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Konference Inspirujme se

European GNSS Agency European GNSS Agency

zdroje zpráv:

GSC portal reaches 1000 registered users

19.2.2018 9:41  
Published: 
19 February 2018

On Friday 9 February 2018, the web portal of the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) registered its 1000th user. This is a great achievement for the broader GNSS community and for the European GNSS Programmes (EGNOS and Galileo) in particular.

The GSC web portal entered into service in 2013 and, since then, it has received more than 175,000 visits from over 190 different countries around the globe. Every month over 20 new users register on the portal, bringing the current total to more than 1,000 registrations. The most downloaded document from the website is the Galileo IS OS Service Definition Document (SDD).

Read this: GSC showcased at First Galileo User Assembly

If you are not yet registered on the GSC site, we invite you to register so that, among other things, you will be able to subscribe to the Galileo service notifications (NAGUs) as well as gain access to the Galileo official Helpdesk.

GSC at a glance

Located in Madrid, the European GNSS Service Centre is an integral part of the European GNSS infrastructure. It provides a single interface for the Galileo Open Service (OS) and Commercial Service (CS) user communities and offers specific added-value services beyond the Galileo Signal-In-Space (SIS) transmitted by the operational satellites.

The GSC is conceived as a centre of expertise, knowledge sharing, custom performance assessment, and information dissemination. The GSC serves the user community through its web portal. This one-stop-shop portal provides Galileo users with relevant infor¬mation on the system’s status and easy access to the dedicated Helpdesk. In addition, an automatic alert system notifies registered users about events affecting the Galileo services.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GSC web portal provides a one-stop-shop for Galileo users

3rd Call for EGNOS adoption in aviation, want to be part of it?

16.2.2018 12:08  
Published: 
16 February 2018

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) has published a 3rd call for proposals with a view to awarding grants to promote EGNOS operational implementation in aviation. The goal of this activity is wide-scale implementation of EGNOS-based operations throughout European airports and among European airspace users.

This call is targeting all aviation segments: Commercial, regional, business, general aviation and rotorcraft users interested in EGNOS operational implementation. The objective of the call is to foster the use of EGNOS for navigation and surveillance applications, increase network effect and maximise public benefits.

To achieve the objectives of the call, applicants are expected to conduct one or more of the following activities:

· The design and operational implementation of EGNOS based LPV/LPV 200 approach procedures, PinS, low level IFR routes at different European airports/heliports/routes;

· Design and implementation of other communication, navigation and surveillance applications benefitting from EGNOS for all phases of flight;

· The installation of EGNOS-enabled avionics and granting of airworthiness certification for RNP APCH procedures down to LPV minima, including PinS;

· Development of retrofit and forward-fit solutions including LPV capabilities;

· Development of enablers and other EGNOS based operations such as, but not limited to, simulators, validation tools, training materials, or drones.

 

3rd EGNOS Aviation Call – At a Glance

·        

Deadline for submitting applications: 21 May 2018 – at 18:00 CET

·        

Maximum budget allocated for EU financing under this call: EUR 10,000,000.00

·        

Indicative EU financing amount for each project: EUR 800,000.00

·        

Maximum EU financing rate of eligible costs: 60%

·        

Indicative number of projects: 12

 

GSA is organizing a series of information sessions about the call. The first one will be organised during the ATM World Congress at the FABEC OPS Theatre on 6/03 from 15:15 to 16:15. Interested users are very welcome to join. This session will be held in cooperation with INEA, who will present the open CEF Call 2017. More information is available at: https://www.worldatmcongress.org/fabec-ops-theatre.

 There will be also webinars to explain the call in the coming months. We will publish dates and connection details as soon as dates are defined.

 

 If you are interested in this call for proposals and have a question you would like answered, you can send it to: gnss.grants@gsa.europa.eu. For more detailed information on the call, check here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

3rd Call for EGNOS adoption in aviation is now open

3rd Call for EGNOS adoption in aviation, want to be part of it?

16.2.2018 12:08  
Published: 
16 February 2018

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) has published a 3rd call for proposals with a view to awarding grants to promote EGNOS operational implementation in aviation. The goal of this activity is wide-scale implementation of EGNOS-based operations throughout European airports and among European airspace users.

This call is targeting all aviation segments: Commercial, regional, business, general aviation and rotorcraft users interested in EGNOS operational implementation. The objective of the call is to foster the use of EGNOS for navigation and surveillance applications, increase network effect and maximise public benefits.

To achieve the objectives of the call, applicants are expected to conduct one or more of the following activities:

The design and operational implementation of EGNOS based LPV/LPV 200 approach procedures, PinS, low level IFR routes at different European airports/heliports/routes;

  • Design and implementation of other communication, navigation and surveillance applications benefitting from EGNOS for all phases of flight;
  • The installation of EGNOS-enabled avionics and granting of airworthiness certification for RNP APCH procedures down to LPV minima, including PinS;
  • Development of retrofit and forward-fit solutions including LPV capabilities;
  • Development of enablers and other EGNOS based operations such as, but not limited to, simulators, validation tools, training materials, or drones.

3rd EGNOS Aviation Call – At a Glance

  • Deadline for submitting applications: 21 May 2018 – at 18:00 CET
  • Maximum budget allocated for EU financing under this call: EUR 10,000,000.00
  • Indicative EU financing amount for each project: EUR 800,000.00
  • Maximum EU financing rate of eligible costs: 60%
  • Indicative number of projects: 12

GSA is organizing a series of information sessions about the call. The first one will be organised during the ATM World Congress at the FABEC OPS Theatre on 6/03 from 15:15 to 16:15. Interested users are very welcome to join. This session will be held in cooperation with INEA, who will present the open CEF Call 2017. More information is available at: https://www.worldatmcongress.org/fabec-ops-theatre.

