (for non-safety of life usage) over Europe primarily, and potentially over a part of Africa; disseminate EGNSS data via various broadcast means (e.g. SiS through EGNOS GEOs, internet). The contractor may be requested to carry out additional activities such as developing additional kernels or integrating or interfacing with external kernels (e.g. high accuracy kernel, authentication kernel, emergency warning service kernel, internet of things kernel, OS-NMA evolution kernel, etc.). The scope of the procurement will also cover the provision of engineering support services.

More information about the Prior Information Notice (PIN) can be found here.

Read this: Space-based solutions set to address some of today’s most pressing challenges

Galileo is Europe’s Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) providing an accurate, guaranteed global positioning service under civilian control. Galileo is operational since the Initial Service declaration at the end of 2016. Beyond the classical positioning and timing services provided by all the existing GNSS providers, Galileo will provide new, advance services, such as the High Accuracy Service (HAS, an open access service based on the provision of precise corrections) and the Commercial Authentication Service (CAS, a controlled access service based on the encrypted spreading codes).

EGNOS is the European SBAS and augments GPS L1 C/A civilian signal by providing corrections and integrity information for positioning and navigation applications over Europe. EGNOS version 3, will in the near future augment both GPS and Galileo constellations in the L1 and L5 bands and will extend the service area to the entire landmasses of EU Member States. New EGNOS services could be implemented in further EGNOS releases.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EGNSS Service Demonstrator as the centralised platform for EGNSS demonstration capabilities

EUSPA: the gatekeeper to a secure EU Space Programme

21.4.2022 11:15  
EUSPA: the gatekeeper to a secure EU Space Programme
Published: 
21 April 2022

Speaking at CYSAT, EUSPA highlighted how its security apparatus helps protect the space-based data we depend on against malicious cyberattacks.

The number of critical services and everyday devices that depend on satellite-based data continues to increase. But with this increase comes new challenges – including cybersecurity.

Satellites have historically been designed to be reliable - but not necessarily secure. This, in combination with recent trends towards software-defined satellites, in-orbit reconfigurations, and quantum technologies, means space assets and data are now more vulnerable to cyberattacks than ever before.

“Ensuring the confidentiality, integrity and availability of space data against cyber threats is a new challenge that we simply cannot afford to ignore,” said Philippe Rosius, Head of Galileo Security Monitoring centre (GSMC) at the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA).

According to Rosius, who made his remarks at CYSAT (the European event dedicated to cybersecurity for the space industry) EUSPA is uniquely positioned to serve as the security gatekeeper of the EU Space Programme. “In addition to its service provision, EUSPA is responsible for ensuring that Europe’s GNSS signals are secure,” he said. “It also provides security expertise and support for the Space Programme’s other components, including GOVSATCOM, as well as to various European Commission initiatives.”

Specifically, the EUSPA security organisation provides the cybersecurity and engineering competence for all programme components. “Our security engineering and cybersecurity work defines and implements the security requirements related to the services, the systems, and their operations,” explained Rosius.

The Security Authority also oversees the operational security of European GNSS (Galileo and EGNOS). “Here our work focuses on ensuring that the systems in operation comply with the general security requirements established using a threat and risk analysis,” added Rosius.

An integral part of the Galileo infrastructure

Security monitoring is done by the Galileo Security Monitoring Centre (GSMC).

“The GSMC is an integral part of the Galileo infrastructure and has the competence to be extended to other Space Programme’s components,” said Rosius.

From its sites in France and Spain, the GSMC monitors and, when necessary, takes action regarding security threats, security alerts and the operational status of Galileo’s various components. It is also responsible for managing access to the Public Regulated Service (PRS) and ensures that sensitive information relating to its use is properly managed and protected.

“In the event of a security threat to the security of systems and services deployed, operated and used under the Union Space Programme which may affect the security of the Union, the European Council issues specific instructions to EUSPA, which the GSMC is responsible for implementing,” explained Rosius.

The EU Space Programme’s security accreditation authority

If the Security authority and GSMC make EUSPA the security gatekeeper of the EU Space Programme, then security assurance is finally ensured by the Security Accreditation Board (SAB). “The SAB is the security accreditation authority for all of the EU Space Programme’s components,” said SAB Chair Bruno Vermeire, who also spoke during CYSAT. “In this role, it ensures that all systems comply with the relevant security requirements, including Cyber and Supply Chain, and provides statements of approval to operate for the systems and services.”

An independent body within EUSPA, the SAB is composed of a representative from each Member State, the Commission and from the High Representative for the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy. The Board is charged with:

  • Defining and approving security accreditation strategies
  • Approving satellite launches
  • Authorising the operation of systems in different configurations and for various services
  • Authorising the operation of ground stations
  • Authorising bodies to develop or manufacture sensitive PRS technologies, receivers and security modules
  • Endorsing the selection of approved products
  • Approving interconnections between systems

The SAB makes its decisions in an independent manner, including in regard to the Commission and other bodies responsible for implementing the components and provision of service.

“Thanks to this robust security apparatus, EUSPA is at the front lines of cybersecurity, providing end users with the confidence of knowing that the space-derived data they depend on is safe and secure,” concluded Vermeire. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EUSPA: the gatekeeper to a secure EU Space Programme

GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Meeting: Registration now open!

13.4.2022 16:42  
The GNSS Task Force Meeting brings stakeholders together to discuss experience around raw measurement use.
Published: 
13 April 2022

Registration is now open for the fifth GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force meeting, which will take place on 17 May 2022. Participants in the event, which will be held online, will gain access to Task Force members’ experience and learn about progress around the use of raw measurements in Android devices. Interested? Register here.

The aim of the EUSPA’s Raw Measurements Task Force is to bridge the knowledge gap between raw measurement users. The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force meetings are a key element in this effort, providing a forum for stakeholders to share experience and knowledge around raw measurements use.

A full agenda

Starting in the afternoon, following a welcome address from the EUSPA’s Head of Market, Downstream and Innovation (MADI) Department Fiammetta Diani, the opening session of the meeting will include a keynote presentation from Google`s Frank Van Diggelen and Mohammed Khider. Then, update on EGNSS opportunities and other useful information coming from the Galileo programme given by the members of the MADI team will follow.

After the break, the agenda will be fully dedicated to presentations from Task Force members, targeting their innovative work using raw measurements. Finally, during the last session, the presentations focusing on latest testing results and implementation of EGNSS differentiators will follow. For the full draft agenda, click here.

Join the Task Force

The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force is dedicated to promoting a better and wider use of GNSS raw measurements.

Since its launch in 2017, the Task Force has expanded from a handful of experts to a community of over 100 agencies, universities, research institutes and companies. Membership is open to anybody interested in GNSS raw measurements. To join the Task Force contact: market@euspa.europa.eu.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The GNSS Task Force Meeting brings stakeholders together to discuss experience around raw measurement use.

GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Meeting: Registration now open!

13.4.2022 16:42  
The GNSS Task Force Workshop brings stakeholders together to discuss experience around raw measurement use.
Published: 
13 April 2022

Registration is now open for the fifth GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force meeting, which will take place on 17 May 2022. Participants in the event, which will be held online, will gain access to Task Force members’ experience and learn about progress around the use of raw measurements in Android devices. Interested? Register here.

The aim of the GSA’s Raw Measurements Task Force is to bridge the knowledge gap between raw measurement users. The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force meetings are a key element in this effort, providing a forum for stakeholders to share experience and knowledge around raw measurements use.

A full agenda

Starting in the afternoon, following a welcome address from the EUSPA’s Head of Market, Downstream and Innovation (MADI) Department Fiammetta Diani, the opening session of the workshop will include a keynote presentation from Google`s Frank Van Diggelen and Mohammed Khider. Then, update on EGNSS opportunities and other useful information coming from the Galileo programme given by the members of the MADI team will follow.

After the break, the agenda will be fully dedicated to presentations from Task Force members, targeting their innovative work using raw measurements. Finally, during the last session, the presentations focusing on latest testing results and implementation of EGNSS differentiators will follow. For the full draft agenda, click here.

Join the Task Force

The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force is dedicated to promoting a better and wider use of GNSS raw measurements.

Since its launch in 2017, the Task Force has expanded from a handful of experts to a community of over 100 agencies, universities, research institutes and companies. Membership is open to anybody interested in GNSS raw measurements. To join the Task Force contact: market@euspa.europa.eu.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The GNSS Task Force Workshop brings stakeholders together to discuss experience around raw measurement use.

GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Meeting: Registration now open!

13.4.2022 16:42  
The GNSS Task Force Workshop brings stakeholders together to discuss experience around raw measurement use.
Published: 
13 April 2022

Registration is now open for the fifth GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force meeting, which will take place on 17 May 2022. Participants in the event, which will be held online, will gain access to Task Force members’ experience and learn about progress around the use of raw measurements in Android devices. Interested? Register here.

The aim of the EUSPA’s Raw Measurements Task Force is to bridge the knowledge gap between raw measurement users. The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force meetings are a key element in this effort, providing a forum for stakeholders to share experience and knowledge around raw measurements use.

A full agenda

Starting in the afternoon, following a welcome address from the EUSPA’s Head of Market, Downstream and Innovation (MADI) Department Fiammetta Diani, the opening session of the workshop will include a keynote presentation from Google`s Frank Van Diggelen and Mohammed Khider. Then, update on EGNSS opportunities and other useful information coming from the Galileo programme given by the members of the MADI team will follow.

After the break, the agenda will be fully dedicated to presentations from Task Force members, targeting their innovative work using raw measurements. Finally, during the last session, the presentations focusing on latest testing results and implementation of EGNSS differentiators will follow. For the full draft agenda, click here.

Join the Task Force

The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force is dedicated to promoting a better and wider use of GNSS raw measurements.

Since its launch in 2017, the Task Force has expanded from a handful of experts to a community of over 100 agencies, universities, research institutes and companies. Membership is open to anybody interested in GNSS raw measurements. To join the Task Force contact: market@euspa.europa.eu.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The GNSS Task Force Workshop brings stakeholders together to discuss experience around raw measurement use.

GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force Meeting: Registration now open!

13.4.2022 16:42  
The GNSS Task Force Meeting brings stakeholders together to discuss experience around raw measurement use.
Published: 
13 April 2022

Registration is now open for the fifth GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force meeting, which will take place on 17 May 2022. Participants in the event, which will be held online, will gain access to Task Force members’ experience and learn about progress around the use of raw measurements in Android devices. Interested? Register here.

The aim of the EUSPA’s Raw Measurements Task Force is to bridge the knowledge gap between raw measurement users. The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force meetings are a key element in this effort, providing a forum for stakeholders to share experience and knowledge around raw measurements use.

A full agenda

Starting in the afternoon, following a welcome address from the EUSPA’s Head of Market, Downstream and Innovation (MADI) Department Fiammetta Diani, the opening session of the meeting will include a keynote presentation from Google`s Frank Van Diggelen and Mohammed Khider. Then, update on EGNSS opportunities and other useful information coming from the Galileo programme given by the members of the MADI team will follow.

After the break, the agenda will be fully dedicated to presentations from Task Force members, targeting their innovative work using raw measurements. Finally, during the last session, the presentations focusing on latest testing results and implementation of EGNSS differentiators will follow. For the full draft agenda, click here.

Join the Task Force

The GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force is dedicated to promoting a better and wider use of GNSS raw measurements.

Since its launch in 2017, the Task Force has expanded from a handful of experts to a community of over 100 agencies, universities, research institutes and companies. Membership is open to anybody interested in GNSS raw measurements. To join the Task Force contact: market@euspa.europa.eu.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The GNSS Task Force Meeting brings stakeholders together to discuss experience around raw measurement use.

Galileo positions e-bike sharing programme as a game changer in urban mobility

12.4.2022 12:54  
Each AMBici bike will be equipped with a Galileo-enabled GNSS receiver.
Published: 
12 April 2022

A new electric bike sharing programme in the Barcelona metropolitan area will use Galileo’s highly accurate positioning and timing information.

In Barcelona, bike sharing is set to go electric as the metropolitan area prepares to rollout a fleet of state-of-the-art electric bicycles – making it even easier for the public to travel in a sustainable, healthy and economical way.

Called AMBici, the electric bikes will complement existing bike sharing programmes, such as Barcelona’s Bicing system, and further integrate the metro area’s public transportation network. Led by the Àrea Metropolitana de Barcelona (AMB) and managed by Transports Metropolitana de Barcelona (TMB), the programme will consist of 2,600 electric bikes and 236 docking stations located across 15 area municipalities.

To ensure that the bicycles are evenly distributed and readily available in high-use areas, each bike will be equipped with a Galileo-enabled GNSS receiver. The highly accurate positioning that Galileo provides will also support cyclists as they navigate their way from docking station to destination.

“Because using Galileo means greater precision regarding positioning and timing information, it has the potential to exponentially enhance the quality of urban mobility services,” explains Josep Laborda, ARIADNA project coordinator.

ARIADNA is a Horizon 2020 project funded by the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) dedicated to supporting the adoption of European GNSS (EGNSS) for mobility services. The project focuses on educating urban mobility stakeholders about how EGNSS can be used to enable integrated transportation networks.

“The AMBici initiative is a perfect example of how cutting-edge technologies like EGNSS are key to boosting multimodality, encouraging active transportation and building smart and sustainable urban transport networks,” adds Laborda.

The AMBici programme will be implemented, operated, maintained and managed by a private service provider selected via an open public tender with a budget of EUR 60.8 million. The contract is expected to be awarded in June of this year.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Each AMBici bike will be equipped with a Galileo-enabled GNSS receiver.

Galileo positions e-bike sharing programme as a game changer in urban mobility

12.4.2022 12:54  
Each AMBici bike will be equipped with a Galileo-enabled GNSS receiver.
Published: 
12 April 2022

A new electric bike sharing programme in the Barcelona metropolitan area will use Galileo’s highly accurate positioning and timing information.

In Barcelona, bike sharing is set to go electric as the metropolitan area prepares to rollout a fleet of state-of-the-art electric bicycles – making it even easier for the public to travel in a sustainable, healthy and economical way.

Called AMBici, the electric bikes will complement existing bike sharing programmes, such as Barcelona’s Bicing system, and further integrate the metro area’s public transportation network. Led by the Àrea Metropolitana de Barcelona (AMB) and managed by Transports Metropolitana de Barcelona (TMB), the programme will consist of 2,600 electric bikes and 236 docking stations located across 15 area municipalities.

To ensure that the bicycles are evenly distributed and readily available in high-use areas, each bike will be equipped with a Galileo-enabled GNSS receiver. The highly accurate positioning that Galileo provides will also support cyclists as they navigate their way from docking station to destination.

“Because using Galileo means greater precision regarding positioning and timing information, it has the potential to exponentially enhance the quality of urban mobility services,” explains Josep Laborda, ARIADNA project coordinator.

ARIADNA is a Horizon 2020 project funded by the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) dedicated to supporting the adoption of European GNSS (EGNSS) for mobility services. The project focuses on educating urban mobility stakeholders about how EGNSS can be used to enable integrated transportation networks.

“The AMBici initiative is a perfect example of how cutting-edge technologies like EGNSS are key to boosting multimodality, encouraging active transportation and building smart and sustainable urban transport networks,” adds Laborda.

The AMBici programme will be implemented, operated, maintained and managed by a private service provider selected via an open public tender with a budget of EUR 60.8 million. The contract is expected to be awarded in June of this year.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Each AMBici bike will be equipped with a Galileo-enabled GNSS receiver.

Galileo positions e-bike sharing programme as a game changer in urban mobility

12.4.2022 12:54  
Each AMBici bike will be equipped with a Galileo-enabled GNSS receiver.
Published: 
12 April 2022

A new electric bike sharing programme in the Barcelona metropolitan area will use Galileo’s highly accurate positioning and timing information.

In Barcelona, bike sharing is set to go electric as the metropolitan area prepares to rollout a fleet of state-of-the-art electric bicycles – making it even easier for the public to travel in a sustainable, healthy and economical way.

Called AMBici, the electric bikes will complement existing bike sharing programmes, such as Barcelona’s Bicing system, and further integrate the metro area’s public transportation network. Led by the Àrea Metropolitana de Barcelona (AMB) and managed by Transports Metropolitana de Barcelona (TMB), the programme will consist of 2,600 electric bikes and 236 docking stations located across 15 area municipalities.

To ensure that the bicycles are evenly distributed and readily available in high-use areas, each bike will be equipped with a Galileo-enabled GNSS receiver. The highly accurate positioning that Galileo provides will also support cyclists as they navigate their way from docking station to destination.

“Because using Galileo means greater precision regarding positioning and timing information, it has the potential to exponentially enhance the quality of urban mobility services,” explains Josep Laborda, ARIADNA project coordinator.

ARIADNA is a Horizon 2020 project funded by the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) dedicated to supporting the adoption of European GNSS (EGNSS) for mobility services. The project focuses on educating urban mobility stakeholders about how EGNSS can be used to enable integrated transportation networks.

“The AMBici initiative is a perfect example of how cutting-edge technologies like EGNSS are key to boosting multimodality, encouraging active transportation and building smart and sustainable urban transport networks,” adds Laborda.

The AMBici programme will be implemented, operated, maintained and managed by a private service provider selected via an open public tender with a budget of EUR 60.8 million. The contract is expected to be awarded in June of this year.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Each AMBici bike will be equipped with a Galileo-enabled GNSS receiver.

How the EU Space Programme helps address the new challenges of a changing Arctic

8.4.2022 12:51  
The smallest of the earth’s five major oceans, the Arctic is almost twice the size of Australia, covering 14 million square kilometers
Published: 
08 April 2022

Polar regions are faced with emerging challenges. Climate change is affecting the entire globe, but it is especially pronounced at the poles. With an integrated EU Space Programme in place, Europe has the capacity to better understand the challenges the Arctic Circle is confronted with, shape new mitigating policies and develop the necessary tools to fight climate change.

With nearly half the country sitting north of the Arctic Circle, Norway has a front row seat to the unprecedented changes taking place in this polar region. Climate change is causing temperatures in the Arctic Circle to rise twice as fast as anywhere else on the planet. As the ice melts, the Arctic Ocean is opening and shipping companies are moving in. According to the Arctic Council, ship traffic in the area grew by 25% between 2013 and 2019.

It was also in this context that EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa, delivered a keynote speech at the Oslo Position Conference 2022. His visit to the Norwegian capital was a great opportunity to confer with Jan Christian Vestre Minister of Trade, Industry and Fisheries, on the huge potential of EU Space across 17 markets. Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) & Earth Observation (EO) revenues are expected to reach 500 billion by 2031. Besides, Norway has been supporting European innovation with several H2020 funded projects such as Prepare Ships. Da Costa also met with Norwegian Space Agency leadership and members of the Norwegian Parliament’s Standing Committee on Business and Industry to give an overview of how the Arctic stands to benefit from the EU Space Programme.

Increased maritime traffic in this remote polar region, in combination with more unpredictable and extreme weather events, raises many new challenges”, said EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. “In the event of a ship running aground or a collision, search and rescue crews have to navigate rough seas, freezing temperatures and vast spaces in order to evacuate the vessel and provide emergency services.

This is where Galileo comes into play.

Galileo supports search and rescue operations Galileo, Europe’s GNSS, provides improved positioning and timing information to a range of users – including search and rescue (SAR) teams.

Galileo’s SAR service contributes to life-saving efforts by swiftly relaying radio beacon distress signals to the relevant SAR crews by means of dedicated payloads onboard Galileo satellites, supported by three ground stations strategically deployed across Europe. But what really sets the Galileo SAR service apart is its unique Return Link Service (RLS) – a feature that allows people in distress to receive an automatic acknowledgement that their signal has been picked up by emergency first responders.

The Galileo SAR service is fully integrated into the Cospas-Sarsat system, a non-profit satellite-based search and rescue distress alert detection and information distribution system. The SAR transponder on the Galileo satellites picks up signals emitted from distress beacons in the 406 – 406.1 MHz band. It then broadcasts this information to dedicated ground stations called MEOLUTS, which use the signals to generate an independent location of the beacon. This location is then relayed to first responders through dedicated Cospas-Sarsat Mission Control Centres.

In Case You Missed It: EUSPA celebrates ‘406Day’.

Because it offers greater coverage in higher latitudes and thus a more robust performance, Galileo brings particularly important added value to Arctic SAR operations – value which was on full display during a large-scale rescue exercise that took place in the Artic Circle last year. Following the activation of the onboard distress signal, the Galileo SAR service was able to track the ship’s location in just 2 minutes and 20 seconds and with an accuracy of under one kilometre.

Safe navigation, environmental protection and mitigating climate change

But Galileo isn’t the only EU Space Programme benefiting the Arctic. The Copernicus Earth Observation programme’s Marine service provides ship captains and search and rescue teams with essential data on wave height and direction and the presence of sea ice, for example. And ships of all sizes rely on the accurate positioning provided by Galileo to safely navigate across these remote waters.

Furthermore, as the Arctic sees more ship traffic, the risk of environmental catastrophes, such as oil spills, increases. Here, Copernicus satellites can provide optical and synthetic aperture radar images which, combined with accurate positioning from Galileo, allow authorities to quickly reach the spill site, understand the extent of the risk, and implement necessary actions.

The EU Space Programme also plays an important role in mitigating how climate change impacts the Nordic environment. On the one hand, the accurate navigation offered by Galileo and EGNOS can optimise shipping routes to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and fuel consumption. On the other hand, the Copernicus Marine and Climate Change Services monitor a number of key climate indicators, such as sea level, temperature, currents and salinity. This data can then be used to drive global climate policy decisions.

Read More: The world has a water problem, and space may have a solution

All the benefits that the EU Space Programme brings to the Arctic region are highlighted in a short film produced by EUSPA, which was premiered for the Norwegian Space Agency. “Protecting the Arctic and its many ecosystems are an important component of the EU Green Deal,” said da Costa while introducing the film. “Through an integrated EU Space Programme and by working closely with our partners in the Arctic like NOSA, we are better-positioned to understand the challenges, find solutions and implement change.

 

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The smallest of the earth’s five major oceans, the Arctic is almost twice the size of Australia, covering 14 million square kilometers

How the EU Space Programme helps address the new challenges of a changing Arctic

8.4.2022 12:51  
Published: 
08 April 2022

 

 

 

Polar regions are faced with emerging challenges. Climate change is affecting the entire globe, but it is especially pronounced at the poles. With an integrated EU Space Programme in place, Europe has the capacity to better understand the challenges the Arctic Circle is confronted with, shape new mitigating policies and develop the necessary tools to fight climate change.

With nearly half the country sitting north of the Arctic Circle, Norway has a front row seat to the unprecedented changes taking place in this polar region. Climate change is causing temperatures in the Arctic Circle to rise twice as fast as anywhere else on the planet. As the ice melts, the Arctic Ocean is opening and shipping companies are moving in. According to the Arctic Council, ship traffic in the area grew by 25% between 2013 and 2019.

It was also in this context that EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa, delivered a keynote speech at the Oslo Position Conference 2022. His visit to the Norwegian capital was a great opportunity to confer with Jan Christian Vestre Minister of Trade, Industry and Fisheries, on the huge potential of EU Space across 17 markets. Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) & Earth Observation (EO) revenues are expected to reach 500 billion by 2031. Besides, Norway has been supporting European innovation with several H2020 funded projects such as Prepare Ships. Da Costa also met with Norwegian Space Agency leadership and members of the Norwegian Parliament’s Standing Committee on Business and Industry to give an overview of how the Arctic stands to benefit from the EU Space Programme.

Increased maritime traffic in this remote polar region, in combination with more unpredictable and extreme weather events, raises many new challenges”, said EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. “In the event of a ship running aground or a collision, search and rescue crews have to navigate rough seas, freezing temperatures and vast spaces in order to evacuate the vessel and provide emergency services.

This is where Galileo comes into play.

Galileo supports search and rescue operations Galileo, Europe’s GNSS, provides improved positioning and timing information to a range of users – including search and rescue (SAR) teams.

Galileo’s SAR service contributes to life-saving efforts by swiftly relaying radio beacon distress signals to the relevant SAR crews by means of dedicated payloads onboard Galileo satellites, supported by three ground stations strategically deployed across Europe. But what really sets the Galileo SAR service apart is its unique Return Link Service (RLS) – a feature that allows people in distress to receive an automatic acknowledgement that their signal has been picked up by emergency first responders.

The Galileo SAR service is fully integrated into the Cospas-Sarsat system, a non-profit satellite-based search and rescue distress alert detection and information distribution system. The SAR transponder on the Galileo satellites picks up signals emitted from distress beacons in the 406 – 406.1 MHz band. It then broadcasts this information to dedicated ground stations called MEOLUTS, which use the signals to generate an independent location of the beacon. This location is then relayed to first responders through dedicated Cospas-Sarsat Mission Control Centres.

In Case You Missed It: EUSPA celebrates ‘406Day’.

Because it offers greater coverage in higher latitudes and thus a more robust performance, Galileo brings particularly important added value to Arctic SAR operations – value which was on full display during a large-scale rescue exercise that took place in the Artic Circle last year. Following the activation of the onboard distress signal, the Galileo SAR service was able to track the ship’s location in just 2 minutes and 20 seconds and with an accuracy of under one kilometre.

Safe navigation, environmental protection and mitigating climate change

But Galileo isn’t the only EU Space Programme benefiting the Arctic. The Copernicus Earth Observation programme’s Marine service provides ship captains and search and rescue teams with essential data on wave height and direction and the presence of sea ice, for example. And ships of all sizes rely on the accurate positioning provided by Galileo to safely navigate across these remote waters.

Furthermore, as the Arctic sees more ship traffic, the risk of environmental catastrophes, such as oil spills, increases. Here, Copernicus satellites can provide optical and synthetic aperture radar images which, combined with accurate positioning from Galileo, allow authorities to quickly reach the spill site, understand the extent of the risk, and implement necessary actions.