There will be also webinars to explain the call in the coming months. We will publish dates and connection details as soon as dates are defined.

If you are interested in this call for proposals and have a question you would like answered, you can send it to: gnss.grants@gsa.europa.eu. For more detailed information on the call, check here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

3rd Call for EGNOS adoption in aviation is now open

CEN approves CORE specification revision

15.2.2018 13:52  
Published: 
15 February 2018

To reflect the evolution in EGNOS service provision, the European Committee for Standardization (CEN) has approved and published a revision of the CWA 16390 specification for the CORE project (Consistently Optimised Resilient Secure Global Supply-Chains) - this technical specification covers the development of products and applications based on services provided by EGNOS.

The CORE project is a supply chain management and security project co-funded by the European Commission that aims to enhance the efficiency, speed and reliability of trade and logistics while improving the effectiveness of global trade oversight, safeguarding supply chain security, and meeting other societal challenges related to global trade and logistics.

CORE aims to demonstrate how a consistently optimised resilient ecosystem, integrating interoperability, security, resilience and real-time optimisation, can produce cost effective, fast and robust solutions that guarantee the efficient and secure transit of goods through the worldwide Global Supply Chain system.

Reflecting EGNOS development

The project undertook this standardisation activity to review the CEN Workshop Agreement CWA 16390, published in 2012. Under the umbrella of CEN, and with the contribution of Italian CEN member UNI, the standardisation activity was carried out through a CEN Workshop (the CEN/WS CORE). This workshop made the revisions to reflect developments in EGNOS service provision, to include the configuration of chipsets enabling the use of EGNOS/EDAS/multi-GNSS, and to take into account the utilisation of the authentication feature of the Galileo Open Service.

Launched in January 2017, CEN/WS CORE took nine months to complete the revision, including public inquiries and open consultations, and the CWA 16390 revision “Interface control document for provision of EGNOS/EDAS/multi-GNSS based services for tracking and tracing the transport of goods” was finally approved in September 2017. It has been published by CEN and is available here.

Ensuring interoperability, supporting market development

Standards ensure interoperability while preventing the proliferation of proprietary solutions. In the field of telematics, standards lay the foundation for market exploitation, by allowing companies to turn prototypes into products and to move from demonstrations to market implementation.

CWA 16390 is the technical specification for the development of products and applications based on the services provided by the EGNOS, namely EGNOS OS and EDAS, for tracking and tracing the transport of goods. Following its publication, CWA 16390 was adopted by several European industries, and used by Italy’s and France’s ministries of transport in their national/regional systems for the management of dangerous goods transport.

The United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) Working Group, which periodically updates regulations for the international transport of dangerous goods, is currently defining the introduction of the use of telematics also taking into account CWA 16390:2018.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Managing supply chain and security (Port of Barcelona) ©@igorovsyannykov

Experiencing EGNOS – General Aviation

14.2.2018 13:58  
Published: 
14 February 2018

Just when he thought bad weather was going to force him to turn his turboprop around and miss giving an important presentation, EGNOS saved the day. General Aviation pilot Julian Scarfe shares his experience of flying with EGNOS. 

“I was recently invited by France’s Directorate General for Civil Aviation (DGAC) to travel to south Paris and give a talk on proportionate regulation for General Aviation. As the co-owner of a 1966 Twin Comanche, it seemed like the appropriate way to travel was to fly myself to Toussus Le Noble airport – just a short taxi ride away from the meeting venue. The only problem with this plan was that Toussus Le Noble is no longer a customs airport, meaning a stop at Le Touquet in northern France was necessary to clear customs en route.

“The timing was tight. Taking off from my home airport of Cambridge when it opened, I had only about an hour to spare to arrive in time for my presentation in the early afternoon. I woke up early as I often do before an interesting trip and checked the automatic weather reports at Le Touquet. Although the general weather forecast for the day was good with clear skies and fair visibility, the temperature had been dropping overnight towards the dewpoint of 11°C, and at 6:00 AM the temperature was 12°C. When temperatures hit the dewpoint, fog is inevitable.

“The last report I received before setting off was that at Le Touquet visibility was 1100 metres with broken cloud at 100 ft. This by itself was not a problem, but my heart sank when I read the Notices to Airmen (NOTAMs): Le Touquet’s instrument landing system (ILS) was out of service. I was just about to send a message to the event organiser with apologies for my absence when I realised that Le Touquet also has a GPS approach that, with the help of EGNOS in the form of LPV, has a decision height of 250 ft – almost as low as the ILS. So I set off, carrying sufficient fuel to fly to Le Touquet, hold for several hours if necessary, and fly back to Cambridge if a landing at Le Touquet proved impossible.

Bad weather ahead

“The flight as far as the Channel was uneventful. As I was handed to Lille Approach I was informed by the controller that the weather at Le Touquet was ‘pretty bad’, with a visibility of 1400 metres and overcast cloud at 200 ft. I knew this was right on the margin for an LPV approach. On the one hand, the approach and runway lighting might just be visible from the 250 ft decision height. On the other hand, it might not be... When I told the controller that I would fly the approach, he warned me that I might need to hold at the initial approach fix TUKVI because an aircraft ahead of me, a larger state aircraft, was also attempting the approach. 

“In the event, no holding was necessary, and I was cleared for the approach. I asked if the preceding aircraft had made a successful approach. ‘No,’ the controller told me, ‘he has gone around on a missed approach.’ Hearing this, I adjusted my expectations to being unable to see the lights and missing the approach too – an important mental discipline for instrument flying.

“As with most approaches in fog, the conditions feel a little strange – one flies in clear air above the thin cloud layer, in my case entering the top of it at about 650 ft in the descent. One then must rapidly adjust to instrument flying for about a minute, as the view outside disappears into the fog. The needles of the LPV indication were delightfully stable and, as I descended into the gloom, I felt confident in the guidance system, even though I knew it might not lead me low enough for a landing.

A successful experience

“At 270 ft in the descent to the decision height of 250 ft the approach and landing lights suddenly came into view. It is difficult to express in words the beauty a pilot sees when these lights come appear. Even at a time of relatively high workload, I couldn’t help but smile.

“The landing was uneventful in the reasonable visibility below cloud. On the tarmac, I taxied in to a deserted apron, walked in to show my passport to the customs officers, and paid my landing fee, which included a €5 extra charge for the approach lights – worth 100 times that to me on this occasion!

“As I was leaving, to my surprise, I heard the engines of an aircraft going around off the approach again, most likely because it was not equipped to benefit from an EGNOS-enabled LPV approach. 

“This was my first experience flying an LPV approach to minima. I found it to be identical to flying a traditional ILS, except that on my equipment the indications are displayed in cyan rather than green, and perhaps that the LPV indications are a little more stable than the ILS. In the years before the EGNOS safety of life service was operational, I would not have had the opportunity to spend the rest of that day enjoying the conference and an evening in Paris.”

EGNOS and aviation

Aviation is a key market segment for European GNSS. EGNOS, which was designed for aviation, has revolutionized the way we fly. It has created more access to small airports, increased safety and facilitated business across Europe. Across the commercial, regional, general and business aviation sectors and from airports to OMES and pilots – everyone is benefiting from EGNOS. You can learn more about all of these benefits here

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Thanks to EGNOS, General Aviation pilot Julian Scarfe was able to safely land his 1966 Twin Comanche aircraft.

IALA publishes guidelines on using EGNOS for maritime navigation

8.2.2018 10:29  
The new IALA guidelines provide information for any maritime authority wishing to understand where SBAS information could be used to support the mariner and how to employ such data.
Published: 
08 February 2018

The new guidelines aim to foster safer and more efficient maritime travel through the use of satellite-based augmentation systems (SBAS). 

Several years ago, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) became a member of the International Association of Maritime Aids to Navigation and Lighthouse Authorities (IALA). Since then, they have worked together to strengthen dialogue with the maritime sector and better respond to segment-specific requirements and needs.

Today, this work is paying off.

With the aim of fostering safer and more efficient maritime travel through the use of improved and harmonised navigation aids, earlier this month the IALA published Guidelines G-1129 on the Retransmission of SBAS Corrections using MF-Radiobeacon and AIS. “This is a major outcome of the work done by the GSA, who has worked closely with other organisations and the IALA eNav Committee to make this happen,” says GSA Head of Market Development Gian-Gherardo Calini. “The benefits offered by European GNSS, and in particular EGNOS, make a strong case for the integration of these services in multi-system receivers and for an enhanced overall maritime EGNSS market option.”

EGNOS complements marine radio beacon DGNSS

Although GNSS has become the primary means of obtaining Position, Navigation and Timing (PNT) information at sea, augmentation is required to ensure that the necessary level of integrity is achieved and accuracies improved over the use of GNSS alone. While such ground-based augmentation systems as marine radio beacon DGNSS have been in use for some time, recent developments enable SBAS, including EGNOS, to be considered for maritime use. Originally developed for aviation users, the use of SBAS by the maritime sector is increasing and these guidelines aim to serve as the cornerstone for its adoption by the sector.

The guidelines provide information for any maritime authority wishing to understand where SBAS information could be used to support the mariner and how to employ such data. While it is expected that mariners will use SBAS directly from Signal in Space (SiS), the document’s main purpose is to describe SBAS use within augmentation services via marine radio beacon and Automatic Identification System (AIS) transmissions. Although the document aims to consider common SBAS functionality, it does refer to specific SBAS services such as EGNOS. Here it includes a detailed explanation on how to transmit differential corrections and local integrity checks for satellite navigation data using the EGNOS Data Access Service (EDAS) via IALA beacons and existing AIS shore stations.

“As the reliance on GNSS increases and  there are indications that the use of so-called traditional navigation skills decreases, the IALA is very keen to establish GNSS backup,” says the IALA Secretary General Francis Zachariae. “These guidelines highlight the options that we feel provide the necessary level of availability, accuracy, continuity and integrity.”

 

The guidelines can be downloaded free here

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The new IALA guidelines provide information for any maritime authority wishing to understand where SBAS information could be used to support the mariner and how to employ such data.

IALA publishes guidelines on using EGNOS for maritime navigation

8.2.2018 10:29  
The new IALA guidelines provide information for any maritime authority wishing to understand where SBAS information could be used to support the mariner and how to employ such data.
Published: 
08 February 2018

The new guidelines aim to foster safer and more efficient maritime travel through the use of satellite-based augmentation systems (SBAS). 

Several years ago, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) became a member of the International Association of Maritime Aids to Navigation and Lighthouse Authorities (IALA). Since then, they have worked together to strengthen dialogue with the maritime sector and better respond to segment-specific requirements and needs.

Today, this work is paying off.

With the aim of fostering safer and more efficient maritime travel through the use of improved and harmonised navigation aids, earlier this month the IALA published Guidelines G-1129 on the Retransmission of SBAS Corrections using MF-Radiobeacon and AIS. “This is a major outcome of the work done by the GSA, who has worked closely with other organisations and the IALA eNav Committee to make this happen,” says GSA Head of Market Development Gian-Gherardo Calini. “The benefits offered by European GNSS, and in particular EGNOS, make a strong case for the integration of these services in multi-system receivers and for an enhanced overall maritime EGNSS market option.”