The EU Space Programme also plays an important role in mitigating how climate change impacts the Nordic environment. On the one hand, the accurate navigation offered by Galileo and EGNOS can optimise shipping routes to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and fuel consumption. On the other hand, the Copernicus Marine and Climate Change Services monitor a number of key climate indicators, such as sea level, temperature, currents and salinity. This data can then be used to drive global climate policy decisions.

Read More: The world has a water problem, and space may have a solution

All the benefits that the EU Space Programme brings to the Arctic region are highlighted in a short film produced by EUSPA, which was premiered for the Norwegian Space Agency. “Protecting the Arctic and its many ecosystems are an important component of the EU Green Deal,” said da Costa while introducing the film. “Through an integrated EU Space Programme and by working closely with our partners in the Arctic like NOSA, we are better-positioned to understand the challenges, find solutions and implement change.” Insertion of video for now

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

How the EU Space Programme helps address the new challenges of a changing Arctic

8.4.2022 12:51  
Published: 
08 April 2022

Polar regions are faced with emerging challenges. Climate change is affecting the entire globe, but it is especially pronounced at the poles. With an integrated EU Space Programme in place, Europe has the capacity to better understand the challenges the Arctic Circle is confronted with, shape new mitigating policies and develop the necessary tools to fight climate change.

With nearly half the country sitting north of the Arctic Circle, Norway has a front row seat to the unprecedented changes taking place in this polar region. Climate change is causing temperatures in the Arctic Circle to rise twice as fast as anywhere else on the planet. As the ice melts, the Arctic Ocean is opening and shipping companies are moving in. According to the Arctic Council, ship traffic in the area grew by 25% between 2013 and 2019.

It was also in this context that EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa, delivered a keynote speech at the Oslo Position Conference 2022. His visit to the Norwegian capital was a great opportunity to confer with Jan Christian Vestre Minister of Trade, Industry and Fisheries, on the huge potential of EU Space across 17 markets. Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) & Earth Observation (EO) revenues are expected to reach 500 billion by 2031. Besides, Norway has been supporting European innovation with several H2020 funded projects such as Prepare Ships. Da Costa also met with Norwegian Space Agency leadership and members of the Norwegian Parliament’s Standing Committee on Business and Industry to give an overview of how the Arctic stands to benefit from the EU Space Programme.

Increased maritime traffic in this remote polar region, in combination with more unpredictable and extreme weather events, raises many new challenges”, said EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. “In the event of a ship running aground or a collision, search and rescue crews have to navigate rough seas, freezing temperatures and vast spaces in order to evacuate the vessel and provide emergency services.

This is where Galileo comes into play.

Galileo supports search and rescue operations Galileo, Europe’s GNSS, provides improved positioning and timing information to a range of users – including search and rescue (SAR) teams.

Galileo’s SAR service contributes to life-saving efforts by swiftly relaying radio beacon distress signals to the relevant SAR crews by means of dedicated payloads onboard Galileo satellites, supported by three ground stations strategically deployed across Europe. But what really sets the Galileo SAR service apart is its unique Return Link Service (RLS) – a feature that allows people in distress to receive an automatic acknowledgement that their signal has been picked up by emergency first responders.

The Galileo SAR service is fully integrated into the Cospas-Sarsat system, a non-profit satellite-based search and rescue distress alert detection and information distribution system. The SAR transponder on the Galileo satellites picks up signals emitted from distress beacons in the 406 – 406.1 MHz band. It then broadcasts this information to dedicated ground stations called MEOLUTS, which use the signals to generate an independent location of the beacon. This location is then relayed to first responders through dedicated Cospas-Sarsat Mission Control Centres.

In Case You Missed It: EUSPA celebrates ‘406Day’.

Because it offers greater coverage in higher latitudes and thus a more robust performance, Galileo brings particularly important added value to Arctic SAR operations – value which was on full display during a large-scale rescue exercise that took place in the Artic Circle last year. Following the activation of the onboard distress signal, the Galileo SAR service was able to track the ship’s location in just 2 minutes and 20 seconds and with an accuracy of under one kilometre.

Safe navigation, environmental protection and mitigating climate change

But Galileo isn’t the only EU Space Programme benefiting the Arctic. The Copernicus Earth Observation programme’s Marine service provides ship captains and search and rescue teams with essential data on wave height and direction and the presence of sea ice, for example. And ships of all sizes rely on the accurate positioning provided by Galileo to safely navigate across these remote waters.

Furthermore, as the Arctic sees more ship traffic, the risk of environmental catastrophes, such as oil spills, increases. Here, Copernicus satellites can provide optical and synthetic aperture radar images which, combined with accurate positioning from Galileo, allow authorities to quickly reach the spill site, understand the extent of the risk, and implement necessary actions.

The EU Space Programme also plays an important role in mitigating how climate change impacts the Nordic environment. On the one hand, the accurate navigation offered by Galileo and EGNOS can optimise shipping routes to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and fuel consumption. On the other hand, the Copernicus Marine and Climate Change Services monitor a number of key climate indicators, such as sea level, temperature, currents and salinity. This data can then be used to drive global climate policy decisions.

Read More: The world has a water problem, and space may have a solution

All the benefits that the EU Space Programme brings to the Arctic region are highlighted in a short film produced by EUSPA, which was premiered for the Norwegian Space Agency. “Protecting the Arctic and its many ecosystems are an important component of the EU Green Deal,” said da Costa while introducing the film. “Through an integrated EU Space Programme and by working closely with our partners in the Arctic like NOSA, we are better-positioned to understand the challenges, find solutions and implement change.” Insertion of video for now

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

How the EU Space Programme helps address the new challenges of a changing Arctic

8.4.2022 12:51  
Published: 
08 April 2022

 

 

Polar regions are faced with emerging challenges. Climate change is affecting the entire globe, but it is especially pronounced at the poles. With an integrated EU Space Programme in place, Europe has the capacity to better understand the challenges the Arctic Circle is confronted with, shape new mitigating policies and develop the necessary tools to fight climate change.

With nearly half the country sitting north of the Arctic Circle, Norway has a front row seat to the unprecedented changes taking place in this polar region. Climate change is causing temperatures in the Arctic Circle to rise twice as fast as anywhere else on the planet. As the ice melts, the Arctic Ocean is opening and shipping companies are moving in. According to the Arctic Council, ship traffic in the area grew by 25% between 2013 and 2019.

It was also in this context that EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa, delivered a keynote speech at the Oslo Position Conference 2022. His visit to the Norwegian capital was a great opportunity to confer with Jan Christian Vestre Minister of Trade, Industry and Fisheries, on the huge potential of EU Space across 17 markets. Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) & Earth Observation (EO) revenues are expected to reach 500 billion by 2031. Besides, Norway has been supporting European innovation with several H2020 funded projects such as Prepare Ships. Da Costa also met with Norwegian Space Agency leadership and members of the Norwegian Parliament’s Standing Committee on Business and Industry to give an overview of how the Arctic stands to benefit from the EU Space Programme.

Increased maritime traffic in this remote polar region, in combination with more unpredictable and extreme weather events, raises many new challenges”, said EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. “In the event of a ship running aground or a collision, search and rescue crews have to navigate rough seas, freezing temperatures and vast spaces in order to evacuate the vessel and provide emergency services.

This is where Galileo comes into play.

Galileo supports search and rescue operations Galileo, Europe’s GNSS, provides improved positioning and timing information to a range of users – including search and rescue (SAR) teams.

Galileo’s SAR service contributes to life-saving efforts by swiftly relaying radio beacon distress signals to the relevant SAR crews by means of dedicated payloads onboard Galileo satellites, supported by three ground stations strategically deployed across Europe. But what really sets the Galileo SAR service apart is its unique Return Link Service (RLS) – a feature that allows people in distress to receive an automatic acknowledgement that their signal has been picked up by emergency first responders.

The Galileo SAR service is fully integrated into the Cospas-Sarsat system, a non-profit satellite-based search and rescue distress alert detection and information distribution system. The SAR transponder on the Galileo satellites picks up signals emitted from distress beacons in the 406 – 406.1 MHz band. It then broadcasts this information to dedicated ground stations called MEOLUTS, which use the signals to generate an independent location of the beacon. This location is then relayed to first responders through dedicated Cospas-Sarsat Mission Control Centres.

In Case You Missed It: EUSPA celebrates ‘406Day’.

Because it offers greater coverage in higher latitudes and thus a more robust performance, Galileo brings particularly important added value to Arctic SAR operations – value which was on full display during a large-scale rescue exercise that took place in the Artic Circle last year. Following the activation of the onboard distress signal, the Galileo SAR service was able to track the ship’s location in just 2 minutes and 20 seconds and with an accuracy of under one kilometre.

Safe navigation, environmental protection and mitigating climate change

But Galileo isn’t the only EU Space Programme benefiting the Arctic. The Copernicus Earth Observation programme’s Marine service provides ship captains and search and rescue teams with essential data on wave height and direction and the presence of sea ice, for example. And ships of all sizes rely on the accurate positioning provided by Galileo to safely navigate across these remote waters.

Furthermore, as the Arctic sees more ship traffic, the risk of environmental catastrophes, such as oil spills, increases. Here, Copernicus satellites can provide optical and synthetic aperture radar images which, combined with accurate positioning from Galileo, allow authorities to quickly reach the spill site, understand the extent of the risk, and implement necessary actions.

The EU Space Programme also plays an important role in mitigating how climate change impacts the Nordic environment. On the one hand, the accurate navigation offered by Galileo and EGNOS can optimise shipping routes to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and fuel consumption. On the other hand, the Copernicus Marine and Climate Change Services monitor a number of key climate indicators, such as sea level, temperature, currents and salinity. This data can then be used to drive global climate policy decisions.

Read More: The world has a water problem, and space may have a solution

All the benefits that the EU Space Programme brings to the Arctic region are highlighted in a short film produced by EUSPA, which was premiered for the Norwegian Space Agency. “Protecting the Arctic and its many ecosystems are an important component of the EU Green Deal,” said da Costa while introducing the film. “Through an integrated EU Space Programme and by working closely with our partners in the Arctic like NOSA, we are better-positioned to understand the challenges, find solutions and implement change.” Insertion of video for now

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

How the EU Space Programme helps address the new challenges of a changing Arctic

8.4.2022 12:51  
The smallest of the earth’s five major oceans, the Arctic is almost twice the size of Australia, covering 14 million square kilometers
Published: 
08 April 2022

Polar regions are faced with emerging challenges. Climate change is affecting the entire globe, but it is especially pronounced at the poles. With an integrated EU Space Programme in place, Europe has the capacity to better understand the challenges the Arctic Circle is confronted with, shape new mitigating policies and develop the necessary tools to fight climate change.

With nearly half the country sitting north of the Arctic Circle, Norway has a front row seat to the unprecedented changes taking place in this polar region. Climate change is causing temperatures in the Arctic Circle to rise twice as fast as anywhere else on the planet. As the ice melts, the Arctic Ocean is opening and shipping companies are moving in. According to the Arctic Council, ship traffic in the area grew by 25% between 2013 and 2019.

It was also in this context that EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa, delivered a keynote speech at the Oslo Position Conference 2022. His visit to the Norwegian capital was a great opportunity to confer with Jan Christian Vestre Minister of Trade, Industry and Fisheries, on the huge potential of EU Space across 17 markets. Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) & Earth Observation (EO) revenues are expected to reach 500 billion by 2031. Besides, Norway has been supporting European innovation with several H2020 funded projects such as Prepare Ships. Da Costa also met with Norwegian Space Agency leadership and members of the Norwegian Parliament’s Standing Committee on Business and Industry to give an overview of how the Arctic stands to benefit from the EU Space Programme.

Increased maritime traffic in this remote polar region, in combination with more unpredictable and extreme weather events, raises many new challenges”, said EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. “In the event of a ship running aground or a collision, search and rescue crews have to navigate rough seas, freezing temperatures and vast spaces in order to evacuate the vessel and provide emergency services.

This is where Galileo comes into play.

Galileo supports search and rescue operations Galileo, Europe’s GNSS, provides improved positioning and timing information to a range of users – including search and rescue (SAR) teams.

Galileo’s SAR service contributes to life-saving efforts by swiftly relaying radio beacon distress signals to the relevant SAR crews by means of dedicated payloads onboard Galileo satellites, supported by three ground stations strategically deployed across Europe. But what really sets the Galileo SAR service apart is its unique Return Link Service (RLS) – a feature that allows people in distress to receive an automatic acknowledgement that their signal has been picked up by emergency first responders.

The Galileo SAR service is fully integrated into the Cospas-Sarsat system, a non-profit satellite-based search and rescue distress alert detection and information distribution system. The SAR transponder on the Galileo satellites picks up signals emitted from distress beacons in the 406 – 406.1 MHz band. It then broadcasts this information to dedicated ground stations called MEOLUTS, which use the signals to generate an independent location of the beacon. This location is then relayed to first responders through dedicated Cospas-Sarsat Mission Control Centres.

In Case You Missed It: EUSPA celebrates ‘406Day’.

Because it offers greater coverage in higher latitudes and thus a more robust performance, Galileo brings particularly important added value to Arctic SAR operations – value which was on full display during a large-scale rescue exercise that took place in the Artic Circle last year. Following the activation of the onboard distress signal, the Galileo SAR service was able to track the ship’s location in just 2 minutes and 20 seconds and with an accuracy of under one kilometre.

Safe navigation, environmental protection and mitigating climate change

But Galileo isn’t the only EU Space Programme benefiting the Arctic. The Copernicus Earth Observation programme’s Marine service provides ship captains and search and rescue teams with essential data on wave height and direction and the presence of sea ice, for example. And ships of all sizes rely on the accurate positioning provided by Galileo to safely navigate across these remote waters.

Furthermore, as the Arctic sees more ship traffic, the risk of environmental catastrophes, such as oil spills, increases. Here, Copernicus satellites can provide optical and synthetic aperture radar images which, combined with accurate positioning from Galileo, allow authorities to quickly reach the spill site, understand the extent of the risk, and implement necessary actions.

The EU Space Programme also plays an important role in mitigating how climate change impacts the Nordic environment. On the one hand, the accurate navigation offered by Galileo and EGNOS can optimise shipping routes to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and fuel consumption. On the other hand, the Copernicus Marine and Climate Change Services monitor a number of key climate indicators, such as sea level, temperature, currents and salinity. This data can then be used to drive global climate policy decisions.

Read More: The world has a water problem, and space may have a solution

All the benefits that the EU Space Programme brings to the Arctic region are highlighted in a short film produced by EUSPA, which was premiered for the Norwegian Space Agency. “Protecting the Arctic and its many ecosystems are an important component of the EU Green Deal,” said da Costa while introducing the film. “Through an integrated EU Space Programme and by working closely with our partners in the Arctic like NOSA, we are better-positioned to understand the challenges, find solutions and implement change.

 

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The smallest of the earth’s five major oceans, the Arctic is almost twice the size of Australia, covering 14 million square kilometers

EUSPA celebrates “406Day”, the International Search and Rescue Beacon Day by lifting the veil on new life-saving features.

6.4.2022 12:40  
The Galileo SAR reached new heights with a record-breaking location accuracy performance of 98.12% below 2km. The EU constellation is the biggest contributor to the Cospas-Sarsat MEOSAR system.
Published: 
06 April 2022

Beacon Awareness Day (#406Day) is an opportunity to celebrate the amazing work carried out by Search and Rescue teams across the globe that risk their lives daily to save people in distress. It also aims to remind the owners of Search and Rescue beacons of the need to register their beacons and test them regularly.

On #406Day2021, we celebrate Search and Rescue teams all around the world. But why 406? Well, 406 Day, as April 6th is written in the US where the initiative emerged, is a reference to the 406 MHz frequency of the Search and Rescue beacons used by the international rescue organisation Cospas-Sarsat. These beacons help save an average of seven lives every day around the world.

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), the European Commission, and their partners, the European Space Agency (ESA), is proud to celebrate Galileo’s contribution to this international effort.

The Search and Rescue (SAR) transponders installed onboard the Galileo satellites decrease the detection and location time of a distress beacon dramatically, speeding up the rescue response and augmenting the chances of survival. Galileo/SAR is the only system delivering the Return Link Service (RLS). This feature provides the user in distress with an acknowledgment indication on the beacon that the distress signal was received and its position located.

Today, Galileo provides more than 90% of the approved L-band satellite-based search and rescue capabilities with 24/7 worldwide coverage. On top, Galileo is also the largest search and rescue ground segment provider with a committed performance of over 20% of the Earth's surface.

It is a great European achievement, which shows that Europe is not only a major space power but also an actor continuously working on people's well-being. The 406 Day is also the perfect occasion to pay tribute to all the members of the Rescue teams around the world.

As announced last year, and based on the feedback received from more than 250 operational Search and Rescue units, Galileo is designing new features to answer their operational needs as closely as possible, to save even more lives. The Remote Beacon Activation Service (e.g. in the case of the disappearance of a plane or a vessel) and the Two-Way communication functionality (that allows rescue coordinators to send pre-programmed questions and instructions to the person in distress) is due to enter into preliminary testing shortly.

Click here for more info.

See how EU Space mitigates risks and saves lives in the Arctic region. 

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The Galileo SAR reached new heights with a record-breaking location accuracy performance of 98.12% below 2km. The EU constellation is the biggest contributor to the Cospas-Sarsat MEOSAR system.

EUSPA celebrates “406Day”, the International Search and Rescue Beacon Day by lifting the veil on new life-saving features.

6.4.2022 12:40  
The Galileo SAR reached new heights with a record-breaking location accuracy performance of 98.12% below 2km. The EU constellation is the biggest contributor to the Cospas-Sarsat MEOSAR system.
Published: 
06 April 2022

Beacon Awareness Day (#406Day) is an opportunity to celebrate the amazing work carried out by Search and Rescue teams across the globe that risk their lives daily to save people in distress. It also aims to remind the owners of Search and Rescue beacons of the need to register their beacons and test them regularly.

On #406Day2021, we celebrate Search and Rescue teams all around the world. But why 406? Well, 406 Day, as April 6th is written in the US where the initiative emerged, is a reference to the 406 MHz frequency of the Search and Rescue beacons used by the international rescue organisation Cospas-Sarsat. These beacons help save an average of seven lives every day around the world.

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), the European Commission, and their partners, the European Space Agency (ESA), is proud to celebrate Galileo’s contribution to this international effort.

The Search and Rescue (SAR) transponders installed onboard the Galileo satellites decrease the detection and location time of a distress beacon dramatically, speeding up the rescue response and augmenting the chances of survival. Galileo/SAR is the only system delivering the Return Link Service (RLS). This feature provides the user in distress with an acknowledgment indication on the beacon that the distress signal was received and its position located.

Today, Galileo provides more than 90% of the approved L-band satellite-based search and rescue capabilities with 24/7 worldwide coverage. On top, Galileo is also the largest search and rescue ground segment provider with a committed performance of over 20% of the Earth's surface.

It is a great European achievement, which shows that Europe is not only a major space power but also an actor continuously working on people's well-being. The 406 Day is also the perfect occasion to pay tribute to all the members of the Rescue teams around the world.

As announced last year, and based on the feedback received from more than 250 operational Search and Rescue units, Galileo is designing new features to answer their operational needs as closely as possible, to save even more lives. The Remote Beacon Activation Service (e.g. in the case of the disappearance of a plane or a vessel) and the Two-Way communication functionality (that allows rescue coordinators to send pre-programmed questions and instructions to the person in distress) is due to enter into preliminary testing shortly.

Click here for more info.

Watch our first ever short documentary to see how Galileo-enabled Emergency Position-Indicating Radiobeacon (EPIRB) is used to save lives in the Arctic Circle, and what benefits the EU Space Programme brings to better understand and fight the challenges climate change is causing, from affecting communities and ecosystems to disrupting maritime operations in the Arctic Circle. 

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The Galileo SAR reached new heights with a record-breaking location accuracy performance of 98.12% below 2km. The EU constellation is the biggest contributor to the Cospas-Sarsat MEOSAR system.

EUSPA celebrates “406Day”, the International Search and Rescue Beacon Day by lifting the veil on new life-saving features.

6.4.2022 12:40  
The Galileo SAR reached new heights with a record-breaking location accuracy performance of 98.12% below 2km. The EU constellation is the biggest contributor to the Cospas-Sarsat MEOSAR system.
Published: 
06 April 2022

Beacon Awareness Day (#406Day) is an opportunity to celebrate the amazing work carried out by Search and Rescue teams across the globe that risk their lives daily to save people in distress. It also aims to remind the owners of Search and Rescue beacons of the need to register their beacons and test them regularly.

On #406Day2021, we celebrate Search and Rescue teams all around the world. But why 406? Well, 406 Day, as April 6th is written in the US where the initiative emerged, is a reference to the 406 MHz frequency of the Search and Rescue beacons used by the international rescue organisation Cospas-Sarsat. These beacons help save an average of seven lives every day around the world.

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), the European Commission, and their partners, the European Space Agency (ESA), is proud to celebrate Galileo’s contribution to this international effort.

The Search and Rescue (SAR) transponders installed onboard the Galileo satellites decrease the detection and location time of a distress beacon dramatically, speeding up the rescue response and augmenting the chances of survival. Galileo/SAR is the only system delivering the Return Link Service (RLS). This feature provides the user in distress with an acknowledgment indication on the beacon that the distress signal was received and its position located.

Today, Galileo provides more than 90% of the approved L-band satellite-based search and rescue capabilities with 24/7 worldwide coverage. On top, Galileo is also the largest search and rescue ground segment provider with a committed performance of over 20% of the Earth's surface.

It is a great European achievement, which shows that Europe is not only a major space power but also an actor continuously working on people's well-being. The 406 Day is also the perfect occasion to pay tribute to all the members of the Rescue teams around the world.

As announced last year, and based on the feedback received from more than 250 operational Search and Rescue units, Galileo is designing new features to answer their operational needs as closely as possible, to save even more lives. The Remote Beacon Activation Service (e.g. in the case of the disappearance of a plane or a vessel) and the Two-Way communication functionality (that allows rescue coordinators to send pre-programmed questions and instructions to the person in distress) is due to enter into preliminary testing shortly.

Click here for more info.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The Galileo SAR reached new heights with a record-breaking location accuracy performance of 98.12% below 2km. The EU constellation is the biggest contributor to the Cospas-Sarsat MEOSAR system.

EUSPA celebrates “406Day”, the International Search and Rescue Beacon Day by lifting the veil on new life-saving features.

6.4.2022 12:40  
The Galileo SAR reached new heights with a record-breaking location accuracy performance of 98.12% below 2km. The EU constellation is the biggest contributor to the Cospas-Sarsat MEOSAR system.
Published: 
06 April 2022

Beacon Awareness Day (#406Day) is an opportunity to celebrate the amazing work carried out by Search and Rescue teams across the globe that risk their lives daily to save people in distress. It also aims to remind the owners of Search and Rescue beacons of the need to register their beacons and test them regularly.

On #406Day2021, we celebrate Search and Rescue teams all around the world. But why 406? Well, 406 Day, as April 6th is written in the US where the initiative emerged, is a reference to the 406 MHz frequency of the Search and Rescue beacons used by the international rescue organisation Cospas-Sarsat. These beacons help save an average of seven lives every day around the world.

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), the European Commission, and their partners, the European Space Agency (ESA), is proud to celebrate Galileo’s contribution to this international effort.

The Search and Rescue (SAR) transponders installed onboard the Galileo satellites decrease the detection and location time of a distress beacon dramatically, speeding up the rescue response and augmenting the chances of survival. Galileo/SAR is the only system delivering the Return Link Service (RLS). This feature provides the user in distress with an acknowledgment indication on the beacon that the distress signal was received and its position located.

Today, Galileo provides more than 90% of the approved L-band satellite-based search and rescue capabilities with 24/7 worldwide coverage. On top, Galileo is also the largest search and rescue ground segment provider with a committed performance of over 20% of the Earth's surface.

It is a great European achievement, which shows that Europe is not only a major space power but also an actor continuously working on people's well-being. The 406 Day is also the perfect occasion to pay tribute to all the members of the Rescue teams around the world.

As announced last year, and based on the feedback received from more than 250 operational Search and Rescue units, Galileo is designing new features to answer their operational needs as closely as possible, to save even more lives. The Remote Beacon Activation Service (e.g. in the case of the disappearance of a plane or a vessel) and the Two-Way communication functionality (that allows rescue coordinators to send pre-programmed questions and instructions to the person in distress) is due to enter into preliminary testing shortly.

Click here for more info.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The Galileo SAR reached new heights with a record-breaking location accuracy performance of 98.12% below 2km. The EU constellation is the biggest contributor to the Cospas-Sarsat MEOSAR system.

EUSPA celebrates “406Day”, the International Search and Rescue Beacon Day by lifting the veil on new life-saving features.

6.4.2022 12:40  
The Galileo SAR reached new heights with a record-breaking location accuracy performance of 98.12% below 2km. The EU constellation is the biggest contributor to the Cospas-Sarsat MEOSAR system.
Published: 
06 April 2022

Beacon Awareness Day (#406Day) is an opportunity to celebrate the amazing work carried out by Search and Rescue teams across the globe that risk their lives daily to save people in distress. It also aims to remind the owners of Search and Rescue beacons of the need to register their beacons and test them regularly.

On #406Day2021, we celebrate Search and Rescue teams all around the world. But why 406? Well, 406 Day, as April 6th is written in the US where the initiative emerged, is a reference to the 406 MHz frequency of the Search and Rescue beacons used by the international rescue organisation Cospas-Sarsat. These beacons help save an average of seven lives every day around the world.

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), the European Commission, and their partners, the European Space Agency (ESA), is proud to celebrate Galileo’s contribution to this international effort.