EGNOS complements marine radio beacon DGNSS

Although GNSS has become the primary means of obtaining Position, Navigation and Timing (PNT) information at sea, augmentation is required to ensure that the necessary level of integrity is achieved and accuracies improved over the use of GNSS alone. While such ground-based augmentation systems as marine radio beacon DGNSS have been in use for some time, recent developments enable SBAS, including EGNOS, to be considered for maritime use. Originally developed for aviation users, the use of SBAS by the maritime sector is increasing and these guidelines aim to serve as the cornerstone for its adoption by the sector.

The guidelines provide information for any maritime authority wishing to understand where SBAS information could be used to support the mariner and how to employ such data. While it is expected that mariners will use SBAS directly from Signal in Space (SiS), the document’s main purpose is to describe SBAS use within augmentation services via marine radio beacon and Automatic Identification System (AIS) transmissions. Although the document aims to consider common SBAS functionality, it does refer to specific SBAS services such as EGNOS. Here it includes a detailed explanation on how to transmit differential corrections and local integrity checks for satellite navigation data using the EGNOS Data Access Service (EDAS) via IALA beacons and existing AIS shore stations.

“As the reliance on GNSS increases and  there are indications that the use of so-called traditional navigation skills decreases, the IALA is very keen to establish GNSS backup,” says the IALA Secretary General Francis Zachariae. “These guidelines highlight the options that we feel provide the necessary level of availability, accuracy, continuity and integrity.”

 

The guidelines can be downloaded free here

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The new IALA guidelines provide information for any maritime authority wishing to understand where SBAS information could be used to support the mariner and how to employ such data.

Are you a Galileo fan? See what’s awaiting you at this year’s MWC!

5.2.2018 12:01  
Published: 
05 February 2018

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) will be showcasing Galileo-based innovations during the GSMA Mobile World Congress (MWC).

As the premiere mobile show, the Mobile World Congress (MWC) attracts hundreds of thousands of companies, entrepreneurs and users from around the world. It serves as the global stage for debuting and promoting exiting new innovations – from drones to smart cars, smartphones and even Artificial Intelligence.

MWC 2018, which takes place on 26 February to 1 March in Barcelona, marks the first time that the GSA will be exhibiting at the show. From Stand 8.0G17 in Hall 8, the Agency will be putting Galileo on full display. “With Galileo Initial Services launching in late 2016, this is the first show where we have Galileo products on display at MWC” says Justyna Redelkiewicz, in charge of LBS Market Development at the GSA. “With 75 million Galileo-enabled smartphones sold last year – and more models coming to market all the time – it’s really an exciting time for Galileo.”

The GSA encourages everyone to share in the excitement by visiting their booth and learning more about how Galileo enhances smartphones and other mobile devices. “We will have a range of Galileo-enabled smartphones on display, along with GNSS experts ready to show you how Galileo can improve your phone’s performance,” adds Redelkiewicz. “And if you come with a smartphone that is already using Galileo, we’ll give you a free ‘I #UseGalileo’ t-shirt to commemorate your MWC experience.”

Drones on display

In addition to smartphones, the GSA booth will also serve as a showcase on how Galileo-enabled drones benefit a range of different applications, including surveying, search and rescue and agriculture. The stand will feature displays and presentations on a number of EU-funded drone projects, including selected GSA-managed H2020 projects including 5-lives, EASY-PV, Gauss, Geovision and Mapkite, and the Argonaut solution developed within the Barcelona ESA Business Incubation Centre. 

For instance, the EASY PV project uses remotely piloted aircraft systems (RPAS) to provide a more effective and cost-efficient solution for inspecting photovoltaic (PV) plants. The automated system acquires, geo-references and processes both visual and thermal images using an RPAS equipped with a high-accuracy Galileo receiver.

MapKITE, a mapping-based project exhibiting at the GSA booth, integrates Galileo-capable drones with terrestrial mobile mapping systems to provide surveyors and mappers with an end-to-end solution for 3D high-resolution corridor mapping. “While terrestrial mobile mapping systems are becoming a standard surveying tool, their use is restricted due to their limited and insufficient view from the ground,” says Project Coordinator Pere Molina. “As mapping of small areas via drones is now a reality, this project combines the best of both worlds by incorporating aerial and terrestrial components.”    

According to the GSA, many drone manufacturers see GNSS as the answer to the growing need for highly accurate and reliable performance to ensure safe drone navigation, especially in light of the booming market for professional applications that also involve operations beyond line of sight. Luckily, GNSS offers a solution. “In order to navigate efficiently and safely, drones are becoming increasingly dependent on satellite navigation signals, including Galileo, for their robust positioning and orientation information. Multi-constellation receivers using Galileo increase availability and accuracy, an enabler for demanding operations such as those in urban areas,” says Carmen Aguilera in charge of Aviation Market Development at the GSA. “It is because of this robust navigation that drones and all of the innovations seen at MWC depend on GNSS becoming the essential infrastructure for the technology of tomorrow.”

To learn more about these or any of the other projects that will be on display, please contact market@gsa.europa.eu in advance to schedule an appointment.

MWC 2018 takes place 26 February to 1 March at Barcelona’s Fira Gran Via. The GSA is located in Hall 8, Stand 8.0G17.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Is your phone using Galileo? If so, come visit us in Hall 8, Stand 8.0G17 to get your free ‘I #UseGalileo’ t-shirt.

Are you a Galileo fan? See what’s awaiting you at this year’s MWC!

5.2.2018 12:01  
Published: 
05 February 2018

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) will be showcasing Galileo-based innovations during the GSMA Mobile World Congress (MWC).