The Search and Rescue (SAR) transponders installed onboard the Galileo satellites decrease the detection and location time of a distress beacon dramatically, speeding up the rescue response and augmenting the chances of survival. Galileo/SAR is the only system delivering the Return Link Service (RLS). This feature provides the user in distress with an acknowledgment indication on the beacon that the distress signal was received and its position located.

Today, Galileo provides more than 90% of the approved L-band satellite-based search and rescue capabilities with 24/7 worldwide coverage. On top, Galileo is also the largest search and rescue ground segment provider with a committed performance of over 20% of the Earth's surface.

It is a great European achievement, which shows that Europe is not only a major space power but also an actor continuously working on people's well-being. The 406 Day is also the perfect occasion to pay tribute to all the members of the Rescue teams around the world.

As announced last year, and based on the feedback received from more than 250 operational Search and Rescue units, Galileo is designing new features to answer their operational needs as closely as possible, to save even more lives. The Remote Beacon Activation Service (e.g. in the case of the disappearance of a plane or a vessel) and the Two-Way communication functionality (that allows rescue coordinators to send pre-programmed questions and instructions to the person in distress) is due to enter into preliminary testing shortly.

Click here for more info.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The Galileo SAR reached new heights with a record-breaking location accuracy performance of 98.12% below 2km. The EU constellation is the biggest contributor to the Cospas-Sarsat MEOSAR system.

Space-based solutions set to address some of today’s most pressing challenges

4.4.2022 11:45  
EUSPA launched earlier in 2020 this Horizon Europe call to transform the digital economy, increase the Union’s resilience and support the Green Deal.
Published: 
04 April 2022

Having received 50 proposals, the first Horizon Europe call is set to turn space technologies like Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus into innovative applications and solutions.

The results of the first Horizon Europe call are in, with the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), who manages the call, receiving 50 proposals.

While the proposals come from across Europe, each shares the common goal of developing innovative downstream solutions that leverage data and information from the EU Space Programme, including Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus.

“Linking space to user needs starts with research and innovation,” says EUSPA Head of Market Development Innovation department, Fiammetta Diani. “By facilitating research that leverages the EU Space Programme, Horizon Europe supports the development of space-based solutions to some of today’s most pressing challenges.”

Those challenges are transforming the digital economy, improving safety and security services and mitigating the risk of climate change – and the proposals received for this first call address all three.

For instance, for the Digital Age, EUSPA received 10 innovative applications proposals focusing on this particular topic. Taking advantage of European GNSS’ (EGNSS) superb multipath resistance and authentication, these proposals look to address a range of societal challenges, including health and wellbeing, smart mobility and the sharing economy.

EUSPA also received 12 proposals for using Earth Observation and EGNSS to better protect European citizens from natural disasters and other emergencies. Many of these proposals, highlight the important of timing and synchronisation services offered by Galileo. “In the unfortunate event of wildfires, floods or earthquakes, having ready access to precise location and up-to-date geospatial information are vital to conducting an effective emergency response,” says Diani. “The synergies between Copernicus, Galileo and EGNOS have the potential to offer just that, and these proposals aim to turn that potential into practical solutions.”

As to mitigating the risk of climate change, the first call received 28 proposals for using EGNSS and Earth Observation data to support the objectives of the EU’s Green Deal. “From curbing CO2 emissions to fighting illegal logging, monitoring biodiversity and tracking oil spills, Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus are essential tools for delivering on the Green Deal’s ambitious environmental goals,” adds Diani.

The total indicative budget allocated for these first call proposals is EUR 32.6 million.

The second Horizon Europe call is planned to be opened for submissions in October 2022. With an overall budget of EUR 48.1 million, this second call will focus on supporting the development of innovative space-based downstream applications.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EUSPA launched earlier in 2020 this Horizon Europe call to transform the digital economy, increase the Union’s resilience and support the Green Deal.

Save the date: EUSpace4Ukraine humanitarian help webinar on 12 April

31.3.2022 12:58  
Published: 
31 March 2022

The European Union, its Member States, and Europeans across the continent have joined efforts to support Ukrainians fleeing the devastating war. EUSPA is mobilizing the EU Space innovation community who can provide solutions to enhance humanitarian support for Ukraine people. We are creating a platform to match the innovators with the NGOs and other helpers.

If you are a start-up, an innovator, an NGO or a helper providing humanitarian support for Ukraine, save the date for our webinar on 12 April - 10:00 am - 11:00 am, to discover how you can be part of the platform and the upcoming opportunities!

Register here.

Meanwhile, EUSPA, being a user-oriented agency is currently setting up a first version of the platform grouping applications and solutions that leverage freely accessible data of Galileo and Copernicus to enhance humanitarian support for Ukraine people. In the webinar you will discover how to contribute to growing this first platform.

The applications/solutions will cover a wide range of uses, from supporting NGOs delivering medical goods via drones to practical solutions to support the integration in EU countries of people fleeing the war.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Data from the EU Space Programme are provided freely to users around the globe.

Save the date: EUSpace4Ukraine humanitarian help webinar on 12 April

31.3.2022 12:58  
Data from the EU Space Programme are provided freely to users around the globe.
Published: 
30 March 2022

EUSPA to mobilise the EU Space innovation community and provide solutions to enhance humanitarian support to those fleeing the war.

The European Union, its Member States, and Europeans across the continent have joined efforts to support people fleeing the devastating war. EUSPA is mobilizing the EU Space innovation community who can provide solutions to enhance humanitarian support. We are creating a platform to match the innovators with the NGOs and other helpers.

If you are a start-up, an innovator, an NGO or a helper providing humanitarian support for Ukraine, save the date for our webinar on 12 April - 10:00 am - 11:00 am, to discover how you can be part of the platform and the upcoming opportunities!

Register here.

Meanwhile, EUSPA, being a user-oriented agency is currently setting up a first version of the platform grouping applications and solutions that leverage freely accessible data of Galileo and Copernicus to enhance humanitarian support for Ukraine people. In the webinar you will discover how to contribute to growing this first platform.

The applications/solutions will cover a wide range of uses, from supporting NGOs delivering medical goods via drones to practical solutions to support the integration in EU countries of people fleeing the war.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Data from the EU Space Programme are provided freely to users around the globe.

Save the date: EUSpace4Ukraine humanitarian help webinar on 12 April

31.3.2022 12:58  
Data from the EU Space Programme are provided freely to users around the globe.
Published: 
31 March 2022

EUSPA to mobilise the EU Space innovation community and provide solutions to enhance humanitarian support for the Ukrainian people.

The European Union, its Member States, and Europeans across the continent have joined efforts to support Ukrainians fleeing the devastating war. EUSPA is mobilizing the EU Space innovation community who can provide solutions to enhance humanitarian support for Ukraine people. We are creating a platform to match the innovators with the NGOs and other helpers.

If you are a start-up, an innovator, an NGO or a helper providing humanitarian support for Ukraine, save the date for our webinar on 12 April - 10:00 am - 11:00 am, to discover how you can be part of the platform and the upcoming opportunities!

Register here.

Meanwhile, EUSPA, being a user-oriented agency is currently setting up a first version of the platform grouping applications and solutions that leverage freely accessible data of Galileo and Copernicus to enhance humanitarian support for Ukraine people. In the webinar you will discover how to contribute to growing this first platform.

The applications/solutions will cover a wide range of uses, from supporting NGOs delivering medical goods via drones to practical solutions to support the integration in EU countries of people fleeing the war.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Data from the EU Space Programme are provided freely to users around the globe.

Save the date: EUSpace4Ukraine humanitarian help webinar on 12 April

31.3.2022 12:58  
Data from the EU Space Programme are provided freely to users around the globe.
Published: 
31 March 2022

EUSPA to mobilise the EU Space innovation community and provide solutions to enhance humanitarian support for the Ukrainian people.

The European Union, its Member States, and Europeans across the continent have joined efforts to support Ukrainians fleeing the devastating war. EUSPA is mobilizing the EU Space innovation community who can provide solutions to enhance humanitarian support for Ukraine people. We are creating a platform to match the innovators with the NGOs and other helpers.

If you are a start-up, an innovator, an NGO or a helper providing humanitarian support for Ukraine, save the date for our webinar on 12 April - 10:00 am - 11:00 am, to discover how you can be part of the platform and the upcoming opportunities!

Register here.

Meanwhile, EUSPA, being a user-oriented agency is currently setting up a first version of the platform grouping applications and solutions that leverage freely accessible data of Galileo and Copernicus to enhance humanitarian support for Ukraine people. In the webinar you will discover how to contribute to growing this first platform.

The applications/solutions will cover a wide range of uses, from supporting NGOs delivering medical goods via drones to practical solutions to support the integration in EU countries of people fleeing the war.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Data from the EU Space Programme are provided freely to users around the globe.

Save the date: EUSpace4Ukraine humanitarian help webinar on 12 April

31.3.2022 12:58  
Data from the EU Space Programme are provided freely to users around the globe.
Published: 
31 March 2022

EUSPA to mobilise the EU Space innovation community and provide solutions to enhance humanitarian support for the Ukrainian people.

The European Union, its Member States, and Europeans across the continent have joined efforts to support Ukrainians fleeing the devastating war. EUSPA is mobilizing the EU Space innovation community who can provide solutions to enhance humanitarian support for Ukrainian people. We are creating a platform to match the innovators with the NGOs and other helpers.

If you are a start-up, an innovator, an NGO or a helper providing humanitarian support for Ukraine, save the date for our webinar on 12 April - 10:00 am - 11:00 am, to discover how you can be part of the platform and the upcoming opportunities!

Register here.

Meanwhile, EUSPA, being a user-oriented agency is currently setting up a first version of the platform grouping applications and solutions that leverage freely accessible data of Galileo and Copernicus to enhance humanitarian support for Ukraine people. In the webinar you will discover how to contribute to growing this first platform.

The applications/solutions will cover a wide range of uses, from supporting NGOs delivering medical goods via drones to practical solutions to support the integration in EU countries of people fleeing the war.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Data from the EU Space Programme are provided freely to users around the globe.

Save the date: EUSpace4Ukraine humanitarian help webinar on 12 April

31.3.2022 12:58  
Data from the EU Space Programme are provided freely to users around the globe.
Published: 
31 March 2022

EUSPA to mobilise the EU Space innovation community and provide solutions to enhance humanitarian support to those fleeing the war.

The European Union, its Member States, and Europeans across the continent have joined efforts to support people fleeing the devastating war. EUSPA is mobilizing the EU Space innovation community who can provide solutions to enhance humanitarian support. We are creating a platform to match the innovators with the NGOs and other helpers.

If you are a start-up, an innovator, an NGO or a helper providing humanitarian support for Ukraine, save the date for our webinar on 12 April - 10:00 am - 11:00 am, to discover how you can be part of the platform and the upcoming opportunities!

Register here.

Meanwhile, EUSPA, being a user-oriented agency is currently setting up a first version of the platform grouping applications and solutions that leverage freely accessible data of Galileo and Copernicus to enhance humanitarian support for Ukraine people. In the webinar you will discover how to contribute to growing this first platform.

The applications/solutions will cover a wide range of uses, from supporting NGOs delivering medical goods via drones to practical solutions to support the integration in EU countries of people fleeing the war.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Data from the EU Space Programme are provided freely to users around the globe.

Save the date: EUSpace4Ukraine humanitarian help webinar on 12 April

31.3.2022 12:58  
Data from the EU Space Programme are provided freely to users around the globe.

The European Union, its Member States, and Europeans across the continent have joined efforts to support Ukrainians fleeing the devastating war. EUSPA is mobilizing the EU Space innovation community who can provide solutions to enhance humanitarian support for Ukraine people. We are creating a platform to match the innovators with the NGOs and other helpers.

If you are a start-up, an innovator, an NGO or a helper providing humanitarian support for Ukraine, save the date for our webinar on 12 April - 10:00 am - 11:00 am, to discover how you can be part of the platform and the upcoming opportunities!

Register here.

Meanwhile, EUSPA, being a user-oriented agency is currently setting up a first version of the platform grouping applications and solutions that leverage freely accessible data of Galileo and Copernicus to enhance humanitarian support for Ukraine people. In the webinar you will discover how to contribute to growing this first platform.

The applications/solutions will cover a wide range of uses, from supporting NGOs delivering medical goods via drones to practical solutions to support the integration in EU countries of people fleeing the war.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Data from the EU Space Programme are provided freely to users around the globe.

Deadline for Galileo Reference Centre procurement approaching

23.3.2022 12:02  
The deadline for the procurement on “GRC Infrastructure evolution, nominal operations support, and maintenance’’ is on April 11 23:59 CET.
Published: 
23 March 2022

Located in Noordwijk, the Netherlands, the Galileo Reference Centre (GRC) is a cornerstone of the Galileo service provision. From Initial Services to full operational capability and beyond, it provides EUSPA with an independent service facility to evaluate the quality of the signals in space and the overall performance of the different Galileo services. In doing so, it helps the EUSPA ensure the delivery of world-class navigation services so users can better rely on and benefit from Galileo. EUSPA is responsible for the management of the GRC, including its development and operations. The GRC helps ensure that Galileo users are provided with very high-quality signals for use by an array of the new navigation applications, but it also monitors, where feasible, other GNSSs.

Read this: The Galileo Reference Centre evolves to support the constellation’s growing needs (europa.eu)

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) published a procurement on the “GRC Nominal Operations Support, Infrastructure Development, Evolution, and Maintenance”. To encourage large participation, EUSPA held a workshop to present the details of the call on 10 March 2022. Presentations delivered during this workshop are available here.

Q&A followed the presentation during this successful workshop. The questions and our answers can be found here.

With this procurement, EUSPA is looking for partners to provide services and supplies to support the agency in shaping the future versions of the GRC infrastructure to support the evolutions of several GNSS services.

Application deadline is on April 11 2022 at 23:59 CET.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The deadline for the procurement on “GRC Infrastructure evolution, nominal operations support, and maintenance’’ is on April 11 23:59 CET.

The world has a water problem, and space may have a solution

22.3.2022 13:50  
Both Copernicus, for EO, and Galileo, for GNSS, are also being used to support Europe’s growing aquaculture sector.
Published: 
22 March 2022

The world has a water problem. At present, according to the World Health Organisation (WHO) there are 785 million people who lack access to clean water – that’s one in every 10 people on the planet. But the problem goes well beyond the water we drink; it also affects the food we eat. For example, water scarcity, due in part to the increase in droughts caused by climate change, means farmers have less water to grow their crops with.

In parallel, people are increasingly looking to our oceans, lakes and rivers for food – a shift that causes another problem: overfishing. According to some estimates, nearly 30% of all commercially fished species are now considered to be overfished. In the Mediterranean and Black seas, that number is closer to 88%.

With climate change set to exacerbate the water crisis, there’s an urgent need for new solutions.

Two of those solutions are Earth Observation (EO) and Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS).

Go fish

According to the latest edition of the EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report, Earth Observation is already being used to assess the location of fish stocks, while GNSS is used to track the location of vessels in an effort to prevent illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing – an important component of the EU’s Common Fisheries Policy (CFP). 

Both Copernicus, for EO, and Galileo, for GNSS, are also being used to support Europe’s growing aquaculture sector. For instance, by providing information and data on environmental conditions and long-term weather forecasts, EO-based applications play a key role in selecting ideal locations to establish aquafarms. Once the aquafarm is up and running, Copernicus, together with Galileo, is used to optimise operations and provide aquafarmers with a wide range of insight and information.

Keeping an eye on our oceans’ health

While sustainable fisheries and aquaculture are important to securing food production, and are key components to the European Union’s Green Deal, they both depend on having healthy oceans. Here too, GNSS and especially EO play an important role.

Oceans, which account for about 71% of the Earth’s surface, are at the centre of climate change. That’s because oceans act as a natural carbon sink, essentially absorbing much of the carbon being emitted into the atmosphere. As the oceans absorb more carbon, their temperatures go up, which can lead to a whole host of problems, including rising sea levels, changes in fish migration, the killing of coral reefs and alterations to the world’s climate patterns.

To mitigate these issues, the Copernicus Marine and Climate Change Services monitor a number of key climate indicators, such as sea level, temperature, currents and salinity. This data can then be used to drive global climate policy decisions.

 Phytoplankton are microscopic plants that grow in the sunlit surface waters of the ocean. When their concentration reaches a certain level, the bloom becomes visible from space.

Phytoplankton are microscopic plants that grow in the sunlit surface waters of the ocean. When their concentration reaches a certain level, the bloom becomes visible from space.

For freshwater too

EO’s usefulness doesn’t stop with salt water, it’s being used to monitor the quality of freshwater sources too. Today, scientists and policymakers regularly use data coming from Copernicus satellites to, for example, measure water surface temperature, which can tell us a lot about a lake or river’s overall health.

This same data can be used to track how rising global temperatures and more extreme weather events increase a body of water’s acidity, cause a build-up of pathogens, and change its nutrient concentration. And because quality freshwater is essential to drinking water, this same data can play a key role in achieving the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal of ensuring access to water and sanitation for all

So on this World Water Day, as you’re enjoying a fresh glass of H2O, be sure to look up and remember how space-based solutions are working to ensure the healthy climate, healthy oceans, and healthy freshwater systems that make our water sustainable, safe and sanitary.

--

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (https://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Both Copernicus, for EO, and Galileo, for GNSS, are also being used to support Europe’s growing aquaculture sector.

The world has a water problem, and space may have a solution

22.3.2022 13:50  
Both Copernicus, for EO, and Galileo, for GNSS, are also being used to support Europe’s growing aquaculture sector.
Published: 
22 March 2022

The world has a water problem. At present, according to the World Health Organisation (WHO) there are 785 million people who lack access to clean water – that’s one in every 10 people on the planet. But the problem goes well beyond the water we drink; it also affects the food we eat. For example, water scarcity, due in part to the increase in droughts caused by climate change, means farmers have less water to grow their crops with.

In parallel, people are increasingly looking to our oceans, lakes and rivers for food – a shift that causes another problem: overfishing. According to some estimates, nearly 30% of all commercially fished species are now considered to be overfished. In the Mediterranean and Black seas, that number is closer to 88%.

With climate change set to exacerbate the water crisis, there’s an urgent need for new solutions.

Two of those solutions are Earth Observation (EO) and Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS).

Go fish

According to the latest edition of the EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report, Earth Observation is already being used to assess the location of fish stocks and to track the location of vessels in an effort to prevent illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing – an important component of the EU’s Common Fisheries Policy (CFP). 

Both Copernicus, for EO, and Galileo, for GNSS, are also being used to support Europe’s growing aquaculture sector. For instance, by providing information and data on environmental conditions and long-term weather forecasts, EO-based applications play a key role in selecting ideal locations to establish aquafarms. Once the aquafarm is up and running, Copernicus, together with Galileo, is used to optimise operations and provide aquafarmers with a wide range of insight and information.

Keeping an eye on our oceans’ health

While sustainable fisheries and aquaculture are important to securing food production, and are key components to the European Union’s Green Deal, they both depend on having healthy oceans. Here too, GNSS and especially EO play an important role.

Oceans, which account for about 71% of the Earth’s surface, are at the centre of climate change. That’s because oceans act as a natural carbon sink, essentially absorbing much of the carbon being emitted into the atmosphere. As the oceans absorb more carbon, their temperatures go up, which can lead to a whole host of problems, including rising sea levels, changes in fish migration, the killing of coral reefs and alterations to the world’s climate patterns.

To mitigate these issues, the Copernicus Marine and Climate Change Services monitor a number of key climate indicators, such as sea level, temperature, currents and salinity. This data can then be used to drive global climate policy decisions.

 Phytoplankton are microscopic plants that grow in the sunlit surface waters of the ocean. When their concentration reaches a certain level, the bloom becomes visible from space.

Phytoplankton are microscopic plants that grow in the sunlit surface waters of the ocean. When their concentration reaches a certain level, the bloom becomes visible from space.

For freshwater too

EO’s usefulness doesn’t stop with salt water, it’s being used to monitor the quality of freshwater sources too. Today, scientists and policymakers regularly use data coming from Copernicus satellites to, for example, measure water surface temperature, which can tell us a lot about a lake or river’s overall health.

This same data can be used to track how rising global temperatures and more extreme weather events increase a body of water’s acidity, cause a build-up of pathogens, and change its nutrient concentration. And because quality freshwater is essential to drinking water, this same data can play a key role in achieving the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal of ensuring access to water and sanitation for all

So on this World Water Day, as you’re enjoying a fresh glass of H2O, be sure to look up and remember how space-based solutions are working to ensure the healthy climate, healthy oceans, and healthy freshwater systems that make our water sustainable, safe and sanitary.

--

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (https://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Both Copernicus, for EO, and Galileo, for GNSS, are also being used to support Europe’s growing aquaculture sector.

The best time to invest in space – EUSPA launches info session for fund managers

18.3.2022 16:21  
The event will be held live at EUSPA’s headquarters in Prague, as well as online. Attendance is free, but registration is required.
Published: 
18 March 2022

The best time to invest in space – EUSPA launches info session for fund managers.

According to the latest edition of the EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report, in 2021, the GNSS and Earth Observation downstream market generated over EUR 200 billion in revenue.

What’s more, this market is expected to reach nearly half a trillion euros within the next decade. Add this up and what you have is a very lucrative investment opportunity.

But to take advantage of this opportunity, you need the right information and the right market intelligence – which is exactly what the Space Investments Capacity Building Programme is set to provide.

Organised by the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), in collaboration with the European Commission, European Space Agency (ESA) and European Investment Fund (EIF), this series of five workshops is designed to provide venture capitalists, fund managers and other investors with in-depth information on the space sector, including:

  • Results from the latest European space market and investment studies
  • Advice from the EIF on fund setup, investment strategy and building an investment team
  • A platform to discuss business models and best practices
  • Opportunities to network with other fund managers
  • Details on the European Commission’s EUR 1 billion CASSINI Facility, an InvestEU initiative offering capital for establishing space-focused investment funds

The first workshop, scheduled for 28 March 2022 from 14:00 – 17:00 CET, will focus on how EU space technology – including Galileo and Copernicus – can be used to support the construction sector, optimise the green transformation and maintain critical infrastructure.

If you want to become an active investor in this exciting field or simply want to gather more information before deciding to raise a new fund, then this capacity building programme is for you”, says Fiammetta Diani, EUSPA Head of Market Downstream and Innovation.

The event will be held live at EUSPA’s headquarters in Prague, as well as online. Attendance is free, but registration is required. For participants able to attend physically in Prague, please send an email to market@euspa.europa.eu to secure your place in the venue. Questions related to the workshop series or requests for additional information can be directed to this email address as well.

Mark Your Calendars: Space Investments Capacity Building Programme 2022

  • Episode 1: Infrastructure lifecycle support from space, EUSPA, Prague, Monday 28 March 2022
  • Episode 2: Security and defence (in and from space), COM, Brussels, Monday 2 May 2022
  • Episode 3: Consumer space solutions: well-being, education and entertainment, EUSPA, Prague, Monday 23 May 2022
  • Episode 4: Access to space (launchers, ground systems, modular technology, etc), ESA, Paris, Tuesday 7 June 2022
  • Episode 5: Fund setup, investment strategy, investment team, exit strategy, EIF, Luxemburg, Monday 27 June 2022

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The event will be held live at EUSPA’s headquarters in Prague, as well as online. Attendance is free, but registration is required.

The best time to invest in space – EUSPA launches info session for fund managers

18.3.2022 16:21  
The event will be held live at EUSPA’s headquarters in Prague, as well as online. Attendance is free, but registration is required.
Published: 
18 March 2022

The best time to invest in space – EUSPA launches info session for fund managers.

According to the latest edition of the EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report, in 2021, the GNSS and Earth Observation downstream market generated over EUR 200 billion in revenue.

What’s more, this market is expected to reach nearly half a trillion euros within the next decade. Add this up and what you have is a very lucrative investment opportunity.

But to take advantage of this opportunity, you need the right information and the right market intelligence – which is exactly what the Space Investments Capacity Building Programme is set to provide.

Organised by the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), in collaboration with the European Commission, European Space Agency (ESA) and European Investment Fund (EIF), this series of five workshops is designed to provide venture capitalists, fund managers and other investors with in-depth information on the space sector, including:

  • Results from the latest European space market and investment studies
  • Advice from the EIF on fund setup, investment strategy and building an investment team
  • A platform to discuss business models and best practices
  • Opportunities to network with other fund managers
  • Details on the European Commission’s EUR 1 billion CASSINI Facility, an InvestEU initiative offering capital for establishing space-focused investment funds

The first workshop, scheduled for 28 March 2022 from 14:00 – 17:00 CET, will focus on how EU space technology – including Galileo and Copernicus – can be used to support the construction sector, optimise the green transformation and maintain critical infrastructure.

If you want to become an active investor in this exciting field or simply want to gather more information before deciding to raise a new fund, then this capacity building programme is for you”, says Fiammetta Diani, EUSPA Head of Market Downstream and Innovation.

The event will be held live at EUSPA’s headquarters in Prague, as well as online. Attendance is free, but registration is required. For participants able to attend physically in Prague, please send an email to market@euspa.europa.eu to secure your place in the venue. Questions related to the workshop series or requests for additional information can be directed to this email address as well.

Mark Your Calendars: Space Investments Capacity Building Programme 2022

  • Episode 1: Infrastructure lifecycle support from space, EUSPA, Prague, Monday 28 March 2022
  • Episode 2: Security and defence (in and from space), COM, Brussels, Monday 2 May 2022
  • Episode 3: Consumer space solutions: well-being, education and entertainment, EUSPA, Prague, Monday 23 May 2022
  • Episode 4: Access to space (launchers, ground systems, modular technology, etc), ESA, Paris, Tuesday 7 June 2022
  • Episode 5: Fund setup, investment strategy, investment team, exit strategy, EIF, Luxemburg, Monday 27 June 2022

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The event will be held live at EUSPA’s headquarters in Prague, as well as online. Attendance is free, but registration is required.