As the premiere mobile show, the Mobile World Congress (MWC) attracts hundreds of thousands of companies, entrepreneurs and users from around the world. It serves as the global stage for debuting and promoting exiting new innovations – from drones to smart cars, smartphones and even Artificial Intelligence.

MWC 2018, which takes place on 26 February to 1 March in Barcelona, marks the first time that the GSA will be exhibiting at the show. From Stand 8.0G17 in Hall 8, the Agency will be putting Galileo on full display. “With Galileo Initial Services launching in late 2016, this is the first show where we have Galileo products on display at MWC” says Justyna Redelkiewicz, in charge of LBS Market Development at the GSA. “With 75 million Galileo-enabled smartphones sold last year – and more models coming to market all the time – it’s really an exciting time for Galileo.”

The GSA encourages everyone to share in the excitement by visiting their booth and learning more about how Galileo enhances smartphones and other mobile devices. “We will have a range of Galileo-enabled smartphones on display, along with GNSS experts ready to show you how Galileo can improve your phone’s performance,” adds Redelkiewicz. “And if you come with a smartphone that is already using Galileo, we’ll give you a free ‘I #UseGalileo’ t-shirt to commemorate your MWC experience.”

Drones on display

In addition to smartphones, the GSA booth will also serve as a showcase on how Galileo-enabled drones benefit a range of different applications, including surveying, search and rescue and agriculture. The stand will feature displays and presentations on a number of EU-funded drone projects, including selected GSA-managed H2020 projects including 5-lives, EASY-PV, Gauss, Geovision and Mapkite, and the Argonaut solution developed within the Barcelona ESA Business Incubation Centre. 

For instance, the EASY PV project uses remotely piloted aircraft systems (RPAS) to provide a more effective and cost-efficient solution for inspecting photovoltaic (PV) plants. The automated system acquires, geo-references and processes both visual and thermal images using an RPAS equipped with a high-accuracy Galileo receiver.

MapKITE, a mapping-based project exhibiting at the GSA booth, integrates Galileo-capable drones with terrestrial mobile mapping systems to provide surveyors and mappers with an end-to-end solution for 3D high-resolution corridor mapping. “While terrestrial mobile mapping systems are becoming a standard surveying tool, their use is restricted due to their limited and insufficient view from the ground,” says Project Coordinator Pere Molina. “As mapping of small areas via drones is now a reality, this project combines the best of both worlds by incorporating aerial and terrestrial components.”    

According to the GSA, many drone manufacturers see GNSS as the answer to the growing need for highly accurate and reliable performance to ensure safe drone navigation, especially in light of the booming market for professional applications that also involve operations beyond line of sight. Luckily, GNSS offers a solution. “In order to navigate efficiently and safely, drones are becoming increasingly dependent on satellite navigation signals, including Galileo, for their robust positioning and orientation information. Multi-constellation receivers using Galileo increase availability and accuracy, an enabler for demanding operations such as those in urban areas,” says Carmen Aguilera in charge of Aviation Market Development at the GSA. “It is because of this robust navigation that drones and all of the innovations seen at MWC depend on GNSS becoming the essential infrastructure for the technology of tomorrow.”

To learn more about these or any of the other projects that will be on display, please contact market@gsa.europa.eu in advance to schedule an appointment.

MWC 2018 takes place 26 February to 1 March at Barcelona’s Fira Gran Via. The GSA is located in Hall 8, Stand 8.0G17.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Is your phone using Galileo? If so, come visit us in Hall 8, Stand 8.0G17 to get your free ‘I #UseGalileo’ t-shirt.

Are you a Galileo fan? See what’s awaiting you at this year’s MWC!

5.2.2018 12:01  
Published: 
05 February 2018

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) will be showcasing Galileo-based innovations during the GSMA Mobile World Congress (MWC).

As the premiere mobile show, the Mobile World Congress (MWC) attracts hundreds of thousands of companies, entrepreneurs and users from around the world. It serves as the global stage for debuting and promoting exiting new innovations – from drones to smart cars, smartphones and even Artificial Intelligence.

MWC 2018, which takes place on 26 February to 1 March in Barcelona, marks the first time that the GSA will be exhibiting at the show. From Stand 8.0G17 in Hall 8, the Agency will be putting Galileo on full display. “With Galileo Initial Services launching in late 2016, this is the first show where we have Galileo products on display at MWC” says Justyna Redelkiewicz, in charge of LBS Market Development at the GSA. “With 75 million Galileo-enabled smartphones sold last year – and more models coming to market all the time – it’s really an exciting time for Galileo.”

The GSA encourages everyone to share in the excitement by visiting their booth and learning more about how Galileo enhances smartphones and other mobile devices. “We will have a range of Galileo-enabled smartphones on display, along with GNSS experts ready to show you how Galileo can improve your phone’s performance,” adds Redelkiewicz. “And if you come with a smartphone that is already using Galileo, we’ll give you a free ‘I #UseGalileo’ t-shirt to commemorate your MWC experience.”

Drones on display

In addition to smartphones, the GSA booth will also serve as a showcase on how Galileo-enabled drones benefit a range of different applications, including surveying, search and rescue and agriculture. The stand will feature displays and presentations on a number of EU-funded drone projects, including selected GSA-managed H2020 projects including Real, EASY-PV, Gauss, Geovision and Mapkite, and the Argonaut solution developed within the Barcelona ESA Business Incubation Centre. 

For instance, the EASY PV project uses remotely piloted aircraft systems (RPAS) to provide a more effective and cost-efficient solution for inspecting photovoltaic (PV) plants. The automated system acquires, geo-references and processes both visual and thermal images using an RPAS equipped with a high-accuracy Galileo receiver.

MapKITE, a mapping-based project exhibiting at the GSA booth, integrates Galileo-capable drones with terrestrial mobile mapping systems to provide surveyors and mappers with an end-to-end solution for 3D high-resolution corridor mapping. “While terrestrial mobile mapping systems are becoming a standard surveying tool, their use is restricted due to their limited and insufficient view from the ground,” says Project Coordinator Pere Molina. “As mapping of small areas via drones is now a reality, this project combines the best of both worlds by incorporating aerial and terrestrial components.”    

According to the GSA, many drone manufacturers see GNSS as the answer to the growing need for highly accurate and reliable performance to ensure safe drone navigation, especially in light of the booming market for professional applications that also involve operations beyond line of sight. Luckily, GNSS offers a solution. “In order to navigate efficiently and safely, drones are becoming increasingly dependent on satellite navigation signals, including Galileo, for their robust positioning and orientation information. Multi-constellation receivers using Galileo increase availability and accuracy, an enabler for demanding operations such as those in urban areas,” says Carmen Aguilera in charge of Aviation Market Development at the GSA. “It is because of this robust navigation that drones and all of the innovations seen at MWC depend on GNSS becoming the essential infrastructure for the technology of tomorrow.”

To learn more about these or any of the other projects that will be on display, please contact market@gsa.europa.eu in advance to schedule an appointment.

MWC 2018 takes place 26 February to 1 March at Barcelona’s Fira Gran Via. The GSA is located in Hall 8, Stand 8.0G17.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Is your phone using Galileo? If so, come visit us in Hall 8, Stand 8.0G17 to get your free ‘I #UseGalileo’ t-shirt.

GEO-VISION solutions help emergency responders to save lives

2.2.2018 14:05  
Published: 
02 February 2018

The RAIDO and AGILE solutions developed by partners in the project GEO-VISION (GNSS-driven EO and Verifiable Image and Sensor Integration for mission-critical Operational Networks) increase the situational awareness of emergency services and allow first responders to check the integrity of the GNSS signals they receive, increasing the efficiency of the emergency response and helping to save more lives.

For emergency services operating in disaster zones, the ability to obtain and process critical information regarding the physical environment in which they are operating, and to quickly verify the integrity of positioning information that they receive, is of vital importance – allowing them to streamline their efforts and target their response. The RAIDO and AGILE solutions developed within the GEO-VISION project address these very requirements and have commercial applications that extend beyond the project.

Supporting mission-critical communications

The first commercial offer to be generated by the project is the RAIDO solution developed by Norwegian software developer AnsuR. RAIDO is a software system for mission-critical multimedia communications. The system consists of three separate products that work both individually and together. The ASIGN component is used to communicate visual content (photos and videos), which is then streamed over unknown, changing, and bandwidth-limited networks using the ASMIRA tool. Finally, the project’s AIR component is used to route ASIGN and ASMIRA data over various networks.

The optimised communication of visual content, adaptive streaming, smart network management, geo-tagging and mapping offered by RAIDO improves decision-makers’ situational awareness, allowing them to act faster and make better decisions. RAIDO products can be used for a range of stand-alone and integrated solutions. Within the GEO-VISION project, RAIDO will improve the efficiency of crisis and disaster management, but the solution can also be put to good use in other applications, such as photo and video surveillance and security, where better situational awareness can improve operations and cut costs.

“The opportunity of having a H2020 project with the GSA was instrumental for developing mission-critical solutions to provide visual geo-intelligence from ground and aerial cameras for users in crisis and emergency situations and in security operations. We consider the impact of the project to be very high, with global interest, several offers, first sales and the deployment already of unique technologies,” Project Coordinator Harald Skinnemoen said. “We are grateful for the active support of the GSA and their experts, which helped keep focus and momentum up, and we look forward to working with the GSA again in the future."

Checking GNSS integrity

Also developed within the GEO-VISION project, the AGILE solution developed by Italy’s Rina Consulting S.p.A. (formerly D’Appolonia) is a software tool that combines receiver post-correlation anti-jamming techniques with consistency cross-checks with the inertial measurement unit (IMU) on UAVs, to combat spoofing. The AGILE tool is designed as multi-thread application in which signal integrity is checked in two sub-threads.

The first of these - GNSS Spoofing Attack Detection (SAD) – stores the positioning information from the GNSS receiver and the IMU to allow a constant cross-check between the two tracks. The second thread - GNSS Jamming Attack Detection (JAD) - constantly monitors the GNSS receiver signal acquisition log to detect anomalies. Anomalies are flagged whenever parameter values exceed a set threshold for a pre-defined amount of time.

In addition to checking the GNSS signal integrity, the tool also sends notifications to personnel in the Operation Centre about the UAV location as well as a system status message to the pilot. Like the RAIDO solution, the AGILE tool can also be replicated in other applications sensitive to precise location information, such as the transportation of dangerous goods, for example.

Solutions being rolled out

The GEO-VISION project built on existing initiatives, proven concepts, and user requirements to offer a solution that can be used to manage the operational phases of disasters and emergencies, as well as conduct rapid damage assessments as a basis for insurance and cost estimates. Following the project’s completion in December 2016, GEO-VISION’s RAIDO solutions are already being rolled out and are improving the effectiveness of emergency situation management operations by various stakeholders, such as United Nations agencies, the EU Civil Protection Mechanism as well as European police forces and emergency management authorities.

GEO-VISION consolidates Europe’s position at the forefront of both integrated satellite solutions and support for emergency management. The project has made a significant contribution both to new operational procedures in disaster management and related space based technology, specifically with respect to in-situ data access and fusion with the Copernicus programme.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GEO-VISION project increases the situational awareness of emergency services, helping them to save more lives ©GEO-VISION

GEO-VISION solutions help emergency responders to save lives

2.2.2018 14:05  
Published: 
02 February 2018

The RAIDO and AGILE solutions developed by partners in the project GEO-VISION (GNSS-driven EO and Verifiable Image and Sensor Integration for mission-critical Operational Networks) increase the situational awareness of emergency services and allow first responders to check the integrity of the GNSS signals they receive, increasing the efficiency of the emergency response and helping to save more lives.