BroadGNSS Request for Tender now open, deadline is 2 May 2022

18.3.2022 11:57  
BroadGNSS is a Pre-Commercial Procurement (PCP) project which will procure Innovation activity for Applications, Synchronisation and Monitoring of Critical Mobile Broadband Communication Infrastructure and Information Assets for Public Protection and Disaster Recovery (PPDR) Operations.
Published: 
18 March 2022

BroadGNSS, the Pre-Commercial Procurement action funded by the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), moves into the Request for Tender phase.

Launched in December 2020, the EUSPA-funded BroadGNSS  project dedicates EUR 2.1 million for the pre-commercial procurement (PCP) of innovative solutions that use European GNSS (EGNSS) to improve public safety and disaster relief services.

BroadGNSS now moves into the Request for Tender (RFT) phase.

Download: BroadGNSS RFT documents (available in English and French)

With the 2 May 2022 deadline fast approaching for the submission of tenders, the project recently held informational briefings. The events focused on preparing and submitting the tender, along with providing an overview of how received tenders will be evaluated.

The project puts also at your disposal the BroadGNSS Partnering Tool. This tool is a convenient way for companies to share information on both the expertise they offer and the expertise they require to build up consortia.

The Group of Procurers will then evaluate the tenders submitted and a maximum of 10 (and a minimum of four) suppliers/supply teams will be selected.

The Contract Notice can be viewed in full on TED.

To submit your tender: https://www.marches-publics.gouv.fr/app.php/entreprise/consultation/1973325?orgAcronyme=g6l.

More details on the PCP process can be found here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

BroadGNSS will procure Innovation activity for Applications, Synchronisation & Monitoring of Critical Mobile Broadband Communication Infrastructure & Information Assets for Public Protection & Disaster Recovery Operations

BroadGNSS Request for Tender now open, deadline is 2 May 2022

18.3.2022 11:57  
BroadGNSS is a Pre-Commercial Procurement (PCP) project which will procure Innovation activity for Applications, Synchronisation and Monitoring of Critical Mobile Broadband Communication Infrastructure and Information Assets for Public Protection and Disaster Recovery (PPDR) Operations.
Published: 
18 March 2022

BroadGNSS, the Pre-Commercial Procurement action funded by the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), moves into the Request for Tender phase.

Launched in December 2020, the EUSPA-funded BroadGNSS  project has dedicated EUR 2.5 million for the pre-commercial procurement (PCP) of innovative solutions that use European GNSS (EGNSS) to improve public safety and disaster relief services.

As the Contract Notice has been published in the Official Journal of the European Union (OJEU), BroadGNSS now moves into the Request for Tender (RFT) phase.

Download: BroadGNSS RFT documents (available in English and French)

With the 2 May 2022 deadline fast approaching, the project recently held informational briefings. The events focused on preparing and submitting the tender, along with providing an overview of how received tenders will be evaluated.

Anyone considering submitting a tender should be sure to add their company name to the BroadGNSS Partnering Tool. This tool is a convenient way for potential consortium members to share information on both the expertise they offer and the expertise they require.

Once registered, you can start browsing other listed companies. When you see a company that you want to contact, simply send a message via the Contact Page specifying the name of the company you want to contact. You will receive the requested information within two business days.

A maximum of 10 (and a minimum of four) suppliers/supply teams will be selected based on the evaluation of the tenders to be submitted by the 2nd of May 2022, with a joint framework agreement and contract for the Design Phase to follow.

The Contract Notice can be viewed in full on TED.

More details on the PCP process can be found here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

BroadGNSS is a Pre-Commercial Procurement (PCP) project which will procure Innovation activity for Applications, Synchronisation and Monitoring of Critical Mobile Broadband Communication Infrastructure and Information Assets for Public Protection and Disa

BroadGNSS Request for Tender now open, deadline is 2 May 2022

18.3.2022 11:57  
BroadGNSS is a Pre-Commercial Procurement (PCP) project which will procure Innovation activity for Applications, Synchronisation and Monitoring of Critical Mobile Broadband Communication Infrastructure and Information Assets for Public Protection and Disaster Recovery (PPDR) Operations.
Published: 
18 March 2022

BroadGNSS, the Pre-Commercial Procurement action funded by the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), moves into the Request for Tender phase.

Launched in December 2020, the EUSPA-funded BroadGNSS  project has dedicated EUR 2.5 million for the pre-commercial procurement (PCP) of innovative solutions that use European GNSS (EGNSS) to improve public safety and disaster relief services.

As the Contract Notice has been published in the Official Journal of the European Union (OJEU), BroadGNSS now moves into the Request for Tender (RFT) phase.

Download: BroadGNSS RFT documents (available in English and French)

With the 2 May 2022 deadline fast approaching, the project recently held informational briefings. The events focused on preparing and submitting the tender, along with providing an overview of how received tenders will be evaluated.

Anyone considering submitting a tender should be sure to add their company name to the BroadGNSS Partnering Tool. This tool is a convenient way for potential consortium members to share information on both the expertise they offer and the expertise they require.

Once registered, you can start browsing other listed companies. When you see a company that you want to contact, simply send a message via the Contact Page specifying the name of the company you want to contact. You will receive the requested information within two business days.

A maximum of 10 (and a minimum of four) suppliers/supply teams will be selected based on the evaluation of the tenders to be submitted by the 2nd of May 2022, with a joint framework agreement and contract for the Design Phase to follow.

The Contract Notice can be viewed in full on TED.

More details on the PCP process can be found here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

BroadGNSS will procure Innovation activity for Applications, Synchronisation & Monitoring of Critical Mobile Broadband Communication Infrastructure & Information Assets for Public Protection & Disaster Recovery Operations

Investing in GNSS is key to European competitiveness

17.3.2022 17:03  
The report sets out recommendations to support the EU’s future competitiveness in the GNSS downstream market. These recommendations include the need to mobilise significant investment envelopes through tailored instruments, supported by technical capacity building activities towards fund managers
Published: 
17 March 2022

Through investment opportunities, market intelligence and business support, EUSPA plays an important role in ensuring Europe keeps its competitive position in the fast-growing, global GNSS downstream market. 

With an approximate 25% market share, Europe currently enjoys a strong position within the global GNSS downstream market – a market that is forecasted to see revenues reach EUR 220 billion this year and up to EUR 510 billion by 2032. 

The GNSS downstream market includes any application, device or service where GNSS based positioning, navigation and/or timing is a significant enabler or key to the application’s functionality. While the location based services (LBS) and road segments dominate in terms of total revenues earned, European GNSS (EGNSS) also plays a major role in the aviation, rail, maritime, agriculture, mapping and surveying and timing and synchronisation market segments.  

Europe performs particularly well in the road, maritime and agricultural sectors. In fact, several European companies are global leaders in the manufacturing of GNSS components and receivers for road and maritime applications and the development of the system integrators used by the agricultural industry. 

However, European companies tend to lag in such fast-growing sectors as consumer solutions and drones. According to the recently published GNSS Investment Report, this, combined with increased, across-the-board competition from the downstream GNSS market, could chip away at Europe’s market share and future competitiveness.    

 “It is more important than ever that Europe keep on top of GNSS market trends by seeking more funds, developing strategic oversight and promoting risk-taking,” said Rodrigo da Costa, Executive Director of the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA). 

Da Costa made his remarks during the GNSS Investment Day event, which was co-organised by EUSPA and the European Investment Bank (EIB). The two organisations also co-authored the GNSS Investment Report, which was officially launched at the event. 

The report, the first of its kind, quantifies the investment needs of major companies and looks at the impact the acquisition of EU companies by foreign investors has on Europe’s overall competitiveness. The study also examines the full innovation ecosystem, exploring the funding and support gaps that EU GNSS start-ups and companies face.  

According to da Costa, EUSPA is leading the way in filling some of these gaps. For instance, in addition to providing numerous funding opportunities – including Horizon Calls and innovation competitions – EUSPA is constantly helping European companies best leverage EGNSS data, information and services.  

EUSPA is also a leading source of critical market intelligence. For example, the EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report offers in-depth analyses of the latest global trends and developments through illustrated examples and use cases. Discover other EUSPA reports and publications.

“As the go-to-source for all things EGNSS, EUSPA is well positioned to be the single point of information, expertise and market intelligence that companies from across Europe can depend on when integrating European space solutions into their business solutions,” said da Costa. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The report sets out recommendations to support the EU’s future competitiveness in the GNSS downstream market.

CASSINI Hackathon VOL 3: (Re)Visit Europe with help from the EU Space Programme

15.3.2022 13:18  
The #myEUSpace competition is part of the of the European Commission’s CASSINI initiative to support entrepreneurship in space-related businesses across the EU
Published: 
15 March 2022

The CASSINI Hackathons and Mentoring, initiated by the European Union is a series of six hackathons aimed to tackle global challenges using services and data from the EU Space Programme. In its third edition, this hackathon provides access to European space data and services from Copernicus, Galileo, and EGNOS to help participants take on various challenges and uplift Europe’s tourism industry. 

Europe’s tourism industry is bursting with potential. In the last four years alone, the continent has welcomed over 2 billion global tourists, providing a primary source of income for European economies. 

From the medieval streets of Prague and the beaches of Barcelona to the modern skyline of Oslo, Europe truly holds something for everyone. Because of this, the 3rd CASSINI Hackathon will focus on preserving these unforgettable destinations and how we access them. You will be challenged to develop ideas that support sustainable travel, enhance the experience in local cities and cultures, and promote thoughtful exploration of Europe’s nature.

The top ideas will be awarded at both local and EU levels, and the overall winners will enter a six-month mentoring programme that includes 100 hours of customised expert mentoring.

What’s the plat du jour? 

If you are a rising innovator in Europe, you are invited to participate in the CASSINI Hackathon at one of our ten locations. Each hackathon location features its own unique set of experts, prizes, and additional special features. Once you select a location, it’s time for registration, team formation and ideation! 

Your team will choose to solve one of three challenges, all related to the theme of European tourism:

  1. Creating sustainable destinations: Develop innovative ideas, design new products or services that reduce the carbon footprint of tourism travel. For this challenge, participants are encouraged to explore the areas of carbon footprint measurement, alternative destinations or modes of transport, online travel agents and other intermediaries, disruptive travel concepts, and understanding travel patterns between cities or countries.
  2. Experiencing lesser-known cities and cultures: Develop innovative ideas or design new products or services to offer travellers a unique and sustainable way to experience local destinations while supporting local businesses and communities. For this challenge, participants are encouraged to explore the areas of crowd management and slow tourism, personal recommendations and itineraries, social recognition and social media, state-of-the-art virtual travel experiences, and supporting local businesses and communities.
  3. Exploring nature with care: Develop innovative ideas or design new products or services to offer tourists a unique and sustainable opportunity to explore our nature. For this challenge, participants are encouraged to explore the areas of conservation of local nature and biodiversity, social recognition, and social media, supporting local businesses and communities, the generation of (new) routes and points of interest, and tourist information about the environmental state of areas.

Remember, no previous space experience is required! This is your chance to engage with the EUSpace sectors even if it’s for the first time. The application process couldn’t be easier: Simply choose a challenge and decide how you’ll leverage EU space technologies to reshape European tourism. Register here: hackathons.cassini.eu 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The #myEUSpace competition is part of the of the European Commission’s CASSINI initiative to support entrepreneurship in space-related businesses across the EU

43 innovative space-based solutions shortlisted in the #myEUspace competition

11.3.2022 13:03  
With a prize pool of € 1 million and over 50 awards up for grabs, #myEUspace competition - part of the European Commission Cassini initiative will help innovators develop and market  disruptive, space-based commercial solutions to respond to emerging societal needs!
Published: 
28 March 2022

With over EUR 1 million in prize money on the line, #myEUspace is one of the biggest competitions ever organised by EUSPA

The #myEUspace competition supports the development of innovative commercial applications that leverage data coming from the EU Space Programme. To get there, it’s put over EUR 1 million in prize money on the table, and the best of the opportunities to create successful start-ups on the European market.

Targets and tracks 

Applicants could choose to compete in one of two tracks, depending on the maturity of their solution. Track 1 focused on taking an idea to prototype or beta version, whilst Track 2 was for advancing prototypes/beta versions towards commercial readiness. The #myEUspace competition called for ideas on a number of thematic topics to support innovation on Europe. The 6 targeted areas of innovation included:   

smart mobility solutions 

consumer solutions for health, gaming, sports, leisure, tourism and everyday life.

solutions addressing environmental challenges, 

surveying solutions to shape the future of geomatics 

solutions that manage the variability of agricultural production  

and finally, innovative solutions applying quantum technologies 

Now, after receiving more than 200 applications the results are finally in. 43 projects have been selected for their potential to bring disruptive, space-based solutions onto the European market. 

The shortlisted teams are working on a range of novel solutions, new technologies, mobile apps and hardware. While the solutions cover such diverse sectors as location-based services, smart mobility, geomatics and smart agriculture, they all share a foundation in their use of Galileo or Copernicus data as well as their synergies between the two space programme components.

“Space data is at the heart of the technological revolution currently sweeping Europe, and this competition is another example of how EUSPA supports innovative entrepreneurs, start-ups and SMEs from across the EU who are leveraging Copernicus and Galileo data, information and services,” says Rodrigo da Costa, Executive Director, European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA). 

Click here to see the 43 semi-finalists

On to the development phase 

The 23 teams selected from Track 1 each received EUR 10,000, while the 20 Track 2 teams were awarded EUR 15,000. All teams will use the funding to continue developing their prototype or product. The 43 projects now advance into the development phase of the competition, where they will fine-tune their prototypes and products and refine their business plans. This intense nine-week phase culminates at the #myEUspace contest finals on 1 June.

During the finals, each team will have the opportunity to pitch and demonstrate their solution to invited guests. The winners of each innovation area will win an additional prize of EUR 25,000 and EUR 50,000 in Track 1 and Track 2 respectively.

#myEUspace is organised by EUSPA as part of the European Commission’s CASSINI - Space Entrepreneurship Initiative.   

Good luck to all the #myEUspace finalists!

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

With a prize pool of € 1 million and over 50 awards up for grabs, #myEUspace competition - part of the European Commission Cassini initiative will help innovators develop and market disruptive, space-based commercial solutions to respond to emerging soci

European space technology key to achieving a more sustainable future

9.3.2022 16:02  
In addition to joint studies, EUSPA and UNOOSA will coordinate to conduct pilot projects, facilitate knowledge sharing and education on the EU Space Programme, and foster a space economy that best supports the UN SDGs.
Published: 
09 March 2022

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) and the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOSSA) team up to leverage space technology.

Most are familiar with the United Nations (UN) Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the collection of 17 goals designed to serve as a blueprint for achieving a better, more sustainable future for everyone. But did you know that achieving these goals depends in part on the use of European space technologies?

That’s the conclusion reached by a joint report authored by the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) and the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA). “Galileo and EGNOS determine a precise position anytime, anywhere and Copernicus provides information on the Earth’s surface, atmosphere and oceans,” says EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. “However, the joint use of these programmes unleashes an array of synergies that can have a substantial impact.”

“Together, Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus deliver key information supporting the selection of the best location for infrastructures, implement the most fuel-efficient flight paths, monitor CO2 emissions, design efficient and autonomous transportation networks and increase agricultural yields to sustainably feed a growing population, to name just a few examples,” adds UNOOSA Director Simonetta Di Pippo. 

In other words, when it comes to determining how to best meet the UN SDGs, the answer can often be found in space. 

International collaboration on global goals 

Recognising the essential role that Earth Observation and European navigation and positioning services play in supporting sustainable development, and with the goal of leveraging their many benefits, EUSPA and UNOOSA have signed a new Memorandum of Understanding (MoU).

“I sign this MoU with great pride and excitement as UNOOSA is expanding its long-term cooperation with one of the leading space entities. The space sector in the European Union is strong and I look forward to working with EUSPA in extending our support to all Member States of our organisations. Space assets are transformative tools for achieving sustainable socio-economic development and together we aspire to tap into their full potential to ensure their benefits reach everyone, everywhere.” 

EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa, emphasized: “The collaboration between EUSPA and UNOOSA is further reinforced with this MoU, and fully aligned with our agency's commitment to contribute to the delivery of the EU priorities such as the EU Green Deal. Space data and services are more crucial than ever, and we will explore how synergies between satellite navigation systems such as Galileo, Earth observation technology such as Copernicus and satellite communication can help us address pressing societal challenges such as climate change and foster space economy.”

The MoU, which was signed on 9 March 2022, builds on the achievements of a prior MoU that the two organisations signed in 2016. Within the new MoU are provisions for conducting joint studies on the integration of not only EGNSS and Earth Observation, but also Satellite Communications and Space Situational Awareness (SSA). 

These studies will look at how the entire EU Space Programme can be used to manage natural resources and the environment, reduce the risks of disasters, develop new infrastructure and prepare the world for a growing population. 

As to the latter, EUSPA and UNOOSA are already working on a joint publication about the impact that a global population of 8 billion people will likely have on the environment, climate change, resource scarcity and urbanisation. The report, which is expected to be released later this year, will also address the role that space data and technology can play in mitigating such risks. 

In addition to the joint studies, EUSPA and UNOOSA will also coordinate to conduct pilot projects, facilitate knowledge sharing and education on the EU Space Programme, and foster a space economy that best supports the UN SDGs.  

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

In addition to joint studies, EUSPA and UNOOSA will coordinate to conduct pilot projects, facilitate knowledge sharing and education on the EU Space Programme, and foster a space economy that best supports the UN SDGs.

European space technology key to achieving a more sustainable future

9.3.2022 16:02  
In addition to joint studies, EUSPA and UNOOSA will coordinate to conduct pilot projects, facilitate knowledge sharing and education on the EU Space Programme, and foster a space economy that best supports the UN SDGs.
Published: 
09 March 2022

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) and the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOSSA) team up to leverage space technology.

Most are familiar with the United Nations (UN) Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the collection of 17 goals designed to serve as a blueprint for achieving a better, more sustainable future for everyone. But did you know that achieving these goals depends in part on the use of European space technologies?

That’s the conclusion reached by a joint report authored by the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) and the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA). “Galileo and EGNOS determine a precise position anytime, anywhere and Copernicus provides information on the Earth’s surface, atmosphere and oceans,” says EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. “However, the joint use of these programmes unleashes an array of synergies that can have a substantial impact.”

“Together, Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus deliver key information supporting the selection of the best location for infrastructures, implement the most fuel-efficient flight paths, monitor CO2 emissions, design efficient and autonomous transportation networks and increase agricultural yields to sustainably feed a growing population, to name just a few examples,” adds UNOOSA Director Simonetta Di Pippo. 

In other words, when it comes to determining how to best meet the UN SDGs, the answer can often be found in space. 

International collaboration on global goals 

Recognising the essential role that Earth Observation and European navigation and positioning services play in supporting sustainable development, and with the goal of leveraging their many benefits, EUSPA and UNOOSA have signed a new Memorandum of Understanding (MoU).

“I sign this MoU with great pride and excitement as UNOOSA is expanding its long-term cooperation with one of the leading space entities. The space sector in the European Union is strong and I look forward to working with EUSPA in extending our support to all Member States of our organisations. Space assets are transformative tools for achieving sustainable socio-economic development and together we aspire to tap into their full potential to ensure their benefits reach everyone, everywhere.” 

EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa, emphasized: “The collaboration between EUSPA and UNOOSA is further reinforced with this MoU, and fully aligned with our agency's commitment to contribute to the delivery of the EU priorities such as the EU Green Deal. Space data and services are more crucial than ever, and we will explore how synergies between satellite navigation systems such as Galileo, Earth observation technology such as Copernicus and satellite communication can help us address pressing societal challenges such as climate change and foster space economy.”

The MoU, which was signed on 9 March 2022, builds on the achievements of a prior MoU that the two organisations signed in 2016. Within the new MoU are provisions for conducting joint studies on the integration of not only EGNSS and Earth Observation, but also Satellite Communications and Space Situational Awareness (SSA). 

These studies will look at how the entire EU Space Programme can be used to manage natural resources and the environment, reduce the risks of disasters, develop new infrastructure and prepare the world for a growing population. 

As to the latter, EUSPA and UNOOSA are already working on a joint publication about the impact that a global population of 8 billion people will likely have on the environment, climate change, resource scarcity and urbanisation. The report, which is expected to be released later this year, will also address the role that space data and technology can play in mitigating such risks. 

In addition to the joint studies, EUSPA and UNOOSA will also coordinate to conduct pilot projects, facilitate knowledge sharing and education on the EU Space Programme, and foster a space economy that best supports the UN SDGs.  

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

In addition to joint studies, EUSPA and UNOOSA will coordinate to conduct pilot projects, facilitate knowledge sharing and education on the EU Space Programme, and foster a space economy that best supports the UN SDGs.

European space technology key to achieving a more sustainable future

9.3.2022 16:02  
In addition to joint studies, EUSPA and UNOOSA will coordinate to conduct pilot projects, facilitate knowledge sharing and education on the EU Space Programme, and foster a space economy that best supports the UN SDGs.
Published: 
09 March 2022

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) and the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOSSA) team up to leverage space technology.

Most are familiar with the United Nations (UN) Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the collection of 17 goals designed to serve as a blueprint for achieving a better, more sustainable future for everyone. But did you know that achieving these goals depends in part on the use of European space technologies?

That’s the conclusion reached by a joint report authored by the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) and the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA). “Galileo and EGNOS determine a precise position anytime, anywhere and Copernicus provides information on the Earth’s surface, atmosphere and oceans,” says EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. “However, the joint use of these programmes unleashes an array of synergies that can have a substantial impact.”

“Together, Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus deliver key information supporting the selection of the best location for infrastructures, implement the most fuel-efficient flight paths, monitor CO2 emissions, design efficient and autonomous transportation networks and increase agricultural yields to sustainably feed a growing population, to name just a few examples,” adds UNOOSA Director Simonetta Di Pippo. 

In other words, when it comes to determining how to best meet the UN SDGs, the answer can often be found in space. 

International collaboration on global goals 

Recognising the essential role that Earth Observation and European navigation and positioning services play in supporting sustainable development, and with the goal of leveraging their many benefits, EUSPA and UNOOSA have signed a new Memorandum of Understanding (MoU).

“I sign this MoU with great pride and excitement as UNOOSA is expanding its long-term cooperation with one of the leading space entities. The space sector in the European Union is strong and I look forward to working with EUSPA in extending our support to all Member States of our organisations. Space assets are transformative tools for achieving sustainable socio-economic development and together we aspire to tap into their full potential to ensure their benefits reach everyone, everywhere.” 

EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa, emphasized: “The collaboration between EUSPA and UNOOSA is further reinforced with this MoU, and fully aligned with our agency's commitment to contribute to the delivery of the EU priorities such as the EU Green Deal. Space data and services are more crucial than ever, and we will explore how synergies between satellite navigation systems such as Galileo, Earth observation technology such as Copernicus and satellite communication can help us address pressing societal challenges such as climate change and foster space economy.”

The MoU, which was signed on 9 March 2022, builds on the achievements of a prior MoU that the two organisations signed in 2016. Within the new MoU are provisions for conducting joint studies on the integration of not only EGNSS and Earth Observation, but also Satellite Communications and Space Situational Awareness (SSA). 

These studies will look at how the entire EU Space Programme can be used to manage natural resources and the environment, reduce the risks of disasters, develop new infrastructure and prepare the world for a growing population. 

As to the latter, EUSPA and UNOOSA are already working on a joint publication about the impact that a global population of 8 billion people will likely have on the environment, climate change, resource scarcity and urbanisation. The report, which is expected to be released later this year, will also address the role that space data and technology can play in mitigating such risks. 

In addition to the joint studies, EUSPA and UNOOSA will also coordinate to conduct pilot projects, facilitate knowledge sharing and education on the EU Space Programme, and foster a space economy that best supports the UN SDGs.  

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

In addition to joint studies, EUSPA and UNOOSA will coordinate to conduct pilot projects, facilitate knowledge sharing and education on the EU Space Programme, and foster a space economy that best supports the UN SDGs.

Updated agreement with Czech Republic gives EUSPA space to grow

8.3.2022 11:02  
The signing ceremony was also an opportunity for Minister Kupka to discuss several future initiatives, including the Czech Republic’s upcoming EU Presidency and its hosting of the 2022 EU Space Week.
Published: 
08 March 2022

The amended agreement, which was signed during an official ceremony at EUSPA’s Prague headquarters with Czech Republic Minister of Transport Martin Kupka, gives the agency the room and tools it needs to extend.

For the past 10 years, the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA, and its predecessor GSA) has had its base in the Czech Republic. 

Since then, both the EU Space Programme and the Czech Republic’s space sector have enjoyed continuous growth and development. For example, through various grants, Horizon calls and other funding mechanisms, EUSPA has provided - among other EU Member States - EUR 2.2 million to Czech start-ups, SMEs, enterprises and research initiatives – many of which are making a substantial contribution the EU’s robust space economy. 

EUSPA took new responsibilities in the frame of the EU Space Programme, and with thus itself continues to grow. The Agency will expand to around 300 staff from EU countries by 2024, to which are added in-house consultants and service providers, working across its various sites. 

The growth is driven by the new challenges the Agency faces – including the need for more space and advanced infrastructure, which is exactly what an amended host agreement between EUSPA and the Czech Republic provides.

"We have been working with the Czech authorities since day one and our relations have been excellent,” said EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. “This amended host agreement ensures that our home here in Prague aligns with our expanded mission and facilitates the ongoing growth of the EU Space Programme."

Da Costa made his remarks during an official signing ceremony held at EUSPA headquarters with Czech Minister of Transport Martin Kupka. 