For emergency services operating in disaster zones, the ability to obtain and process critical information regarding the physical environment in which they are operating, and to quickly verify the integrity of positioning information that they receive, is of vital importance – allowing them to streamline their efforts and target their response. The RAIDO and AGILE solutions developed within the GEO-VISION project address these very requirements and have commercial applications that extend beyond the project.

Supporting mission-critical communications

The first commercial offer to be generated by the project is the RAIDO solution developed by Norwegian software developer AnsuR. RAIDO is a software system for mission-critical multimedia communications. The system consists of three separate products that work both individually and together. The ASIGN component is used to communicate visual content (photos and videos), which is then streamed over unknown, changing, and bandwidth-limited networks using the ASMIRA tool. Finally, the project’s AIR component is used to route ASIGN and ASMIRA data over various networks.

The optimised communication of visual content, adaptive streaming, smart network management, geo-tagging and mapping offered by RAIDO improves decision-makers’ situational awareness, allowing them to act faster and make better decisions. RAIDO products can be used for a range of stand-alone and integrated solutions. Within the GEO-VISION project, RAIDO will improve the efficiency of crisis and disaster management, but the solution can also be put to good use in other applications, such as photo and video surveillance and security, where better situational awareness can improve operations and cut costs.

“The opportunity of having a H2020 project with the GSA was instrumental for developing mission-critical solutions to provide visual geo-intelligence from ground and aerial cameras for users in crisis and emergency situations and in security operations. We consider the impact of the project to be very high, with global interest, several offers, first sales and the deployment already of unique technologies,” Project Coordinator Harald Skinnemoen said. “We are grateful for the active support of the GSA and their experts, which helped keep focus and momentum up, and we look forward to working with the GSA again in the future."

Checking GNSS integrity

Also developed within the GEO-VISION project, the AGILE solution developed by Italy’s D’Appolonia S.p.A. is a software tool that combines receiver post-correlation anti-jamming techniques with consistency cross-checks with the inertial measurement unit (IMU) on UAVs, to combat spoofing. The AGILE tool is designed as multi-thread application in which signal integrity is checked in two sub-threads.

The first of these - GNSS Spoofing Attack Detection (SAD) – stores the positioning information from the GNSS receiver and the IMU to allow a constant cross-check between the two tracks. The second thread - GNSS Jamming Attack Detection (JAD) - constantly monitors the GNSS receiver signal acquisition log to detect anomalies. Anomalies are flagged whenever parameter values exceed a set threshold for a pre-defined amount of time.

In addition to checking the GNSS signal integrity, the tool also sends notifications to personnel in the Operation Centre about the UAV location as well as a system status message to the pilot. Like the RAIDO solution, the AGILE tool can also be replicated in other applications sensitive to precise location information, such as the transportation of dangerous goods, for example.

Solutions being rolled out

The GEO-VISION project built on existing initiatives, proven concepts, and user requirements to offer a solution that can be used to manage the operational phases of disasters and emergencies, as well as conduct rapid damage assessments as a basis for insurance and cost estimates. Following the project’s completion in December 2016, GEO-VISION’s RAIDO solutions are already being rolled out and are improving the effectiveness of emergency situation management operations by various stakeholders, such as United Nations agencies, the EU Civil Protection Mechanism as well as European police forces and emergency management authorities.

GEO-VISION consolidates Europe’s position at the forefront of both integrated satellite solutions and support for emergency management. The project has made a significant contribution both to new operational procedures in disaster management and related space based technology, specifically with respect to in-situ data access and fusion with the Copernicus programme.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GEO-VISION project increases the situational awareness of emergency services, helping them to save more lives ©GEO-VISION

European GNSS and Earth Observation: A promising convergence for sustainable development

31.1.2018 9:19  
Published: 
31 January 2018

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) discusses how using European GNSS (i.e., Galileo and EGNOS) with Copernicus, Europe’s Earth Observation programme, can help the world meet its Sustainable Development Goals as set out by the United Nations.

On paper, Europe’s flagship space programmes – Galileo and Copernicus – serve very different functions. Whereas Galileo provides users with high accuracy positioning and navigation, Copernicus, an Earth Observation system, analyses and provides the characteristics of a given area. Both programmes create an array of opportunities for new applications and business ideas individually, but perhaps their true potential is found within their synergies. 

Although the joint use of Galileo and Copernicus creates opportunities in nearly every market segment, it is set to play a particularly important role in sustainable development. “While Galileo and EGNOS determine a precise position anytime, anywhere on the globe, Copernicus provides information on the Earth’s surface, its atmosphere and marine systems,” says GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. “The joint use of both programmes unleashes an array of synergies that will undoubtedly have a substantial impact on sustainable development.”

Des Dorides’ remarks were made during his presentation at the United Nations’ High Level Forum on Space as a Driver for Socio-Economic Sustainable Development, held 6 – 9 November in Dubai, UAE. Jointly organised by the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA) and the United Arab Emirates Space Agency, the forum’s focus was on the use of space technology and, in particular, the combined use of European GNSS and Copernicus, in helping the world meet its Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) as set out in the UN’s 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The goals include ending poverty and hunger, ensuring healthy lives and quality education, promoting sustainable growth and reducing inequality – among others.