"The Czech government has been working with EUSPA to secure appropriate new premises for the agency and I believe we are well on our way to achieve this goal. Today, we are here to take a necessary step along this way, to sign an amendment to the Host Agreement, which will allow us to relocate the seat of the agency to another site in Prague," confirmed Minister Kupka.

The amended host agreement includes provisions for a new headquarters, more robust ICT capabilities and enhanced security facilities, along with additional office space to accommodate EUSPA’s forecasted growth. 

The amendment follows a Memorandum of Understanding signed by EUSPA and the Czech government in April 2021, which was subsequently approved by the EUSPA Administrative Board in October 2021. Outside these amendments, all other conditions of the host agreement remain unchanged, including the provision that EUSPA cover 25% of local commercial leasing costs.     

“Prague offers a high quality of living, access to a skilled talent pool and great connections to the rest of Europe, making it a truly European city fit to host an EU agency,” added da Costa. “We look forward to developing our presence in continuing to call this vibrant city home and, together with the Ministry of Transport, contributing to growing the EU Space Programme and the European space economy.”   

The signing ceremony was also an opportunity for Minister Kupka to discuss several future initiatives, including the Czech Republic’s upcoming EU Presidency and its hosting of the 2022 EU Space Week.

In addition to its Prague headquarters, EUSPA has operations in France, Spain, the Netherlands, Germany, Italy and Belgium. 

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The signing ceremony was also an opportunity for Minister Kupka to discuss several future initiatives, including the Czech Republic’s upcoming EU Presidency and its hosting of the 2022 EU Space Week.

EUSPA welcomes ITRE committee members to its Prague headquarters

23.2.2022 17:21  
The ITRE Committee legislates on important policy areas of the European Union, such as industrial policy, EU research, and innovation policy, space policy, energy policy, and the application of new technologies.
Published: 
23 February 2022

The visit was an opportunity for EUSPA to highlight the many synergies between EGNSS and Copernicus, and how these synergies benefit EU businesses and citizens.

On 23 February, the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) welcomed representatives from the European Parliament’s Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE) to its Prague headquarters. The committee representatives were also joined by European Commission representatives for a full schedule of presentations, demonstrations and discussions.

The visit, the first since the new regulation on the EU Space Programme came into effect, was an opportunity for committee members and representatives to get a close-up look at how Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus support many of the activities and services that fall within the committee’s portfolio of responsibilities.   

“As custodians of the EU space policy, it’s crucial that the ITRE Committee continues to foster a strong partnership and collaboration with EUSPA’s team, who enable the policy to excel both here on earth and in space. We’re looking forward to hearing more about EUSPA’s management and protection of EU space infrastructure and how space-based innovation is increasingly brought in the daily lives of the EU citizens” declared ITRE Chair, Cristian Bușoi.

 A key topic of discussion was how best to leverage the EU Space Programme’s many synergies.

“The EU Space Programme benefits our society at many levels. For example, with EGNOS we improve the accessibility of our EU airports, whereas with certain Galileo features such as the OSNMA we can better protect critical infrastructures. Generating daily over 16TB of data, Copernicus is a helping hand in understanding climate change. With GOVSATCOM, Europe will be benefitting from a first of its kind secure and resilient satcom infrastructure for governmental users.” said EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. 

Security was also a key theme of the visit. EUSPA’s position as the gatekeeper of security for the EU Space Programme was emphasised, especially as it relates to the safeguarding of space-related assets, both in space and on the ground. The contribution of the EU Space Programme to the safety of European citizens was showcased through concrete applications, such as Galileo’s support to international Search and Rescue (SAR) satellite services, eCall technology and the Public Regulated Service (PRS).

EUSPA’s GOVSATCOM responsibilities were also highlighted. As the entity entrusted with the procurement of the secure operational ground segment (GOVSATCOM Hubs), its operations and the coordination of the user-related aspects of GOVSATCOM, EUSPA is focused on expanding infrastructure development and fostering technological innovation within the service.

In line with the recent report commissioned by the ITRE committee, which examined how to facilitate access and create an open and competitive space market, a presentation on the downstream market and its innovation was given. The presentation focused on the benefits of space products made within the EU, and included a hands-on demonstration of various space technologies and applications. Attendees were able to test out smartphone applications, drones and even a motorbike, all enabled by the EU Space Programme’s technology. 

Concluding the visit, the ITRE Committee and EUSPA agreed that maintaining alignment on the activities within the remit of the committee which are supported by EU space infrastructure will be key to further establishing a strong and competitive EU space sector. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The ITRE Committee legislates on important policy areas of the European Union, such as industrial policy, EU research, and innovation policy, space policy, energy policy, and the application of new technologies.

EUSPA welcomes ITRE committee members to its Prague headquarters

23.2.2022 17:21  
The ITRE Committee legislates on important policy areas of the European Union, such as industrial policy, EU research, and innovation policy, space policy, energy policy, and the application of new technologies.
Published: 
23 February 2022

The visit was an opportunity for EUSPA to highlight the many synergies between EGNSS and Copernicus, and how these synergies benefit EU businesses and citizens.

On 23 February, the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) welcomed representatives from the European Parliament’s Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE) to its Prague headquarters. The committee representatives were also joined by European Commission representatives for a full schedule of presentations, demonstrations and discussions.

The visit, the first since the new regulation on the EU Space Programme came into effect, was an opportunity for committee members and representatives to get a close-up look at how Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus support many of the activities and services that fall within the committee’s portfolio of responsibilities.   

“As custodians of the EU space policy, it’s crucial that the ITRE Committee continues to foster a strong partnership and collaboration with EUSPA’s team, who enable the policy to excel both here on earth and in space. We’re looking forward to hearing more about EUSPA’s management and protection of EU space infrastructure and how space-based innovation is increasingly brought in the daily lives of the EU citizens” declared ITRE Chair, Cristian Bușoi.

 A key topic of discussion was how best to leverage the EU Space Programme’s many synergies.

“The EU Space Programme benefits our society at many levels. For example, with EGNOS we improve the accessibility of our EU airports, whereas with certain Galileo features such as the OSNMA we can better protect critical infrastructures. Generating daily over 16TB of data, Copernicus is a helping hand in understanding climate change. With GOVSATCOM, Europe will be benefitting from a first of its kind secure and resilient satcom infrastructure for governmental users.” said EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa. 

Security was also a key theme of the visit. EUSPA’s position as the gatekeeper of security for the EU Space Programme was emphasised, especially as it relates to the safeguarding of space-related assets, both in space and on the ground. The contribution of the EU Space Programme to the safety of European citizens was showcased through concrete applications, such as Galileo’s support to international Search and Rescue (SAR) satellite services, eCall technology and the Public Regulated Service (PRS).

EUSPA’s GOVSATCOM responsibilities were also highlighted. As the entity entrusted with the procurement of the secure operational ground segment (GOVSATCOM Hubs), its operations and the coordination of the user-related aspects of GOVSATCOM, EUSPA is focused on expanding infrastructure development and fostering technological innovation within the service.

In line with the recent report commissioned by the ITRE committee, which examined how to facilitate access and create an open and competitive space market, a presentation on the downstream market and its innovation was given. The presentation focused on the benefits of space products made within the EU, and included a hands-on demonstration of various space technologies and applications. Attendees were able to test out smartphone applications, drones and even a motorbike, all enabled by the EU Space Programme’s technology. 

Concluding the visit, the ITRE Committee and EUSPA agreed that maintaining alignment on the activities within the remit of the committee which are supported by EU space infrastructure will be key to further establishing a strong and competitive EU space sector. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The ITRE Committee legislates on important policy areas of the European Union, such as industrial policy, EU research, and innovation policy, space policy, energy policy, and the application of new technologies.

EUSPA helps European companies embrace Earth Observation

21.2.2022 13:00  
Organised by the European Commission and the French Presidency of the Council of the EU, the Copernicus horizon 2035 Conference presented the Copernicus component of the EU Space Programme and its achievements, and highlight future goals and opportunities.
Published: 
21 February 2022

Speaking at last week’s Copernicus Horizon 2035 conference, EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa outlined how European businesses can benefit from Copernicus’ Earth observation services, data, and information.  

If you’ve ever watched a news story about a natural disaster, chances are, the satellite images shown in the story came from Copernicus, Europe’s Earth Observation programme. 

Why?

“Because Copernicus is the best Earth Observation system in the world,” said Thierry Breton, European Commissioner for the Internal Market, who made his remarks at Copernicus Horizon 2035

Organised by the French Presidency of the Council of the European Union and the European Commission, the conference, which was held 16 – 17 February, put the spotlight on Copernicus, its achievements, goals and opportunities.      

“By providing unique insights into the Earth and its environment, Copernicus helps governments, national agencies, institutions and researchers and of protect our planet for future generations,” said Rodrigo da Costa, Executive Director, European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA). ‘’But Copernicus is also of strategic importance to European SMEs, and we must ensure they make the most of the available date,’’ he concluded. Under the auspices of the European Commission, EUSPA is charged with promoting Copernicus’ services, data and market uptake.   

The commercial potential of Copernicus 

Beyond its use by governments and in emergency situations, Earth Observation also has significant commercial potential. For example, according to the latest edition of the EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report, SMEs and start-ups account for more than 93% of European Earth Observation companies. 

“Europe is seeing a vibrant Copernicus start-up scene unfolding, with hundreds of new ventures being created using Copernicus data and information,” noted Fiammetta Diani, EUSPA Head of Market, Downstream and Innovation, who also spoke at the conference.

With revenues set to double from approximately EUR 2.8 billion to over EUR 5.5 billion within the next decade, the market for Earth observation applications is boosted by a large pool of value-added services. This is especially the case within the climate services, urban development, energy, insurance, finance and agriculture segments.   

“Farmers can use Copernicus-derived information to monitor the health of their crops and study the quality of their soil,” explained da Costa. “And urban planners can use Earth Observation data to design sustainable smart cities and build infrastructure that is more resilient against the impact of climate change.”    

Copernicus also complements the other components of the EU Space Programmes, including Galileo and EGNOS. For example, construction companies can use European GNSS (EGNSS), together with Earth Observation, to first select locations with the best conditions and then monitor the building or infrastructure asset over its entire lifespan.   

Maximising Copernicus’ benefits

However, to truly maximise Copernicus’ economic and societal benefits, European companies must fully embrace the power of Earth Observation.

To help, EUSPA is in constant communication with European companies, helping them on how they can best leverage Copernicus data, information and services. 

“SMEs and start-ups are in the spotlight since they are key to enlarging the use of Copernicus. They are more agile, able to adjust new business models and technologies more swiftly. Besides, they can be closer to end-users and local authorities permitting them to innovate affordably,” said Diani.

EUSPA has also launched several Earth Observation focused funding opportunities for companies, including Horizon Calls and innovation competitions as part of the CASSINI programme focussing on entrepreneurs. 

“Our intent is to position EUSPA as the go-to-source for all things related to Earth Observation and EGNSS,” concluded da Costa. “That means to be the single point of information, expertise and market intelligence that companies from across Europe can depend on when integrating European space solutions into their start-ups, enterprises, innovations and research.”

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Organised by the European Commission and the French Presidency of the Council of the EU, the Copernicus horizon 2035 Conference presented the Copernicus component of the EU Space Programme and its achievements, and highlight future goals and opportunities

EUSPA helps European companies embrace Earth Observation

21.2.2022 13:00  
Published: 
21 February 2022

Speaking at last week’s Copernicus Horizon 2035 conference, EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa outlined how European businesses can benefit from Copernicus’ Earth observation services, data, and information.  

If you’ve ever watched a news story about a natural disaster, chances are, the satellite images shown in the story came from Copernicus, Europe’s Earth Observation programme. 

Why?

“Because Copernicus is the best Earth Observation system in the world,” said Thierry Breton, European Commissioner for the Internal Market, who made his remarks at Copernicus Horizon 2035

Organised by the French Presidency of the Council of the European Union and the European Commission, the conference, which was held 16 – 17 February, put the spotlight on Copernicus, its achievements, goals and opportunities.      

“By providing unique insights into the Earth and its environment, Copernicus helps governments, national agencies, institutions and researchers and of protect our planet for future generations,” said Rodrigo da Costa, Executive Director, European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA). ‘’But Copernicus is also of strategic importance to European SMEs, and we must ensure they make the most of the available date,’’ he concluded. Under the auspices of the European Commission, EUSPA is charged with promoting Copernicus’ services, data and market uptake.   

The commercial potential of Copernicus 

Beyond its use by governments and in emergency situations, Earth Observation also has significant commercial potential. For example, according to the latest edition of the EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report, SMEs and start-ups account for more than 93% of European Earth Observation companies. 

“Europe is seeing a vibrant Copernicus start-up scene unfolding, with hundreds of new ventures being created using Copernicus data and information,” noted Fiammetta Diani, EUSPA Head of Market, Downstream and Innovation, who also spoke at the conference.

With revenues set to double from approximately EUR 2.8 billion to over EUR 5.5 billion within the next decade, the market for Earth observation applications is boosted by a large pool of value-added services. This is especially the case within the climate services, urban development, energy, insurance, finance and agriculture segments.   

“Farmers can use Copernicus-derived information to monitor the health of their crops and study the quality of their soil,” explained da Costa. “And urban planners can use Earth Observation data to design sustainable smart cities and build infrastructure that is more resilient against the impact of climate change.”    

Copernicus also complements the other components of the EU Space Programmes, including Galileo and EGNOS. For example, construction companies can use European GNSS (EGNSS), together with Earth Observation, to first select locations with the best conditions and then monitor the building or infrastructure asset over its entire lifespan.   

Maximising Copernicus’ benefits

However, to truly maximise Copernicus’ economic and societal benefits, European companies must fully embrace the power of Earth Observation.

To help, EUSPA is in constant communication with European companies, helping them on how they can best leverage Copernicus data, information and services. 

“SMEs and start-ups are in the spotlight since they are key to enlarging the use of Copernicus. They are more agile, able to adjust new business models and technologies more swiftly. Besides, they can be closer to end-users and local authorities permitting them to innovate affordably,” said Diani.

EUSPA has also launched several Earth Observation focused funding opportunities for companies, including Horizon Calls and innovation competitions as part of the CASSINI programme focussing on entrepreneurs. 

“Our intent is to position EUSPA as the go-to-source for all things related to Earth Observation and EGNSS,” concluded da Costa. “That means to be the single point of information, expertise and market intelligence that companies from across Europe can depend on when integrating European space solutions into their start-ups, enterprises, innovations and research.”

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Organised by the European Commission and the French Presidency of the Council of the EU, the Copernicus horizon 2035 Conference presented the Copernicus component of the EU Space Programme and its achievements, and highlight future goals and opportunities

EUSPA helps European companies embrace Earth Observation

21.2.2022 13:00  
Organised by the European Commission and the French Presidency of the Council of the EU, the Copernicus horizon 2035 Conference presented the Copernicus component of the EU Space Programme and its achievements, and highlight future goals and opportunities
Published: 
21 February 2022

Speaking at last week’s Copernicus Horizon 2035 conference, EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa outlined how European businesses can benefit from Copernicus’ Earth observation services, data, and information.  

If you’ve ever watched a news story about a natural disaster, chances are, the satellite images shown in the story came from Copernicus, Europe’s Earth Observation programme. 

Why?

“Because Copernicus is the best Earth Observation system in the world,” said Thierry Breton, European Commissioner for the Internal Market, who made his remarks at Copernicus Horizon 2035

Organised by the French Presidency of the Council of the European Union and the European Commission, the conference, which was held 16 – 17 February, put the spotlight on Copernicus, its achievements, goals and opportunities.      

“By providing unique insights into the Earth and its environment, Copernicus helps governments, national agencies, institutions and researchers and of protect our planet for future generations,” said Rodrigo da Costa, Executive Director, European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA). ‘’But Copernicus is also of strategic importance to European SMEs, and we must ensure they make the most of the available date,’’ he concluded. Under the auspices of the European Commission, EUSPA is charged with promoting Copernicus’ services, data and market uptake.   

The commercial potential of Copernicus 

Beyond its use by governments and in emergency situations, Earth Observation also has significant commercial potential. For example, according to the latest edition of the EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report, SMEs and start-ups account for more than 93% of European Earth Observation companies. 

“Europe is seeing a vibrant Copernicus start-up scene unfolding, with hundreds of new ventures being created using Copernicus data and information,” noted Fiammetta Diani, EUSPA Head of Market, Downstream and Innovation, who also spoke at the conference.

With revenues set to double from approximately EUR 2.8 billion to over EUR 5.5 billion within the next decade, the market for Earth observation applications is boosted by a large pool of value-added services. This is especially the case within the climate services, urban development, energy, insurance, finance and agriculture segments.   

“Farmers can use Copernicus-derived information to monitor the health of their crops and study the quality of their soil,” explained da Costa. “And urban planners can use Earth Observation data to design sustainable smart cities and build infrastructure that is more resilient against the impact of climate change.”    

Copernicus also complements the other components of the EU Space Programmes, including Galileo and EGNOS. For example, construction companies can use European GNSS (EGNSS), together with Earth Observation, to first select locations with the best conditions and then monitor the building or infrastructure asset over its entire lifespan.   

Maximising Copernicus’ benefits

However, to truly maximise Copernicus’ economic and societal benefits, European companies must fully embrace the power of Earth Observation.

To help, EUSPA is in constant communication with European companies, helping them on how they can best leverage Copernicus data, information and services. 

“SMEs and start-ups are in the spotlight since they are key to enlarging the use of Copernicus. They are more agile, able to adjust new business models and technologies more swiftly. Besides, they can be closer to end-users and local authorities permitting them to innovate affordably,” said Diani.

EUSPA has also launched several Earth Observation focused funding opportunities for companies, including Horizon Calls and innovation competitions as part of the CASSINI programme focussing on entrepreneurs. 

“Our intent is to position EUSPA as the go-to-source for all things related to Earth Observation and EGNSS,” concluded da Costa. “That means to be the single point of information, expertise and market intelligence that companies from across Europe can depend on when integrating European space solutions into their start-ups, enterprises, innovations and research.”

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Organised by the European Commission and the French Presidency of the Council of the EU, the Copernicus horizon 2035 Conference presented the Copernicus component of the EU Space Programme and its achievements, and highlight future goals and opportunities

The Galileo Reference Centre evolves to support the constellation’s growing needs

18.2.2022 16:57  
Participants will also have the opportunity to learn more about the mission of the GRC’s, the procurement documentation and the submission process.
Published: 
18 February 2022

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) publishes procurement on “GRC Infrastructure evolution, nominal operations support, and maintenance”. To encourage the widest participation possible, the Agency is organizing an industry day to present the details of the call on 10 March 2022 at 10.00 CET

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) published a procurement on the “GRC Nominal Operations Support, Infrastructure Development, Evolution, and Maintenance”. To encourage large participation, EUSPA is organising an industry day to present the details of the call on 10 March 2022 at 10.00 CET. 

A service facility, located in Noordwijk, the Netherlands, the GRC performs independent service performance monitoring and reporting, service performance investigation and support, and campaign-based monitoring and experimentation, by itself and through cooperation with the EU Member States, Norway, and Switzerland. The GRC monitors not only Galileo but also other GNSSs and reports to various stakeholders.

The scope of the GRC Infrastructure Evolution, Nominal Operations Support, and Maintenance Framework Contract is to provide a turn-key service for GRC infrastructure releases (including operational validation activities), support the nominal operations, and follow up with the maintenance of the release in operation. It will include the design and implement an innovative solution for the next generation of the GRC. This will also include implementing a real-time solution into the GRC that will be capable of providing real-time monitoring of all Galileo services, precise reference time, and PRS navigation monitoring functionalities.

The GRC has a variety of tools developed for use within the facility as well as a strong operational team with a broad professional knowledge of GNSS systems and for these reasons greater functionalities are currently identified to be developed within the next generation of the GRC. 

With this important procurement, EUSPA is looking for one or more partners to provide services and supplies to support the agency in shaping the future versions of the GRC infrastructure to support the evolutions of several GNSS services. 

EUSPA is committed to promoting the widest participation possible by economic operators, including new entrants, in particular start-ups and SMEs. The agency is thus organising an industry day on 10 March 2022 at 10.00 to detail the procurement on “GRC Nominal Operations Support, Infrastructure Development, Evolution, and Maintenance”. 

Participants will also have the opportunity to learn more about the mission of the GRC, the procurement documentation, and the submission process.

To attend the event, please register here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Participants will also have the opportunity to learn more about the mission of the GRC’s, the procurement documentation and the submission process.

The Galileo Reference Centre evolves to support the constellation’s growing needs

18.2.2022 16:57  
Participants will also have the opportunity to learn more about the mission of the GRC’s, the procurement documentation and the submission process.
Published: 
17 February 2022

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) publishes procurement on “GRC Infrastructure evolution, nominal operations support, and maintenance”. To encourage the widest participation possible, the Agency is organizing an industry day to present the details of the call on 10 March 2022 at 10.00 CET

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) published a procurement on the “GRC Nominal Operations Support, Infrastructure Development, Evolution, and Maintenance”. To encourage large participation, EUSPA is organising an industry day to present the details of the call on 10 March 2022 at 10.00 CET. 

A service facility, located in Noordwijk, the Netherlands, the GRC performs independent service performance monitoring and reporting, service performance investigation and support, and campaign-based monitoring and experimentation, by itself and through cooperation with the EU Member States, Norway, and Switzerland. The GRC monitors not only Galileo but also other GNSSs and reports to various stakeholders.

The scope of the GRC Infrastructure Evolution, Nominal Operations Support, and Maintenance Framework Contract is to provide a turn-key service for GRC infrastructure releases (including operational validation activities), support the nominal operations, and follow up with the maintenance of the release in operation. It will include the design and implement an innovative solution for the next generation of the GRC. This will also include implementing a real-time solution into the GRC that will be capable of providing real-time monitoring of all Galileo services, precise reference time, and PRS navigation monitoring functionalities.

The GRC has a variety of tools developed for use within the facility as well as a strong operational team with a broad professional knowledge of GNSS systems and for these reasons greater functionalities are currently identified to be developed within the next generation of the GRC. 

With this important procurement, EUSPA is looking for one or more partners to provide services and supplies to support the agency in shaping the future versions of the GRC infrastructure to support the evolutions of several GNSS services. 

EUSPA is committed to promoting the widest participation possible by economic operators, including new entrants, in particular start-ups and SMEs. The agency is thus organising an industry day on 10 March 2022 at 10.00 to detail the procurement on “GRC Nominal Operations Support, Infrastructure Development, Evolution, and Maintenance”. 

Participants will also have the opportunity to learn more about the mission of the GRC, the procurement documentation, and the submission process.

To attend the event, please register here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Participants will also have the opportunity to learn more about the mission of the GRC’s, the procurement documentation and the submission process.

Galileo Service Operator: a vital link between space and user needs

17.2.2022 13:33  
27 and 29 January 2022 marked an important milestone in the life of Galileo GSAT0223 and GSAT0224 launched on 5 December 2021.
Published: 
17 February 2022

With a robust and secure ground and space segment, EUSPA ensures that Galileo’s 2.5 billion users benefit from the world’s most precise positioning system

Not only is the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) charged with the development and provision of Galileo’s range of services, it also serves as the gatekeeper for the programme’s security. 

This means protecting Galileo’s space and ground operations against threats such as cyber-attacks, interference and damage by space debris – a job EUSPA does in collaboration with its industry partners.    

One of those partners is Spaceopal, a joint venture between Telespazio in Italy and DLR-GfR mbH in Germany. 

Under EUSPA’s leadership, Spaceopal serves as the Galileo Service Operator, a role that involves operating and maintaining Galileo’s ground and space segments, along with ensuring that all of Galileo’s 2.5 billion users continue to benefit from the world’s most precise positioning system. The company’s role as Galileo Service Operator has just been confirmed for the next 5 years.

High performance services worldwide 

Launched in 2016, Galileo is Europe’s Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). In addition to providing positioning information with greater precision than other GNSS systems, Galileo also offers a Search and Rescue (SAR) service. This important service allows emergency first responders to quickly locate and help people in distress while giving them feedback that the call has been received by its unique … etc.

EUSPA is also developing new Galileo services, including a High Accuracy Service (HAS) for high accuracy corrections, and the a authentication service Open Service Navigation Message Authentication service (OSNMA), which will provide receivers with a first level of protection against manipulation and spoofing. 

A robust and secure ground and space segment 

All these services depend on having a robust and secure ground and space segment, which is exactly what EUSPA’s contract with Spaceopal guarantees. For example, as the Galileo Service Operator, Spaceopal will run EUSPA’s Galileo Control Centres (GCC) in Fucino, Italy and Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany. 

Backed by a network of ground stations and facilities spread around the globe, the GCCs allow EUSPA to monitor and control Galileo’s current constellation of satellites, along with the addition of new ones (such as Galileo Launch 12 expected later this year, which – like every additional satellite added to the constellation - will bring an additional layer of accuracy to Galileo services).  

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

27 and 29 January 2022 marked an important milestone in the life of Galileo GSAT0223 and GSAT0224 launched on 5 December 2021.

Galileo Service Operator: a vital link between space and user needs

17.2.2022 13:33  
27 and 29 January 2022 marked an important milestone in the life of Galileo GSAT0223 and GSAT0224 launched on 5 December 2021.
Published: 
17 February 2022

With a robust and secure ground and space segment, EUSPA ensures that Galileo’s 2.5 billion users benefit from the world’s most precise positioning system

Not only is the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) charged with the development and provision of Galileo’s range of services, it also serves as the gatekeeper for the programme’s security. 

This means protecting Galileo’s space and ground operations against threats such as cyber-attacks, interference and damage by space debris – a job EUSPA does in collaboration with its industry partners.    

One of those partners is Spaceopal, a joint venture between Telespazio in Italy and DLR-GfR mbH in Germany. 

Under EUSPA’s leadership, Spaceopal serves as the Galileo Service Operator, a role that involves operating and maintaining Galileo’s ground and space segments, along with ensuring that all of Galileo’s 2.5 billion users continue to benefit from the world’s most precise positioning system. The company’s role as Galileo Service Operator has just been confirmed for the next 5 years.

High performance services worldwide 

Launched in 2016, Galileo is Europe’s Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). In addition to providing positioning information with greater precision than other GNSS systems, Galileo also offers a Search and Rescue (SAR) service. This important service allows emergency first responders to quickly locate and help people in distress while giving them feedback that the call has been received by its unique Return Link Service.

EUSPA is also developing new Galileo services, including a High Accuracy Service (HAS) for high accuracy corrections, and the authentication service Open Service Navigation Message Authentication service (OSNMA), which will provide receivers with a first level of protection against manipulation and spoofing. 

A robust and secure ground and space segment 

All these services depend on having a robust and secure ground and space segment, which is exactly what EUSPA’s contract with Spaceopal guarantees. For example, as the Galileo Service Operator, Spaceopal will run EUSPA’s Galileo Control Centres (GCC) in Fucino, Italy and Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany. 

Backed by a network of ground stations and facilities spread around the globe, the GCCs allow EUSPA to monitor and control Galileo’s current constellation of satellites, along with the addition of new ones (such as Galileo Launch 12 expected later this year, which – like every additional satellite added to the constellation - will bring an additional layer of accuracy to Galileo services).  

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

27 and 29 January 2022 marked an important milestone in the life of Galileo GSAT0223 and GSAT0224 launched on 5 December 2021.

GOVSATCOM adds secure governmental communications to the EU Space Programme

14.2.2022 16:38  
Complementing Copernicus, Galileo, EGNOS, and the forthcoming GOVSATCOM, this new EU flagship programme, will benefit a broad range of sectors, including road and maritime transport, air traffic and more.
Published: 
14 February 2022

When disaster strikes, communication, information and location are key. With the addition of GOVSATCOM, the EU Space Programme provides all three. 

Last summer, when Greece was ravaged by wildfires, public authorities relied on Copernicus’ Earth Observation services to detect and monitor the evolving situation. On the ground, firefighters and emergency first responders used EGNOS and Galileo to safely guide themselves through the smoke, fog and flames.     

That same summer, when once-in-a-century floods in Germany, Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg rendered transportation and communication infrastructure useless, satellite communication, working in synergy with Copernicus and European GNSS (EGNSS), provided rescue teams with the spatial awareness, connectivity and highly accurate positioning and navigation they needed to save lives.  

But what happens when an incident occurs where there are no ground stations, either because they were destroyed (e.g., during an earthquake) or because they never existed in the first place (e.g., in remote regions such as the Arctic)? Or what if the end users require secure communication? Such is the case during cyber-attacks and other security-related incidents.

For situations like these, there’s GOVSATCOM

Adding assured, secure communication to the EU Space Programme’s current capabilities 

GOVSATCOM is the fourth pillar of the EU Space Programme. While Copernicus and EGNSS provide the necessary data and positioning, some security incidents also require a means of communication that is robustly protected against interference, interception, intrusion and other risks. GOVSATCOM bridges this gap between the need for assured and secure communication and the capabilities already offered by Copernicus, Galileo and EGNOS.

Once active, GOVSATCOM will provide secure, cost-efficient communication capabilities to security and safety-critical missions, operations and infrastructure. The European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) has been entrusted with the procurement of the secure operational ground segment (GOVSATCOM Hubs), its operations and the coordination of the user-related aspects of GOVSATCOM, all in close collaboration with Member States and other involved entities.

As a user-centric programme, GOVSATCOM is designed to meet the unique requirements of governmental applications, including those used for crisis management, surveillance and the management of key infrastructures. Further, to successfully execute their missions, governmental actors must have access to secure satellite communication services, which is something commercial satellite communication services aren’t able to provide. 

Keeping EU citizens safe and secure 

GOVSATCOM users will likely include border and maritime authorities, law enforcement agencies, civil protection forces, search and rescue services, disaster relief and humanitarian missions, authorised infrastructure operators and military forces. The service will be available to EU institutions, relevant agencies and EU Member States. 

GOVSATCOM will also serve specific use cases, such as providing connectivity to the Arctic region and for Machine to Machine (M2M) and Internet of Things (IoT) communications. Furthermore, it will be a central component to the EU’s Secure Connectivity Initiative, which is expected to provide additional EU-owned satellite communications resources to complement existing assets. 

With its multiorbital design, Secure Connectivity will allow low latency governmental communications, while its use of quantum technologies will take the security of GOVSATCOM services to the next level. With such capabilities, GOVSATCOM could play an even bigger role in the air traffic control infrastructure that will enable the autonomous and remotely piloted aircraft systems of tomorrow, including drones and air taxis.  

Most importantly, by working in synergy with Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus, GOVSATCOM will further enhance the EU Space Programme’s ability to keep European citizens safe and secure.  

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Complementing Copernicus, Galileo, EGNOS, and the forthcoming GOVSATCOM, this new EU flagship programme, will benefit a broad range of sectors, including road and maritime transport, air traffic and more.

GOVSATCOM adds secure governmental communications to the EU Space Programme

14.2.2022 16:38  
Complementing Copernicus, Galileo, EGNOS, and the forthcoming GOVSATCOM, this new EU flagship programme, will benefit a broad range of sectors, including road and maritime transport, air traffic and more.
Published: 
14 February 2022

When disaster strikes, communication, information and location are key. With the addition of GOVSATCOM, the EU Space Programme provides all three. 

Last summer, when Greece was ravaged by wildfires, public authorities relied on Copernicus’ Earth Observation services to detect and monitor the evolving situation. On the ground, firefighters and emergency first responders used EGNOS and Galileo to safely guide themselves through the smoke, fog and flames.     

That same summer, when once-in-a-century floods in Germany, Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg rendered transportation and communication infrastructure useless, satellite communication, working in synergy with Copernicus and European GNSS (EGNSS), provided rescue teams with the spatial awareness, connectivity and highly accurate positioning and navigation they needed to save lives.  

But what happens when an incident occurs where there are no ground stations, either because they were destroyed (e.g., during an earthquake) or because they never existed in the first place (e.g., in remote regions such as the Arctic)? Or what if the end users require secure communication? Such is the case during cyber-attacks and other security-related incidents.

For situations like these, there’s GOVSATCOM

Adding assured, secure communication to the EU Space Programme’s current capabilities 

GOVSATCOM is the fourth pillar of the EU Space Programme. While Copernicus and EGNSS provide the necessary data and positioning, some security incidents also require a means of communication that is robustly protected against interference, interception, intrusion and other risks. GOVSATCOM bridges this gap between the need for assured and secure communication and the capabilities already offered by Copernicus, Galileo and EGNOS.

Once active, GOVSATCOM will provide secure, cost-efficient communication capabilities to security and safety-critical missions, operations and infrastructure. The European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) has been entrusted with the procurement of the secure operational ground segment (GOVSATCOM Hubs), its operations and the coordination of the user-related aspects of GOVSATCOM, all in close collaboration with Member States and other involved entities.

As a user-centric programme, GOVSATCOM is designed to meet the unique requirements of governmental applications, including those used for crisis management, surveillance and the management of key infrastructures. Further, to successfully execute their missions, governmental actors must have access to secure satellite communication services, which is something commercial satellite communication services aren’t able to provide. 

Keeping EU citizens safe and secure 

GOVSATCOM users will likely include border and maritime authorities, law enforcement agencies, civil protection forces, search and rescue services, disaster relief and humanitarian missions, authorised infrastructure operators and military forces. The service will be available to EU institutions, relevant agencies and EU Member States. 

GOVSATCOM will also serve specific use cases, such as providing connectivity to the Arctic region and for Machine to Machine (M2M) and Internet of Things (IoT) communications. Furthermore, it will be a central component to the EU’s Secure Connectivity Initiative, which is expected to provide additional EU-owned satellite communications resources to complement existing assets. 

With its multiorbital design, Secure Connectivity will allow low latency governmental communications, while its use of quantum technologies will take the security of GOVSATCOM services to the next level. With such capabilities, GOVSATCOM could play an even bigger role in the air traffic control infrastructure that will enable the autonomous and remotely piloted aircraft systems of tomorrow, including drones and air taxis.  

Most importantly, by working in synergy with Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus, GOVSATCOM will further enhance the EU Space Programme’s ability to keep European citizens safe and secure.  

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Complementing Copernicus, Galileo, EGNOS, and the forthcoming GOVSATCOM, this new EU flagship programme, will benefit a broad range of sectors, including road and maritime transport, air traffic and more.

GOVSATCOM adds secure governmental communications to the EU Space Programme

14.2.2022 16:38  
Complementing Copernicus, Galileo, EGNOS, and the forthcoming GOVSATCOM, this new EU flagship programme, will benefit a broad range of sectors, including road and maritime transport, air traffic and more.
Published: 
14 February 2022

When disaster strikes, communication, information and location are key. With the addition of GOVSATCOM, the EU Space Programme provides all three. 

Last summer, when Greece was ravaged by wildfires, public authorities relied on Copernicus’ Earth Observation services to detect and monitor the evolving situation. On the ground, firefighters and emergency first responders used EGNOS and Galileo to safely guide themselves through the smoke, fog and flames.     

That same summer, when once-in-a-century floods in Germany, Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg rendered transportation and communication infrastructure useless, satellite communication, working in synergy with Copernicus and European GNSS (EGNSS), provided rescue teams with the spatial awareness, connectivity and highly accurate positioning and navigation they needed to save lives.  

But what happens when an incident occurs where there are no ground stations, either because they were destroyed (e.g., during an earthquake) or because they never existed in the first place (e.g., in remote regions such as the Arctic)? Or what if the end users require secure communication? Such is the case during cyber-attacks and other security-related incidents.

For situations like these, there’s GOVSATCOM

Adding assured, secure communication to the EU Space Programme’s current capabilities 

GOVSATCOM is the fourth pillar of the EU Space Programme. While Copernicus and EGNSS provide the necessary data and positioning, some security incidents also require a means of communication that is robustly protected against interference, interception, intrusion and other risks. GOVSATCOM bridges this gap between the need for assured and secure communication and the capabilities already offered by Copernicus, Galileo and EGNOS.

Once active, GOVSATCOM will provide secure, cost-efficient communication capabilities to security and safety-critical missions, operations and infrastructure. The European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) has been entrusted with the procurement of the secure operational ground segment (GOVSATCOM Hubs), its operations and the coordination of the user-related aspects of GOVSATCOM, all in close collaboration with Member States and other involved entities.

As a user-centric programme, GOVSATCOM is designed to meet the unique requirements of governmental applications, including those used for crisis management, surveillance and the management of key infrastructures. Further, to successfully execute their missions, governmental actors must have access to secure satellite communication services, which is something commercial satellite communication services aren’t able to provide. 

Keeping EU citizens safe and secure 

GOVSATCOM users will likely include border and maritime authorities, law enforcement agencies, civil protection forces, search and rescue services, disaster relief and humanitarian missions, authorised infrastructure operators and military forces. The service will be available to EU institutions, relevant agencies and EU Member States. 

GOVSATCOM will also serve specific use cases, such as providing connectivity to the Arctic region and for Machine to Machine (M2M) and Internet of Things (IoT) communications. Furthermore, it will be a central component to the EU’s Secure Connectivity Initiative, which is expected to provide additional EU-owned satellite communications resources to complement existing assets. 

With its multiorbital design, Secure Connectivity will allow low latency governmental communications, while its use of quantum technologies will take the security of GOVSATCOM services to the next level. With such capabilities, GOVSATCOM could play an even bigger role in the air traffic control infrastructure that will enable the autonomous and remotely piloted aircraft systems of tomorrow, including drones and air taxis.  

Most importantly, by working in synergy with Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus, GOVSATCOM will further enhance the EU Space Programme’s ability to keep European citizens safe and secure.  

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (https://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Complementing Copernicus, Galileo, EGNOS, and the forthcoming GOVSATCOM, this new EU flagship programme, will benefit a broad range of sectors, including road and maritime transport, air traffic and more.

The European 112-emergency number to reach new heights thanks to Galileo

11.2.2022 14:07  
Galileo-supported E112 will result in faster response times and more lives saved
Published: 
11 February 2022

As of March 17, 2022, all smartphones sold in the European Union should be leveraging Galileo signals, in addition to other Global Navigation Satellite Systems. The addition of the EU positioning system to enhance the 112-calls location will result in faster response times and consequently, more lives saved.

The European 112-emergency number is operational in nearly all EU Member States, as well as other countries. People in danger can call it 24/7 to reach the fire brigade, medical assistance and the police. On February 11, which is European 112 Day, various awareness and networking activities are organised throughout the EU to promote the existence and use of Europe's single emergency number. 

The majority of phone calls to the 112-emergency number are placed from mobile phones. These calls already support the sending of location information to emergency services. However, this information was not based on Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) capabilities until recently.

Three years ago, the Commission Delegated Regulation anticipated measures to get advantage of GNSS and WiFi location capabilities in smartphones placed on the European Union market from 17 March 2022 onward. This will enable smartphones to transfer caller location information from GNSS (at least Galileo) to the appropriate emergency service.

How does 112 work in Europe?

So far, in the event of a 112 call, the caller’s location information was established through identification technology based on the coverage area of a cellular network tower (cell-ID). The average accuracy of this information varies from two to ten kilometres, which can lead to significant search errors following emergency calls, often resulting in time wasted and potentially, lives lost. In contrast, location information based on GNSS provides an accuracy of down to a few metres. This level of accuracy will have a major impact in terms of response times, ultimately allowing for quicker intervention in emergency situations in which every second counts. 

Galileo contributing to saving lives across Europe

The ability for 112 to communicate a caller’s location to emergency services automatically is already being rolled out. The protocol designed for this purpose, called Advanced Mobile Location (AML) is currently being deployed across the European Union. When a caller dials 112 from their smartphone, AML uses the phone’s integrated functionalities and data from Galileo to accurately pinpoint the caller’s location and transmit it to a dedicated end-point, usually a Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP), which makes the caller location available to emergency responders in real-time.

According to the European Emergency Number Association (EENA), at least 18 EU Member States have already completed the AML deployment while others are in the process of doing so. This implementation is thanks to EU initiatives and projects such as the Help 112 project, which was set up to evaluate the merits of handset-based technologies in improving the location of emergency callers..

“On the occasion of European 112 Day, I would like to reiterate once again that the EU Space Programme and in this particular case, Galileo, were conceived to benefit and protect EU citizens. The EC regulation which shall enter into force late next month is another confirmation of the added value EU space data brings to our daily lives,’’ said EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa. ‘’On this day, let’s also praise our real-life heroes, emergency responders, across the EU for their courage and bravery,’’ he concluded.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).
Galileo-supported E112 will result in faster response times and more lives saved

The European 112-emergency number to reach new heights thanks to Galileo

11.2.2022 14:07  
Galileo-supported E112 will result in faster response times and more lives saved
Published: 
11 February 2022

As of 17 March 2022, all smartphones placed in the European single market should be leveraging Galileo signals, in addition to other Global Navigation Satellite Systems. The addition of the EU positioning system to enhance the 112-calls location will result in faster response times and consequently, more lives saved.

The European 112-emergency number is operational in nearly all EU Member States, as well as other countries. People in danger can call it 24/7 to reach the fire brigade, medical assistance and the police. On February 11, which is European 112 Day, various awareness and networking activities are organised throughout the EU to promote the existence and use of Europe's single emergency number. 

The majority of phone calls to the 112-emergency number are placed from mobile phones. These calls already support the sending of location information to emergency services. However, this information was not based on Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) capabilities until recently.

Three years ago, the Commission Delegated Regulation anticipated measures to get advantage of GNSS and WiFi location capabilities in smartphones placed on the European Union market from 17 March 2022 onward. This will enable smartphones to transfer caller location information from GNSS (at least Galileo) to the appropriate emergency service.

How does 112 work in Europe?

So far, in the event of a 112 call, the caller’s location information was established through identification technology based on the coverage area of a cellular network tower (cell-ID). The average accuracy of this information varies from two to ten kilometres, which can lead to significant search errors following emergency calls, often resulting in time wasted and potentially, lives lost. In contrast, location information based on GNSS provides an accuracy of down to a few metres. This level of accuracy will have a major impact in terms of response times, ultimately allowing for quicker intervention in emergency situations in which every second counts. 

Galileo contributing to saving lives across Europe

The ability for 112 to communicate a caller’s location to emergency services automatically is already being rolled out. The protocol designed for this purpose, called Advanced Mobile Location (AML) is currently being deployed across the European Union. When a caller dials 112 from their smartphone, AML uses the phone’s integrated functionalities and data from Galileo to accurately pinpoint the caller’s location and transmit it to a dedicated end-point, usually a Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP), which makes the caller location available to emergency responders in real-time.

According to the European Emergency Number Association (EENA), at least 18 EU Member States have already completed the AML deployment while others are in the process of doing so. This implementation is thanks to EU initiatives and projects such as the Help 112 project, which was set up to evaluate the merits of handset-based technologies in improving the location of emergency callers..

“On the occasion of European 112 Day, I would like to reiterate once again that the EU Space Programme and in this particular case, Galileo, were conceived to benefit and protect EU citizens. The EC regulation which shall enter into force late next month is another confirmation of the added value EU space data brings to our daily lives,’’ said EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa. ‘’On this day, let’s also praise our real-life heroes, emergency responders, across the EU for their courage and bravery,’’ he concluded.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (https://www.euspa.europa.eu).
Galileo-supported E112 will result in faster response times and more lives saved

As of 17 March 2022, all smartphones placed in the European Single Market should be leveraging Galileo signals

11.2.2022 14:07  
Galileo-supported E112 will result in faster response times and more lives saved
Published: 
17 March 2022

As of 17 March 2022, all smartphones placed in the European single market should be leveraging Galileo signals, in addition to other Global Navigation Satellite Systems. The addition of the EU positioning system to enhance the 112-calls location will result in faster response times and consequently, more lives saved.

The European 112-emergency number is operational in nearly all EU Member States, as well as other countries. People in danger can call it 24/7 to reach the fire brigade, medical assistance and the police.

The majority of phone calls to the 112-emergency number are placed from mobile phones. These calls already support the sending of location information to emergency services. However, this information was not based on Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) capabilities until recently.

Three years ago, the Commission Delegated Regulation anticipated measures to get advantage of GNSS and WiFi location capabilities in smartphones placed on the European Union market from 17 March 2022 onward. This will enable smartphones to transfer caller location information from GNSS (at least Galileo) to the appropriate emergency service.

How does 112 work in Europe?

So far, in the event of a 112 call, the caller’s location information was established through identification technology based on the coverage area of a cellular network tower (cell-ID). The average accuracy of this information varies from two to ten kilometres, which can lead to significant search errors following emergency calls, often resulting in time wasted and potentially, lives lost. In contrast, location information based on GNSS provides an accuracy of down to a few metres. This level of accuracy will have a major impact in terms of response times, ultimately allowing for quicker intervention in emergency situations in which every second counts. 

Galileo contributing to saving lives across Europe

The ability for 112 to communicate a caller’s location to emergency services automatically is already being rolled out. The protocol designed for this purpose, called Advanced Mobile Location (AML) is currently being deployed across the European Union. When a caller dials 112 from their smartphone, AML uses the phone’s integrated functionalities and data from Galileo to accurately pinpoint the caller’s location and transmit it to a dedicated end-point, usually a Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP), which makes the caller location available to emergency responders in real-time.

According to the European Emergency Number Association (EENA), at least 18 EU Member States have already completed the AML deployment while others are in the process of doing so. This implementation is thanks to EU initiatives and projects such as the Help 112 project, which was set up to evaluate the merits of handset-based technologies in improving the location of emergency callers..

“On the occasion of European 112 Day, I would like to reiterate once again that the EU Space Programme and in this particular case, Galileo, were conceived to benefit and protect EU citizens. The EC regulation which enters into force today is another confirmation of the added value EU space data brings to our daily lives,’’ said EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa. ‘’On this day, let’s also praise our real-life heroes, emergency responders, across the EU for their courage and bravery,’’ he concluded.

 

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (https://www.euspa.europa.eu).
Galileo-supported E112 will result in faster response times and more lives saved

The European 112-emergency number to reach new heights thanks to Galileo

11.2.2022 14:07  
Galileo-supported E112 will result in faster response times and more lives saved
Published: 
11 February 2022

As of March 17, 2022, all smartphones sold in the European Union should be leveraging Galileo signals, in addition to other Global Navigation Satellite Systems. The addition of the EU positioning system to enhance the 112-calls location will result in faster response times and consequently, more lives saved.

The European 112-emergency number is operational in nearly all EU Member States, as well as other countries. People in danger can call it 24/7 to reach the fire brigade, medical assistance and the police. On February 11, which is European 112 Day, various awareness and networking activities are organised throughout the EU to promote the existence and use of Europe's single emergency number. 

The majority of phone calls to the 112-emergency number are placed from mobile phones. These calls already support the sending of location information to emergency services. However, this information was not based on Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) capabilities until recently.

Three years ago, the Commission Delegated Regulation anticipated measures to get advantage of GNSS and WiFi location capabilities in smartphones placed on the European Union market from 17 March 2022 onward. This will enable smartphones to transfer caller location information from GNSS (at least Galileo) to the appropriate emergency service.

How does 112 work in Europe?

So far, in the event of a 112 call, the caller’s location information was established through identification technology based on the coverage area of a cellular network tower (cell-ID). The average accuracy of this information varies from two to ten kilometres, which can lead to significant search errors following emergency calls, often resulting in time wasted and potentially, lives lost. In contrast, location information based on GNSS provides an accuracy of down to a few metres. This level of accuracy will have a major impact in terms of response times, ultimately allowing for quicker intervention in emergency situations in which every second counts. 

Galileo contributing to saving lives across Europe

The ability for 112 to communicate a caller’s location to emergency services automatically is already being rolled out. The protocol designed for this purpose, called Advanced Mobile Location (AML) is currently being deployed across the European Union. When a caller dials 112 from their smartphone, AML uses the phone’s integrated functionalities and data from Galileo to accurately pinpoint the caller’s location and transmit it to a dedicated end-point, usually a Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP), which makes the caller location available to emergency responders in real-time.

According to the European Emergency Number Association (EENA), at least 18 EU Member States have already completed the AML deployment while others are in the process of doing so. This implementation is thanks to EU initiatives and projects such as the Help 112 project, which was set up to evaluate the merits of handset-based technologies in improving the location of emergency callers..

“On the occasion of European 112 Day, I would like to reiterate once again that the EU Space Programme and in this particular case, Galileo, were conceived to benefit and protect EU citizens. The EC regulation which shall enter into force late next month is another confirmation of the added value EU space data brings to our daily lives,’’ said EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa. ‘’On this day, let’s also praise our real-life heroes, emergency responders, across the EU for their courage and bravery,’’ he concluded.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (https://www.euspa.europa.eu).
Galileo-supported E112 will result in faster response times and more lives saved

EUSPA launches testing campaign for INAV improvements implementation

9.2.2022 13:08  
The present European GNSS (Galileo) Open Service Signal-In-Space Interface Control Document (OS SIS ICD) Issue 2.0 contains the publicly available information on the Galileo Signal-In-Space.
Published: 
09 February 2022

The European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is launching a testing campaign for INAV improvements implementation and hereby invites external stakeholders to express their interest in participating in such testing campaign. 

The testing will cover any of the three I/NAV improvements (SSP, FEC-2, RedCED), that will be tested in laboratory using simulated realistic scenarios, including open sky as well as impaired environments. The tests will allow the participants to have confirmation of the correct implementation of the OSSISICD 2.0. In case of specific interest, legacy receivers (e.g. not implementing I/NAV improvements) could be also tested, solely at the scope of confirming that they are not impacted anyhow by the introduction of the new I/NAV capabilities (backward compatibility is in any case guaranteed “by design” for any receiver that is fully compliant with the Galileo OS SIS ICD provisions, and referring in particular to section 4.1.2). 

The characteristics of the testing campaign are described here.

The interested participants may be invited to provide their product(s) before 15 March, 1 May or 1 August to the premises indicated below according to the terms and conditions that will be communicated by the agency and be ready to provide any remote technical assistance needed during the testing as well as all the necessary interface documentation required for the testing. Any further detailed provision, including the possibility to provide the testing laboratories with ad-hoc receiver development platforms facilitating the testing activities, will be discussed with the interested participants.

The tests will be executed at the laboratories of the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy, and of the European Space Agency ESA/ESTEC in Noordwijk, The Netherlands. Each applicant will be assigned by EUSPA to any of the two laboratories depending on the specific conditions and availability.

Testing is currently foreseen to be done in three batches, starting on 15 March, 1 May and 1 August 2022. The EUSPA reserves the right to change the scope, and timeline of the procedure.

Express you interest 

If you are interested in participating in the testing campaign above, please express your interest by sending an email before 25/02/2022, 17:00 (Prague local time) to the following email address: market@euspa.europa.eu. The subject of the email shall be “INAV improvements implementation testing campaign”.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The present European GNSS (Galileo) Open Service Signal-In-Space Interface Control Document (OS SIS ICD) Issue 2.0 contains the publicly available information on the Galileo Signal-In-Space.

EUSPA launches testing campaign for INAV improvements implementation

9.2.2022 13:08  
The present European GNSS (Galileo) Open Service Signal-In-Space Interface Control Document (OS SIS ICD) Issue 2.0 contains the publicly available information on the Galileo Signal-In-Space.
Published: 
09 February 2022

The European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is launching a testing campaign for INAV improvements implementation and hereby invites external stakeholders to express their interest in participating in such testing campaign. 

The testing will cover any of the three I/NAV improvements (SSP, FEC-2, RedCED), that will be tested in laboratory using simulated realistic scenarios, including open sky as well as impaired environments. The tests will allow the participants to have confirmation of the correct implementation of the OSSISICD 2.0. In case of specific interest, legacy receivers (e.g. not implementing I/NAV improvements) could be also tested, solely at the scope of confirming that they are not impacted anyhow by the introduction of the new I/NAV capabilities (backward compatibility is in any case guaranteed “by design” for any receiver that is fully compliant with the Galileo OS SIS ICD provisions, and referring in particular to section 4.1.2). 

The characteristics of the testing campaign are described here.

The interested participants may be invited to provide their product(s) before 15 March, 1 May or 1 August to the premises indicated below according to the terms and conditions that will be communicated by the agency and be ready to provide any remote technical assistance needed during the testing as well as all the necessary interface documentation required for the testing. Any further detailed provision, including the possibility to provide the testing laboratories with ad-hoc receiver development platforms facilitating the testing activities, will be discussed with the interested participants.

The tests will be executed at the laboratories of the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy, and of the European Space Agency ESA/ESTEC in Noordwijk, The Netherlands. Each applicant will be assigned by EUSPA to any of the two laboratories depending on the specific conditions and availability.

Testing is currently foreseen to be done in three batches, starting on 15 March, 1 May and 1 August 2022. The EUSPA reserves the right to change the scope, and timeline of the procedure.

Express your interest 

If you are interested in participating in the testing campaign above, please express your interest by sending an email before 25/02/2022, 17:00 (Prague local time) to the following email address: market@euspa.europa.eu. The subject of the email shall be “INAV improvements implementation testing campaign”.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The present European GNSS (Galileo) Open Service Signal-In-Space Interface Control Document (OS SIS ICD) Issue 2.0 contains the publicly available information on the Galileo Signal-In-Space.

The European GNSS Service Centre is getting ready for next-gen Galileo services

4.2.2022 11:12  
Participants will also have the opportunity to learn more about the mission of the GSC, the procurement documentation and the submission process.
Published: 
04 February 2022

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) publishes a procurement on the “Evolution of the European GNSS Service Centre (E-GSC) Infrastructure”. To encourage the widest participation possible, the Agency is organizing an industry day to present the details of the call on 15 February 2022 at 10.00.

A key link between Galileo and its users is the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC). Located in a fully secured environment outside Madrid, the GSC is at the heart of Galileo´s service provision. The centre serves as a single interface between Galileo and the users of the Galileo Open Service (OS), that is also contributing to the Galileo Search and Rescue Service. In the future, it will play a key role for Galileo´s differentiators such as the Galileo High Accuracy Service and the OS Navigation Message Authentication Service. As an integral part of EUSPA, the GSC is a centre of expertise, knowledge sharing, data and information dissemination. 

With this important procurement, EUSPA is looking for a partner to provide services and supplies to support the Agency in shaping the future versions of the E-GSC infrastructure to enable the evolutions of several E-GNSS services. EUSPA is committed to promoting the widest participation possible by economic operators, including new entrants, in particular start-ups and SMEs. To do so, the agency is organizing an industry day on 15 February 2022 at 10.00 am to present the details of the procurement on “Evolution of the European GNSS Service Centre (E-GSC) Infrastructure”. 

Participants will also have the opportunity to learn more about the mission of the GSC, the procurement documentation and the submission process.

To attend the event, please register here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Participants will also have the opportunity to learn more about the mission of the GSC, the procurement documentation and the submission process.

Galileo SAR delivers the best performance since declared operational in December 2016

3.2.2022 10:46  
Actual footage from an Arctic Mass Rescue Operation organised by Norwegian authorities, just a few km off Svalbard. A Galileo-enabled EPIRB compatible with the Return Link Service was used.
Published: 
03 February 2022

The Galileo SAR, reached new heights with a record-breaking location accuracy performance of 98.12% below 2km. The EU constellation is the biggest contributor to the Cospas-Sarsat MEOSAR system. 

The Galileo Search and Rescue Service (SAR) was launched on 15 December 2016 to provide aid to people in distress or imminent danger. The Galileo SAR service relays highly accurate, timely, and reliable distress alert data to Cospas-Sarsat. 

Under EUSPA management, the Galileo SAR Service has been introducing breakthrough features such as the Galileo Return Link Service which was declared operational in January 2020. Since then, the service has been going from strength to strength, consistently exceeding the minimum performance levels committed in the SAR/Galileo Service Definition Document.

Similarly, the SAR Galileo Forward Link Service (FLS) has seen the addition of new elements such as the SAR/Galileo calibration beacons as well as continuous upgrades of its ground infrastructure that are significantly contributing to excellent operability, performance and therefore overall SAR Galileo Service delivery.

Unprecedented levels of location accuracy for Galileo

The EU Agency for the Space Programme is committed to delivering top-notch satellite services which is why the dedicated Galileo team performs continuous quantitative controls to monitor key performance parameters (KPI) of the Galileo SAR service. 

One of the most relevant performance parameters gauged is the "quality of the location service" or location accuracy. The said KPI measures the probability of success in locating any emergency distress with an error better than 2km and 10minutes within the declared SAR/Galileo Coverage Area. Thanks to a streamlined Galileo SAR service delivery and a robust infrastructure, the SAR/Galileo achieved an average location accuracy within a 2km value of 98.12% during December 2021, the best location accuracy performance since the start of the operations (see graph below).


Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Actual footage from an Arctic Mass Rescue Operation organised by Norwegian authorities, just a few km off Svalbard. A Galileo-enabled EPIRB compatible with the Return Link Service was used.

Galileo SAR delivers the best performance since declared operational in December 2016

3.2.2022 10:46  
Actual footage from an Arctic Mass Rescue Operation organised by Norwegian authorities, just a few km off Svalbard. A Galileo-enabled EPIRB compatible with the Return Link Service was used.
Published: 
03 February 2022

The Galileo SAR, reached new heights with a record-breaking location accuracy performance of 98.12% below 2km. The EU constellation is the biggest contributor to the Cospas-Sarsat MEOSAR system. 

The Galileo Search and Rescue Service (SAR) was launched on 15 December 2016 to provide aid to people in distress or imminent danger. The Galileo SAR service relays highly accurate, timely, and reliable distress alert data to Cospas-Sarsat. 

Under EUSPA management, the Galileo SAR Service has been introducing breakthrough features such as the Galileo Return Link Service which was declared operational in January 2020. Since then, the service has been going from strength to strength, consistently exceeding the minimum performance levels committed in the SAR/Galileo Service Definition Document.

Similarly, the SAR Galileo Forward Link Service (FLS) has seen the addition of new elements such as the SAR/Galileo calibration beacons as well as continuous upgrades of its ground infrastructure that are significantly contributing to excellent operability, performance and therefore overall SAR Galileo Service delivery.

Unprecedented levels of location accuracy for Galileo

The EU Agency for the Space Programme is committed to delivering top-notch satellite services which is why the dedicated Galileo team performs continuous quantitative controls to monitor key performance parameters (KPI) of the Galileo SAR service. 

One of the most relevant performance parameters gauged is the "quality of the location service" or location accuracy. The said KPI measures the probability of success in locating any emergency distress with an error better than 2km and 10minutes within the declared SAR/Galileo Coverage Area. Thanks to a streamlined Galileo SAR service delivery and a robust infrastructure, the SAR/Galileo achieved an average location accuracy within a 2km value of 98.12% during December 2021, the best location accuracy performance since the start of the operations (see graph below).


 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Actual footage from an Arctic Mass Rescue Operation organised by Norwegian authorities, just a few km off Svalbard. A Galileo-enabled EPIRB compatible with the Return Link Service was used.

Galileo SAR delivers the best performance since declared operational in December 2016

3.2.2022 10:46  
Actual footage from an Arctic Mass Rescue Operation organised by Norwegian authorities, just a few km off Svalbard. A Galileo-enabled EPIRB compatible with the Return Link Service was used.
Published: 
03 February 2022

The Galileo SAR, reached new heights with a record-breaking location accuracy performance of 98.12% below 2km. The EU constellation is the biggest contributor to the Cospas-Sarsat MEOSAR system. 

The Galileo Search and Rescue Service (SAR) was launched on 15 December 2016 to provide aid to people in distress or imminent danger. The Galileo SAR service relays highly accurate, timely, and reliable distress alert data to Cospas-Sarsat. 

Under EUSPA management, the Galileo SAR Service has been introducing breakthrough features such as the Galileo Return Link Service which was declared operational in January 2020. Since then, the service has been going from strength to strength, consistently exceeding the minimum performance levels committed in the SAR/Galileo Service Definition Document.

Similarly, the SAR Galileo Forward Link Service (FLS) has seen the addition of new elements such as the SAR/Galileo calibration beacons as well as continuous upgrades of its ground infrastructure that are significantly contributing to excellent operability, performance and therefore overall SAR Galileo Service delivery.

Unprecedented levels of location accuracy for Galileo

The EU Agency for the Space Programme is committed to delivering top-notch satellite services which is why the dedicated Galileo team performs continuous quantitative controls to monitor key performance parameters (KPI) of the Galileo SAR service. 

One of the most relevant performance parameters gauged is the "quality of the location service" or location accuracy. The said KPI measures the probability of success in locating any emergency distress with an error better than 2km and 10minutes within the declared SAR/Galileo Coverage Area. Thanks to a streamlined Galileo SAR service delivery and a robust infrastructure, the SAR/Galileo achieved an average location accuracy within a 2km value of 98.12% during December 2021, the best location accuracy performance since the start of the operations (see graph below).


 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Actual footage from an Arctic Mass Rescue Operation organised by Norwegian authorities, just a few km off Svalbard. A Galileo-enabled EPIRB compatible with the Return Link Service was used.

Galileo SAR delivers best performance since declared operational in December 2016

3.2.2022 10:46  
Actual footage from an Arctic Mass Rescue Operation organised by Norwegian authorities, just a few km off Svalbard. A Galileo-enabled EPIRB compatible with the Return Link Service was used.
Published: 
03 February 2022

The Galileo SAR, reached new heights with a record-breaking location accuracy performance of 98.12% below 2km. The EU constellation is the biggest contributor to the Cospas-Sarsat MEOSAR system. 

The Galileo Search and Rescue Service (SAR) was launched on 15 December 2016 to provide aid to people in distress or imminent danger. The Galileo SAR service relays highly accurate, timely, and reliable distress alert data to Cospas-Sarsat. 

Under EUSPA management, the Galileo SAR Service has been introducing breakthrough features such as the Galileo Return Link Service which was declared operational in January 2020. Since then, the service has been going from strength to strength, consistently exceeding the minimum performance levels committed in the SAR/Galileo Service Definition Document.

Similarly, the SAR Galileo Forward Link Service (FLS) has seen the addition of new elements such as the SAR/Galileo calibration beacons as well as continuous upgrades of its ground infrastructure that are significantly contributing to excellent operability, performance and therefore overall SAR Galileo Service delivery.

Unprecedented levels of location accuracy for Galileo

The EU Agency for the Space Programme is committed to delivering top-notch satellite services which is why the dedicated Galileo team performs continuous quantitative controls to monitor key performance parameters (KPI) of the Galileo SAR service. 

One of the most relevant performance parameters gauged is the "quality of the location service" or location accuracy. The said KPI measures the probability of success in locating any emergency distress with an error better than 2km and 10minutes within the declared SAR/Galileo Coverage Area. Thanks to a streamlined Galileo SAR service delivery and a robust infrastructure, the SAR/Galileo achieved an average location accuracy within a 2km value of 98.12% during December 2021, the best location accuracy performance since the start of the operations (see graph below).


 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Actual footage from an Arctic Mass Rescue Operation organised by Norwegian authorities, just a few km off Svalbard. A Galileo-enabled EPIRB compatible with the Return Link Service was used.

Galileo SAR delivers best performance since declared operational in December 2016

3.2.2022 10:46  
Actual footage from an Arctic Mass Rescue Operation organised by Norwegian authorities, just a few km off Svalbard. A Galileo-enabled EPIRB compatible with the Return Link Service was used.
Published: 
03 February 2022

The Galileo SAR reached new heights with a record-breaking location accuracy performance of 98.12% below 2km. The EU constellation is the biggest contributor to the Cospas-Sarsat MEOSAR system. 

The Galileo Search and Rescue Service (SAR) was launched on 15 December 2016 to provide aid to people in distress or imminent danger. The Galileo SAR service relays highly accurate, timely, and reliable distress alert data to Cospas-Sarsat. 

Under EUSPA management, the Galileo SAR Service has been introducing breakthrough features such as the Galileo Return Link Service which was declared operational in January 2020. Since then, the service has been going from strength to strength, consistently exceeding the minimum performance levels committed in the SAR/Galileo Service Definition Document.

Similarly, the SAR Galileo Forward Link Service (FLS) has seen the addition of new elements such as the SAR/Galileo calibration beacons as well as continuous upgrades of its ground infrastructure that are significantly contributing to excellent operability, performance and therefore overall SAR Galileo Service delivery.

Unprecedented levels of location accuracy for Galileo

The EU Agency for the Space Programme is committed to delivering top-notch satellite services which is why the dedicated Galileo team performs continuous quantitative controls to monitor key performance parameters (KPI) of the Galileo SAR service. 

One of the most relevant performance parameters gauged is the "quality of the location service" or location accuracy. The said KPI measures the probability of success in locating any emergency distress with an error better than 2km and 10minutes within the declared SAR/Galileo Coverage Area. Thanks to a streamlined Galileo SAR service delivery and a robust infrastructure, the SAR/Galileo achieved an average location accuracy within a 2km value of 98.12% during December 2021, the best location accuracy performance since the start of the operations (see graph below).


 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Actual footage from an Arctic Mass Rescue Operation organised by Norwegian authorities, just a few km off Svalbard. A Galileo-enabled EPIRB compatible with the Return Link Service was used.

The EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report is out! Did you get your copy?

26.1.2022 13:20  
EUSPA just published new Market Report on Earth Observation and Satellite Navigation
Published: 
26 January 2022

To help you better appreciate and reap the full benefits of space technology, EUSPA experts compiled the "EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report".  The 216-page long release is the ultimate guide to anyone who seeks to make the EU Space technologies part of their business plan, develop new space downstream applications and see a tangible return on investment.

More than ever society relies on innovative solutions to deal with the big data paradigm, respond to and mitigate climate change, natural and man-made disasters, curb the spread of diseases and strengthen a global supply chain that underpins our daily lives. Earth Observation (EO) and Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) data is becoming increasingly important to these innovative solutions through dozens of applications that are emerging or already in use by citizens, businesses, governments, industry, international organizations, NGOs, and researchers around the world. In 2021, GNSS and EO downstream market generated over 200 billion euros revenues and are set to reach almost half a trillion over the next decade.

The report provides analytical information on the dynamic GNSS and EO markets. It also offers in-depth analyses of the latest global trends and developments through illustrated examples and use cases. Using advanced econometric models, it also offers market evolution forecasts of GNSS shipments or EO revenues spanning to 2031.

Who is it for?

Practically, the report is useful to anyone who seeks to include GNSS or EO data in their operations to bring added value to their business. It is meant for businesses, entrepreneurs, innovators, academia, chipset manufacturers, researchers, and more. If you are looking to break through into the space downstream industry, this report is the ultimate guide, offering great insights on market trends as well as future forecasts.

Eyes on Sustainability 

Accelerating Europe’s engagement in space is pivotal to enable our green transition and reach climate neutrality by 2050. EUSPA is committed to helping the Union deliver on the Green Deal agenda, and the fight against climate change starting with embedding space data and services into our professional activities.

The report emphasises how the user of EO & GNSS contribute to compliance, monitoring, and efficiency of green investments, benefitting companies, regulators, and society as a whole.  It focuses on concrete examples across the 17 identified market segments. For instance, in the area of green energy, EU Space plays a role too! Copernicus helps optimize the performance of tidal power generators, by offering data on the rise and fall tides through tidal currents prediction systems. Galileo can provide smart power grids with robust timing and synchronization down to a nanosecond level and therefore improve their performance. 

Key Report findings:

  • Global GNSS and EO enabled revenues crossed 200 billion in 2021 set to reach almost 500 billion over the next decade; 
  • The global installed base of GNSS devices in use will reach more than 10 bn units in 2031; 
  • The market for Earth Observation applications is boosted by a large pool of value-added services (i.e. 85% of global revenue);
  • The European EO industry is dominated by SMEs and start-ups, from a supply perspective, European companies hold over 41% of the global EO market. 
  • The downstream space application market accompanied by the EU Space Programme will continue growing and thereby effectively contributing to European (e.g. European Green Deal, EU's Digital Decade), as well as Global policies (e.g. United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals and the Paris Agreement) in combination with other technologies. 

You can download the 2022 Market Report here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).
EUSPA just published new Market Report on Earth Observation and Satellite Navigation

The EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report is out! Did you get your copy?

26.1.2022 13:20  
EUSPA just published new Market Report on Earth Observation and Satellite Navigation
Published: 
26 January 2022

To help you better appreciate and reap the full benefits of space technology, EUSPA experts compiled the "EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report".  The 216-page long release is the ultimate guide to anyone who seeks to make the EU Space technologies part of their business plan, develop new space downstream applications and see a tangible return on investment.

More than ever society relies on innovative solutions to deal with the big data paradigm, respond to and mitigate climate change, natural and man-made disasters, curb the spread of diseases and strengthen a global supply chain that underpins our daily lives. Earth Observation (EO) and Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) data is becoming increasingly important to these innovative solutions through dozens of applications that are emerging or already in use by citizens, businesses, governments, industry, international organizations, NGOs, and researchers around the world. In 2021, GNSS and EO downstream market generated over 200 billion euros revenues and are set to reach almost half a trillion over the next decade.

The report provides analytical information on the dynamic GNSS and EO markets. It also offers in-depth analyses of the latest global trends and developments through illustrated examples and use cases. Using advanced econometric models, it also offers market evolution forecasts of GNSS shipments or EO revenues spanning to 2031.

Who is it for?

Practically, the report is useful to anyone who seeks to include GNSS or EO data in their operations to bring added value to their business. It is meant for businesses, entrepreneurs, innovators, academia, chipset manufacturers, researchers, and more. If you are looking to break through into the space downstream industry, this report is the ultimate guide, offering great insights on market trends as well as future forecasts.

Eyes on Sustainability 

Accelerating Europe’s engagement in space is pivotal to enable our green transition and reach climate neutrality by 2050. EUSPA is committed to helping the Union deliver on the Green Deal agenda, and the fight against climate change starting with embedding space data and services into our professional activities.

The report emphasises how the user of EO & GNSS contribute to compliance, monitoring, and efficiency of green investments, benefitting companies, regulators, and society as a whole.  It focuses on concrete examples across the 17 identified market segments. For instance, in the area of green energy, EU Space plays a role too! Copernicus helps optimize the performance of tidal power generators, by offering data on the rise and fall tides through tidal currents prediction systems. Galileo can provide smart power grids with robust timing and synchronization down to a nanosecond level and therefore improve their performance. 

Key Report findings:

  • Global GNSS and EO enabled revenues crossed 200 billion in 2021 set to reach almost 500 billion over the next decade; 
  • The global installed base of GNSS devices in use will reach more than 10 bn units in 2031; 
  • The market for Earth Observation applications is boosted by a large pool of value-added services (i.e. 85% of global revenue);
  • The European EO industry is dominated by SMEs and start-ups, from a supply perspective, European companies hold over 41% of the global EO market. 
  • The downstream space application market accompanied by the EU Space Programme will continue growing and thereby effectively contributing to European (e.g. European Green Deal, EU's Digital Decade), as well as Global policies (e.g. United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals and the Paris Agreement) in combination with other technologies. 

You can download the 2022 Market Report here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).
EUSPA just published new Market Report on Earth Observation and Satellite Navigation

The EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report is out! Did you get your copy?

26.1.2022 13:20  
EUSPA just published new Market Report on Earth Observation and Satellite Navigation
Published: 
26 January 2022

To help you better appreciate and reap the full benefits of space technology, EUSPA experts compiled the "EUSPA EO and GNSS Market Report".  The 216-page long release is the ultimate guide to anyone who seeks to make the EU Space technologies part of their business plan, develop new space downstream applications and see a tangible return on investment.

More than ever society relies on innovative solutions to deal with the big data paradigm, respond to and mitigate climate change, natural and man-made disasters, curb the spread of diseases and strengthen a global supply chain that underpins our daily lives. Earth Observation (EO) and Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) data is becoming increasingly important to these innovative solutions through dozens of applications that are emerging or already in use by citizens, businesses, governments, industry, international organizations, NGOs, and researchers around the world. In 2021, GNSS and EO downstream market generated over 200 billion euros revenues and are set to reach almost half a trillion over the next decade.

The report provides analytical information on the dynamic GNSS and EO markets. It also offers in-depth analyses of the latest global trends and developments through illustrated examples and use cases. Using advanced econometric models, it also offers market evolution forecasts of GNSS shipments or EO revenues spanning to 2031.

Who is it for?

Practically, the report is useful to anyone who seeks to include GNSS or EO data in their operations to bring added value to their business. It is meant for businesses, entrepreneurs, innovators, academia, chipset manufacturers, researchers, and more. If you are looking to break through into the space downstream industry, this report is the ultimate guide, offering great insights on market trends as well as future forecasts.

Eyes on Sustainability 

Accelerating Europe’s engagement in space is pivotal to enable our green transition and reach climate neutrality by 2050. EUSPA is committed to helping the Union deliver on the Green Deal agenda, and the fight against climate change starting with embedding space data and services into our professional activities.

The report emphasises how the user of EO & GNSS contribute to compliance, monitoring, and efficiency of green investments, benefitting companies, regulators, and society as a whole.  It focuses on concrete examples across the 17 identified market segments. For instance, in the area of green energy, EU Space plays a role too! Copernicus helps optimize the performance of tidal power generators, by offering data on the rise and fall tides through tidal currents prediction systems. Galileo can provide smart power grids with robust timing and synchronization down to a nanosecond level and therefore improve their performance. 

Key Report findings:

  • Global GNSS and EO enabled revenues crossed 200 billion in 2021 set to reach almost 500 billion over the next decade; 
  • The global installed base of GNSS devices in use will reach more than 10 bn units in 2031; 
  • The market for Earth Observation applications is boosted by a large pool of value-added services (i.e. 85% of global revenue);
  • The European EO industry is dominated by SMEs and start-ups, from a supply perspective, European companies hold over 41% of the global EO market. 
  • The downstream space application market accompanied by the EU Space Programme will continue growing and thereby effectively contributing to European (e.g. European Green Deal, EU's Digital Decade), as well as Global policies (e.g. United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals and the Paris Agreement) in combination with other technologies. 

You can download the 2022 Market Report here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).
EUSPA just published new Market Report on Earth Observation and Satellite Navigation

EUSPA to further boost space investments with CASSINI

25.1.2022 14:44  
Josef Aschbacher, Timo Pesonen, Rodrigo da Costa, Alain Godard
Published: 
25 January 2022

The European Commission, the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), the European Space Agency (ESA), and the European Investment Fund (EIF) committed to multiplying the benefits of space technology to businesses. This initiative implies attracting more private investment funds, running capacity building activities, sharing expertise, organizing matchmaking, and promoting the markets. CASSINI is central to this endeavour.

DG DEFIS Director-General Timo Pesonen, EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa, ESA Director-General Josef Aschbacher, Chief Executive of the European Investment Fund Alain Godard gathered at the Egmont Palace in Brussels on the occasion of the 14th edition of the European Space Conference 2022. During this event, they agreed on the principles of cooperation to support SMEs in the space sector, fostering on exchange of information and engaging in joint cross-functional actions towards space entrepreneurship. 

Dedicated to promoting the commercialization of Galileo, EGNOS, and Copernicus data and services to increase the market share of the EU space actors, EUSPA has been engaging with companies of all sizes from a broad spectrum of industries, many of which had not used space services in their activities before. 

Through capacity-building, and supporting their access to financial resources, mentoring and market know-how, EUSPA helps to create breakthroughs for space entrepreneurship. 

Read this: The clock is ticking! Have you submitted your Horizon Europe proposal?

The ‘’New Space’’ paradigm is however reshaping the industry’s landscape resulting in a greater need for better access to risk capital and other forms of growth financing. Anticipating this need, EUSPA is ready to take EU space entrepreneurship to the next level by leveraging investments, its know-how and capacity building within CASSINI Space Entrepreneurship Growth Funding Initiative, together with European Investment Fund, the European Commission, and the European Space Agency.   

Read this: CASSINI hackathon leverages space to digitise green spaces

These organisations are committed to bringing together their expertise and experience to leverage new investment support for the European space-based economy. The common objective is to create high-skilled jobs in the EU and improve the day-to-day lives of Europeans by supporting innovative companies and accelerating the development of new applications that use European global navigation satellite systems and earth observation services.

‘’EUSPA has a long history of cooperation with the European Investment Bank group and other private and public investors. I am pleased to see that today we reinforce our collaboration to support developing innovative, creative, and successful companies using EU space technologies,’’ said EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa. ‘’It is another step to contribute to the growth of the EU Space industry and its market share to boost our common economy in this very competitive global environment,’’ he concluded.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Josef Aschbacher, Timo Pesonen, Rodrigo da Costa, Alain Godard

EUSPA to further boost space investments with CASSINI

25.1.2022 14:44  
Josef Aschbacher, Timo Pesonen, Rodrigo da Costa, Alain Godard
Published: 
25 January 2022

The European Commission, the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA), the European Space Agency (ESA), and the European Investment Fund (EIF) committed to multiplying the benefits of space technology to businesses. This initiative implies attracting more private investment funds, running capacity building activities, sharing expertise, organizing matchmaking, and promoting the markets. CASSINI is central to this endeavour.

DG DEFIS Director-General Timo Pesonen, EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa, ESA Director-General Josef Aschbacher, Chief Executive of the European Investment Fund Alain Godard gathered at the Egmont Palace in Brussels on the occasion of the 14th edition of the European Space Conference 2022. During this event, they agreed on the principles of cooperation to support SMEs in the space sector, fostering on exchange of information and engaging in joint cross-functional actions towards space entrepreneurship. 

Dedicated to promoting the commercialization of Galileo, EGNOS, and Copernicus data and services to increase the market share of the EU space actors, EUSPA has been engaging with companies of all sizes from a broad spectrum of industries, many of which had not used space services in their activities before. 

Through capacity-building, and supporting their access to financial resources, mentoring and market know-how, EUSPA helps to create breakthroughs for space entrepreneurship. 

Read this: The clock is ticking! Have you submitted your Horizon Europe proposal?

The ‘’New Space’’ paradigm is however reshaping the industry’s landscape resulting in a greater need for better access to risk capital and other forms of growth financing. Anticipating this need, EUSPA is ready to take EU space entrepreneurship to the next level by leveraging investments, its know-how and capacity building within CASSINI Space Entrepreneurship Growth Funding Initiative, together with European Investment Fund, the European Commission, and the European Space Agency.   

Read this: CASSINI hackathon leverages space to digitise green spaces

These organisations are committed to bringing together their expertise and experience to leverage new investment support for the European space-based economy. The common objective is to create high-skilled jobs in the EU and improve the day-to-day lives of Europeans by supporting innovative companies and accelerating the development of new applications that use European global navigation satellite systems and earth observation services.

‘’EUSPA has a long history of cooperation with the European Investment Bank group and other private and public investors. I am pleased to see that today we reinforce our collaboration to support developing innovative, creative, and successful companies using EU space technologies,’’ said EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa. ‘’It is another step to contribute to the growth of the EU Space industry and its market share to boost our common economy in this very competitive global environment,’’ he concluded.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Josef Aschbacher, Timo Pesonen, Rodrigo da Costa, Alain Godard

Galileo satellites 27-28 reach final orbit; initiate testing phase

24.1.2022 10:59  
The Galileo satellites orbit Earth at an altitude of 23,222 km
Published: 
24 January 2022

The Payload In Orbit Testing activities is the last stage of the Early Operations Phase. It will enable the Galileo satellites 27-28 to enter service provision and their signals to become available to end-users down on Earth.

2022 is the year of delivery for EUSPA and the EU Space Programme.

Launched earlier in December from the European Spaceport in French Guyana, the Galileo satellites reached, on 22 January 21, their orbital position at 23.222 km above the Earth after completing the drift stop and fine-positioning maneuvers. 

Earlier today, Payload in Orbit Testing activities began for satellite 27 to be followed by satellite 28 the next day. This last stage of the Early Operation Phase allows to test the health of the Galileo signals and therefore ensure the entry into service provision the following months. During the next month, the clocks onboard the two satellites will be tested and their signal analyzed to ensure that they are ready to be included in the Galileo constellation and contribute to the most accurate navigation service in the world. 

The addition of the latest batch of Galileo satellites allows for enhanced accuracy and robustness in navigation services and a better experience for the end-users. It is also another step towards the declarations of Open Service Full Operational Capability by the end of 2022 and of Public Regulated Service Initial Operational Capability by the end of 2023.

The next batch of Galileo satellites 29-30 is scheduled for launch at the beginning of the second quarter of 2022.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The Galileo satellites orbit Earth at an altitude of 23,222 km

Galileo satellites 27-28 reach final orbit; initiate testing phase

24.1.2022 10:59  
The Galileo satellites orbit Earth at an altitude of 23,222 km
Published: 
24 January 2022

The Payload In Orbit Testing activities is the last stage of the Early Operations Phase. It will enable the Galileo satellites 27-28 to enter service provision and their signals to become available to end-users down on Earth.

2022 is the year of delivery for EUSPA and the EU Space Programme.

Launched earlier in December from the European Spaceport in French Guyana, the Galileo satellites reached, on 21 January 2022, their orbital position at 23.222 km above the Earth after completing the drift stop and fine-positioning maneuvers. 

Earlier today, Payload in Orbit Testing activities began for satellite 27 to be followed by satellite 28 the next day. This last stage of the Early Operation Phase allows to test the health of the Galileo signals and therefore ensure the entry into service provision the following months. During the next month, the clocks onboard the two satellites will be tested and their signal analyzed to ensure that they are ready to be included in the Galileo constellation and contribute to the most accurate navigation service in the world. 

The addition of the latest batch of Galileo satellites allows for enhanced accuracy and robustness in navigation services and a better experience for the end-users. It is also another step towards the declarations of Open Service Full Operational Capability by the end of 2022 and of Public Regulated Service Initial Operational Capability by the end of 2023.

The next batch of Galileo satellites 29-30 is scheduled for launch at the beginning of the second quarter of 2022.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The Galileo satellites orbit Earth at an altitude of 23,222 km

Galileo OSNMA Webinar: All you need to know about the Public Observation Test phase

21.1.2022 10:38  
The new pioneering service of Galileo will pave the way towards robust Position, Velocity and Time information (PVT) for the Galileo Open Service users.
Published: 
21 January 2022

The EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is hosting a webinar on the Public Observation Test Phase of Galileo OSNMA. Scheduled for 2 February 2022, this digital gathering will offer receiver manufacturers and application developers a comprehensive overview of the new Galileo differentiator and insights in the ongoing test phase.

Intentional satellite interference is not a new issue. Lately, however, the GNSS industry has been facing more and more incidents of jamming and spoofing, driven mainly by the growing awareness and the availability of low-cost, illegal disruption equipment. GNSS signal falsification can have disastrous impacts on applications and market sectors that rely on precise and reliable position, navigation, and timing information. The global economy could suffer tremendous losses in case of GNSS outage caused by various attacks, including spoofing.

To contribute to the detection of certain types of data-level GNSS attacks, EUSPA and the European Commission are currently testing the Galileo Open Service – Navigation Message Authentication (OSNMA). The OSNMA is a new, breakthrough feature of Europe’s positioning system which meets a clear user need: the provision of a more robust and trustworthy GNSS benefitting a broad range of applications. This forthcoming service is an authentication mechanism that allows Open Service users to verify the authenticity of its Navigation Message, making sure that the data the users receive is indeed from Galileo and has not been modified in any way.

Read this: GALILEO OPEN SERVICE NAVIGATION MESSAGE AUTHENTICATION (OSNMA) Info Note now available for download

To acquaint interested receiver manufacturers and application developers with the Galileo OSNMA functionalities, EUSPA is hosting a webinar on the upcoming Public Observation Test Phase of the Galileo OSNMA on 02 February 2022. EUSPA experts will provide an overview of the OSNMA service roadmap and receiver guidelines, present concrete use cases where the service can make a difference, explain how to join the Public Observation Test phase, and share your feedback.

By participating in the test phase, you will be able to:

  • test the performance of the new service in their solutions.
  • get hands-on experience on a long-awaited feature of Galileo and GNSS as a whole
  • Be part of a one-of-a-kind user community and gain exclusive insights from experts on the market
  • Give your OSNMA-enabled solution extra visibility.  
  • Have the chance to steer the service towards targeted enhancements

To find out more about the test phase register for the webinar here.

Please note that the OSNMA public observation phase is targeting receiver and device manufacturers. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The new pioneering service of Galileo will pave the way towards robust Position, Velocity and Time information (PVT) for the Galileo Open Service users.

The clock is ticking! Have you submitted your Horizon Europe proposal?

18.1.2022 9:54  
Synergies between Copernicus and Galileo support applications and the delivery of critical services when natural disasters strike such as volcano eruptions.
Published: 
18 January 2022

The deadline for the first EU Space-flavoured Horizon Europe Call is approaching. Don’t forget to submit by 16 February 2022 at 17:00:00 Brussels time!

   The EU Space downstream sector has been experiencing a large growth over the last years as space data is becoming increasingly available to end-users. Businesses turn into geospatial data from Copernicus or GNSS data from Galileo and EGNOS to optimize their operations, generate added value, and increase their return on investment. To facilitate access to EU Space data and services and create new downstream applications, in November 2021, the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) launched its first Horizon Europe call.  

This financial instrument of 32.6 million EUR is fully aligned with the EU priorities and leverages #EUspace to transform the digital economy, increase the Union’s resilience and support the Green Deal. The EUSPA-backed call stretches into three different areas:

EGNSS and Copernicus applications fostering the European Green deal

The EU Space Programme is the opportunity to create synergies between the space components and services to fuel the EU Green Deal. European industry, entrepreneurs, and user communities can rely on EGNSS and Copernicus to develop smart solutions and serve new markets, fully aligned with the EU sustainability goals. Check out here all you need to know about this area of the call.

EGNSS applications for Safety and Crisis management 

When an emergency or a disaster hits a city or region, the priorities are to care for the wounded, restore infrastructure, provide logistics and basic services, and then restore livelihoods and reconstruct communities. European GNSS – Galileo and EGNOS – supports applications and the delivery of critical services during the four key phases of the disaster management life cycle: preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation. Click here for more call details

EGNSS applications for the Digital Age 

This area aims at accelerating the adoption of Galileo and EGNOS in mass and professional markets and rolling out applications with innovative features such as better multipath resistance, authentication, and more. Applications addressing this topic should maximise public benefits by supporting the development of solutions that will address pressing societal challenges in areas such as health, citizen safety and security, mobility, and the sharing economy. Hit the button and make EU Space part of your digital solution.

Being a market-oriented, operational EU Agency, EUSPA is looking for proposals that put the users' needs at the top. Applicants should demonstrate user engagement in all three topics and include a comprehensive business plan.  

About Horizon Europe

Horizon Europe is the EU’s key funding mechanism that facilitates collaboration and strengthens the impact of research and innovation in developing, supporting, and implementing EU policies while tackling global challenges. Staying true to its mission, linking space to user needs, EUSPA will leverage this instrument to stimulate the EU Space Programme operational research and foster the creation of commercial value-adding solutions that contribute to EU policies and priorities. Read more 

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Synergies between Copernicus and Galileo support applications and the delivery of critical services when natural disasters strike such as volcano eruptions.

The clock is ticking! Have you submitted your Horizon Europe proposal?

18.1.2022 9:54  
Synergies between Copernicus and Galileo support applications and the delivery of critical services when natural disasters strike such as volcano eruptions.
Published: 
18 January 2022

The deadline for the first EU Space-flavoured Horizon Europe Call is approaching. Don’t forget to submit by 16 February 2022 at 17:00:00 Brussels time!

 The EU Space downstream sector has been experiencing a large growth over the last years as space data is becoming increasingly available to end-users. Businesses turn into geospatial data from Copernicus or GNSS data from Galileo and EGNOS to optimize their operations, generate added value, and increase their return on investment. To facilitate access to EU Space data and services and create new downstream applications, in November 2021, the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) launched its first Horizon Europe call.  

This financial instrument of 32.6 million EUR is fully aligned with the EU priorities and leverages #EUspace to transform the digital economy, increase the Union’s resilience and support the Green Deal. The EUSPA-backed call stretches into three different areas:

EGNSS and Copernicus applications fostering the European Green deal

The EU Space Programme is the opportunity to create synergies between the space components and services to fuel the EU Green Deal. European industry, entrepreneurs, and user communities can rely on EGNSS and Copernicus to develop smart solutions and serve new markets, fully aligned with the EU sustainability goals. Check out here all you need to know about this area of the call.

EGNSS applications for Safety and Crisis management 

When an emergency or a disaster hits a city or region, the priorities are to care for the wounded, restore infrastructure, provide logistics and basic services, and then restore livelihoods and reconstruct communities. European GNSS – Galileo and EGNOS – supports applications and the delivery of critical services during the four key phases of the disaster management life cycle: preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation. Click here for more call details

EGNSS applications for the Digital Age 

This area aims at accelerating the adoption of Galileo and EGNOS in mass and professional markets and rolling out applications with innovative features such as better multipath resistance, authentication, and more. Applications addressing this topic should maximise public benefits by supporting the development of solutions that will address pressing societal challenges in areas such as health, citizen safety and security, mobility, and the sharing economy. Hit the button and make EU Space part of your digital solution.

Being a market-oriented, operational EU Agency, EUSPA is looking for proposals that put the users' needs at the top. Applicants should demonstrate user engagement in all three topics and include a comprehensive business plan.  

About Horizon Europe

Horizon Europe is the EU’s key funding mechanism that facilitates collaboration and strengthens the impact of research and innovation in developing, supporting, and implementing EU policies while tackling global challenges. Staying true to its mission, linking space to user needs, EUSPA will leverage this instrument to stimulate the EU Space Programme operational research and foster the creation of commercial value-adding solutions that contribute to EU policies and priorities. Read more 

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Synergies between Copernicus and Galileo support applications and the delivery of critical services when natural disasters strike such as volcano eruptions.

The clock is ticking! Have you submitted your Horizon Europe proposal?

18.1.2022 9:54  
Synergies between Copernicus and Galileo support applications and the delivery of critical services when natural disasters strike such as volcano eruptions.
Published: 
18 January 2022

The deadline for the first EU Space-flavoured Horizon Europe Call is approaching. Don’t forget to submit by 16 February 2022 at 17:00:00 Brussels time!

The EU Space downstream sector has been experiencing a large growth over the last years as space data is becoming increasingly available to end-users. Businesses turn into geospatial data from Copernicus or GNSS data from Galileo and EGNOS to optimize their operations, generate added value, and increase their return on investment. To facilitate access to EU Space data and services and create new downstream applications, in November 2021, the EU Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) launched its first Horizon Europe call.  

This financial instrument of 32.6 million EUR is fully aligned with the EU priorities and leverages #EUspace to transform the digital economy, increase the Union’s resilience and support the Green Deal. The EUSPA-backed call stretches into three different areas:

EGNSS and Copernicus applications fostering the European Green Deal

The EU Space Programme is the opportunity to create synergies between the space components and services to fuel the EU Green Deal. European industry, entrepreneurs, and user communities can rely on EGNSS and Copernicus to develop smart solutions and serve new markets, fully aligned with the EU sustainability goals. Check out here all you need to know about this area of the call.

EGNSS applications for Safety and Crisis Management 

When an emergency or a disaster hits a city or region, the priorities are to care for the wounded, restore infrastructure, provide logistics and basic services, and then restore livelihoods and reconstruct communities. European GNSS – Galileo and EGNOS – supports applications and the delivery of critical services during the four key phases of the disaster management life cycle: preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation. Click here for more call details

EGNSS applications for the Digital Age 

This area aims at accelerating the adoption of Galileo and EGNOS in mass and professional markets and rolling out applications with innovative features such as better multipath resistance, authentication, and more. Applications addressing this topic should maximise public benefits by supporting the development of solutions that will address pressing societal challenges in areas such as health, citizen safety and security, mobility, and the sharing economy. Hit the button and make EU Space part of your digital solution.

Being a market-oriented, operational EU Agency, EUSPA is looking for proposals that put the users' needs at the top. Applicants should demonstrate user engagement in all three topics and include a comprehensive business plan.  

About Horizon Europe

Horizon Europe is the EU’s key funding mechanism that facilitates collaboration and strengthens the impact of research and innovation in developing, supporting, and implementing EU policies while tackling global challenges. Staying true to its mission, linking space to user needs, EUSPA will leverage this instrument to stimulate the EU Space Programme operational research and foster the creation of commercial value-adding solutions that contribute to EU policies and priorities. Read more 

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

Synergies between Copernicus and Galileo support applications and the delivery of critical services when natural disasters strike such as volcano eruptions.

President of the European Council, Charles Michel, visits EUSPA Prague Headquarters

13.1.2022 17:08  
EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa greets European Council President, Charles Michel.
Published: 
13 January 2022

Topics discussed between EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa and the President of the European Council included the new mandate of the agency and its role in the delivery of EU priorities such as the EU Green Deal and the digitization and growth of the European economy.

During his stay in Prague, President Michel met with EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa, to discuss the Agency’s new role one year after the entry into force of the EU Space Regulation, together with Matthias Petschke, Director of Space at the European Commission and Bruno Vermeire, Chairperson of the EU Space Security Accreditation Board. EUSPA has now extended responsibilities when it comes to the management, service provision, evolution, and protection of the EU’s flagship navigation systems, Galileo and EGNOS, and the development of the GOVSATCOM Hub, while being in charge of the promotion of services and data from the EU Space Programme – now extended also to the further utilization of Copernicus and GOVSATCOM user aspects. As a gatekeeper of space security, the agency’s Security Accreditation Board has the mandate to accredit all components of the EU Space Programme. 

“I am thrilled to see the scope of EUSPA ‘s missions because the EUS Space action is crucial. Indeed, strategic autonomy is essential for the EU, so is the innovation capacity coming from space inspired which is helping for our European priorities. A few years ago, we set the objective of a climate-neutral EU by 2050, which is the driving force of the Green Deal. And I believe that innovation and technology fostered by the EU Space Programme technology are essential to reach our European objectives including mitigating climate change,” declared President Charles MICHEL.

In line with the EU Green Deal, EUSPA supports the creation of solutions that mitigate the adverse effects of climate change and our environmental footprint on a wide range of areas, such as transport and agriculture. Synergies between Earth observation and navigation are central to the preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation of natural disasters. In the unfortunate event of wildfires, floods, or earthquakes access to a precise location and up-to-date geospatial information is vital to deliver an effective disaster management response. EUSPA recently launched a Horizon Europe call to develop space-based safety and crisis management applications.  

 

Fiammetta Diani, Head of EUSPA Market Development, acquainting President Charles Michel, with the features of H2020 funded GEAR project which leverages Galileo’s accurate signals. 

‘’Aside from our commitment to fostering the creation of solutions that make our planet greener, we also focus on innovation and technological progress with the help of our safe and secure Space Programme literally across all markets’’ said EUSPA Executive director Rodrigo da Costa’’. We offer the means to industry and academia, start-ups and SMEs to digitize their operations by relying on space services and data that are secure and accurate’’ da Costa concluded.

The security of safety-critical applications such as landing and navigating a plane,drones delivering medical equipment or ships transporting inflammable cargo trustworthy navigation data is crucial. Among others, EUSPA is currently testing the Galileo Open Service Navigation Message Authentication. A major differentiator for Europe’s positioning system, this service aims to meet a clear user need for a more robust and trustworthy GNSS solution that will bring benefit to a broad range of applications.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa greets European Council President, Charles Michel.

President of the European Council, Charles Michel, visits EUSPA Prague Headquarters

13.1.2022 17:08  
EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa greets European Council President, Charles Michel.
Published: 
13 January 2022

Topics discussed between EUSPA Executive Director Rodrigo da Costa and the President of the European Council included the new mandate of the agency and its role in the delivery of EU priorities such as the EU Green Deal and the digitization and growth of the European economy.

During his stay in Prague, President Michel met with EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa, to discuss the Agency’s new role one year after the entry into force of the EU Space Regulation, together with Matthias Petschke, Director of Space at the European Commission and Bruno Vermeire, Chairperson of the EU Space Security Accreditation Board. EUSPA has now extended responsibilities when it comes to the management, service provision, evolution, and protection of the EU’s flagship navigation systems, Galileo and EGNOS, and the development of the GOVSATCOM Hub, while being in charge of the promotion of services and data from the EU Space Programme – now extended also to the further utilization of Copernicus and GOVSATCOM user aspects. As a gatekeeper of space security, the agency’s Security Accreditation Board has the mandate to accredit all components of the EU Space Programme. 

“I am thrilled to see the scope of EUSPA ‘s missions because the EUS Space action is crucial. Indeed, strategic autonomy is essential for the EU, so is the innovation capacity coming from space inspired which is helping for our European priorities. A few years ago, we set the objective of a climate-neutral EU by 2050, which is the driving force of the Green Deal. And I believe that innovation and technology fostered by the EU Space Programme technology are essential to reach our European objectives including mitigating climate change,” declared President Charles MICHEL.

In line with the EU Green Deal, EUSPA supports the creation of solutions that mitigate the adverse effects of climate change and our environmental footprint on a wide range of areas, such as transport and agriculture. Synergies between Earth observation and navigation are central to the preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation of natural disasters. In the unfortunate event of wildfires, floods, or earthquakes access to a precise location and up-to-date geospatial information is vital to deliver an effective disaster management response. EUSPA recently launched a Horizon Europe call to develop space-based safety and crisis management applications.  

 

Fiammetta Diani, Head of EUSPA Market Development, acquainting President Charles Michel, with the features of Fundamental Elements funded GEAR project which leverages Galileo’s accurate signals. 

‘’Aside from our commitment to fostering the creation of solutions that make our planet greener, we also focus on innovation and technological progress with the help of our safe and secure Space Programme literally across all markets’’ said EUSPA Executive director Rodrigo da Costa’’. We offer the means to industry and academia, start-ups and SMEs to digitize their operations by relying on space services and data that are secure and accurate’’ da Costa concluded.

The security of safety-critical applications such as landing and navigating a plane,drones delivering medical equipment or ships transporting inflammable cargo trustworthy navigation data is crucial. Among others, EUSPA is currently testing the Galileo Open Service Navigation Message Authentication. A major differentiator for Europe’s positioning system, this service aims to meet a clear user need for a more robust and trustworthy GNSS solution that will bring benefit to a broad range of applications.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

EUSPA Executive Director, Rodrigo da Costa greets European Council President, Charles Michel.

French EU Presidency can rely on #EUSpace to support its priorities

7.1.2022 11:36  
The EU Space Programme is pivotal for the development of a renewed European model of growth.
Published: 
07 January 2022

Since 1st January 2022, France holds the reins of the EU Council Presidency. The priorities for the French Presidency involve the EU space activities, underlining the need for a more sovereign and humane Europe, with sustainable economic growth and job opportunities. 

After six months at the helm of the EU, Slovenia passed on the baton of the EU Council Presidency to France, which will preside until June 30th. France begins a new cycle and will work as a trio with the Czech Republic in the second half of 2022 and Sweden in the first half of 2023. During his opening speech at the Palais de l’Elysée on December 9th, 2021, President Macron presented the three axes around which the French Presidency will be spinning for the following six months : European sovereignty, a new European model of growth, and a more human Europe.

The French President outlined the pillars that will support the priorities, and new technologies such as the space technologies are central to their delivery.

EU Space equals sovereignty  

With the launch of the first Galileo satellite in 2011, Europe demonstrated its technological autonomy, but also redefined the international standards for global navigation satellite systems. Galileo offers superior performance and a broad range of value-adding services. Ten years later, cognizant of the strategic importance of space, the Union created its own, fully-fledged space programme to further boost its sovereignty.

Should existing satellite navigation services be disrupted or become less reliable, Europe has its state-of-the-art positioning system to act as a backup. Galileo, currently used by over 2.5 billion users, keeps the European economy up and running but - above all- ensures the safety of its citizens.

Unique features of Galileo, such as the Public Regulated Service (PRS), scheduled for Initial Capability Operations in 2023, will give an extra layer of security to governmental authorised users and sensitive applications that require high continuity.

Satellite navigation services are further enhanced by Copernicus. Data from the Copernicus Sentinel satellites and in situ data collected from ground-based, sea-borne, or air-borne monitoring systems provide precious insights to national governments and EU policymakers on climate change, for instance. Soon, the EU will bridge gaps in satellite communications with GOVSATCOM. The objective of the GOVSATCOM initiative is to ensure the long-term availability of reliable, secured, and cost-effective satellite communication (satcom) services to its users. Paving the way towards a new satcom solution for governmental applications, the initiative will benefit a broad range of EU and national entities in their day-to-day operations, and contribute to the security and safety of all EU citizens.

EU Space for a renewed European model

Space data and services are invisible infrastructures but generate a dearth of tangible benefits to Europeans daily. The EU Space Programme is becoming the basis for the construction of a new EU model of strategic growth that…

…spurs innovation and creates jobs

Over the past years, EUSPA created a vibrant ecosystem of startups and SMEs that rely on EU space technology to add value to their operations. Most companies are now scaling up, attracting new talents across Europe. From Galileo-enabled drones that perform atmospheric analysis to robotic solutions for pest management, EUSPA has been steering EU funds and knowhow to develop space downstream applications.

…digitizes and greens the economy 

Space enables us to rethink the way we produce and consume. The combination of Earth Observation and GNSS data, for example, enables various industries such as agribusiness to operate in an eco-friendlier way. Farmers are able to allocate resources such as water or fertilizers more responsibly thanks to the accurate guidance offered by Galileo and EGNOS and the information on soil fertility from Copernicus. Thanks to the cooperation between the EU Space assets, it is estimated that EU farmers can save up to 20% of pesticides and fertilisers.  

Satellite-based remote sensing from Copernicus is a cost-effective solution that keeps an eye on clean energy infrastructures, offering precious information on their integrity and targeted maintenance. Geospatial data by the EU Earth Observation system are used to enable better planning of these assets by offering greater situational awareness and helping mitigate risks such as vegetation encroachment on power grids and turbines. Moreover, Copernicus can optimize the performance of tidal power generators, by offering data on the rise and fall of tides through tidal currents prediction systems.

…promotes collaboration between the Member States 

A revisited EU model of growth requires robust synergies between various industrial and institutional actors but, above all EU Member States. To harness the power of our space assets knowledge-sharing is pivotal, EUSPA and the European Commission have put in place various initiatives such as Horizon Europe and Fundamental Elements to boost collaboration between EU countries. 

As of now, over 400 events are set to take place as part of the presidency's programme. The first, space-related event is scheduled on February 16 -17, 2022 in Toulouse and EUSPA will be present.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European Union Agency for the Space Programme (EUSPA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the EUSPA website (http://www.euspa.europa.eu).

The EU Space Programme is pivotal for the development of a renewed European model of growth.
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