“Although Europe’s two flagship space programmes are capable of great achievements separately, it is through synergies that their true capabilities are unleashed,” says UNOOSA Director Simonetta Di Pippo. “The best results will be achieved when telecommunications, GNSS and Earth Observation satellites and services collaborate to achieve common goals and meet clearly stated user requirements.”

Supporting users across market many segments

The UN recognises the important role that Earth Observation and geolocation (provided by GNSS) play in supporting the achievement of its development goals. These services support a continuously increasing number of users in many different market segments. For example, one area already benefiting from their combined use is precision agriculture.

As farmers’ needs become increasingly sophisticated, they turn towards precision agriculture as a solution for higher productivity and farm profitability. While the technology has a variety of uses, the main application for precision agriculture is tractor guidance, where GNSS-based positioning applications can be used to guide a tractor around a field and minimise the effort exerted by a farmer. Moreover, Earth Observation satellites provide imagery of agricultural fields, along with radar, topographical and altimetry information. “When used together, the farmer benefits from an increase in efficiency and a decrease in labour costs,” explains des Dorides.

From providing the maps needed for finding the best locations for renewable energy infrastructure to outlining the most fuel-efficient flight paths, optimising road transportation routes and monitoring CO2 emissions, applications using both European GNSS and Earth Observation (such as Copernicus) provide the answer. However, according to des Dorides, the potential of this convergence goes far beyond the application level. “Integrated actions targeting application developers, data resellers, hardware manufacturers and end-users will further stimulate innovation and increase the use of space technology,” he says.

“This is where our focus now turns,” adds des Dorides. “I look forward to working with the UN as we enhance the convergence of European GNSS and Earth Observation data to create new solutions that will help us achieve our mutual sustainable development goals.”  

Joint study now available

The presentation served as a preface to a study on the role of European GNSS and Earth Observation in supporting the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The study, “EGNSS and COPERNICUS: Supporting the Sustainable Development Goals. Building blocks towards the 2030 Agenda”, has been jointly prepared by GSA and UNOOSA in the frame of the Memorandum of Understanding signed in July 2016 to develop common activities towards increased use of space data at application level. Specifically, the study investigates how EU space technologies support the fulfilment of the UN SDGs by means of examples and use cases. The analysis shows that all the SDGs are positively impacted by the benefits stemming from the use of EGNSS and Copernicus applications and that almost 40% of the associated indicators directly benefit from using the EGNSS and Copernicus services, either supporting the monitoring of the status of achievement of a given SDG or actively contributing to their fulfilment.

The study has recently been published, and is available for download here.

GEO-VISION: A Case Study in Synergy

Precise and up-to-date information on damage and needs during emergencies is key to plan and conduct response and rehabilitation efforts in areas affected by disasters. In this context, technology enables responders to better coordinate rescue missions and work efficiently as soon as they arrive in a disaster zone.

The Horizon 2020 project GEO-VISION aims to save lives and to protect critical infrastructures during emergencies and disasters by optimizing the use of satellite data ranging from satellite communication and navigation to earth observation.

How does it work?

The core of the project is a mission-critical visual communication software solution wherein the end users upload imagery of disaster-struck areas to disaster response and emergency management operators. Data from the crisis site are sent to the control centre using satellite communications or mobile networks, depending on availability.

Within the system, the operational pictures can be taken from Earth Observation satellites providing large scale aerial situation, from UAVs monitoring more in detail the affected infrastructures or from other sources such as smartphones of the crisis response teams. GNSS is used to provide trust in the data and in the communications by geo-localizing and time-stamping picture information. Trust countermeasures includes Galileo signal authentication for spoofing and jamming.

The project already resulted in the creation of three smartphone apps available for iOS and Android, with the end user group encompassing the United Nations, EU, World Bank and insurance companies.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The UN recognises the important role that Earth Observation and GNSS play in supporting the achievement of its development goals.

European GNSS – key enabling technologies for a connected, prosperous digital Europe

30.1.2018 16:00  
Published: 
30 January 2018

The second day of the Tenth Conference on European Space Policy in Brussels saw a significant contribution from GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides on the role of European GNSS and other EU space systems in the future of Europe, digitalisation and competitiveness. The conference, which has become Europe’s premier annual forum for space policy debate, took place on 23 and 24 January 2018 with the overall theme of ‘More Space for more Europe – stronger together’.

Des Dorides’ contribution followed opening remarks for the second day from Mariya Gabriel, European Commissioner for Digital Economy and Society, who emphasised the positive links between space and digital policy and the need to ensure a “fair and correct” digital infrastructure that served the needs of all European citizens. “Space has a major role to play in a digital Europe,” she said. And GSA, Galileo and EGNOS have a key role.

Space is an increasingly important component for a prosperous Europe and an asset for a more connected society and economy. The European GNSS Agency (GSA) and the flagship Galileo programme are essential elements of the EU’s space programme. But how does this fit with the digital agenda?

"Space is enabling the digitally connected world that we are only starting to appreciate now, but that will be the world of future generations,” said Carlo des Dorides. “Satellite navigation, positioning and timing enables ubiquitous connectivity between people, services and infrastructures."

The World is changing fast. There are now more than five billion smartphones in use in the World – in the EU there are more smartphones than humans. These devices place in citizens’ hands powerful sensors and computing. Geolocation is becoming ubiquitous and where the smartphone goes, internet goes too. And for this, two components - content and connectivity – were developing in parallel, said des Dorides.

Today, as the physical limits of Moore’s law on computing power are being reached, computing is moving into invisible infrastructure such as embedded computing and cloud computing. Satellite technologies were part of this invisible infrastructure offering added security from cyber-attacks compared to terrestrial systems.

Knowledge is key 

“Knowledge building is crucial for the future of Europe,” said des Dorides. “And investing in innovation is key to shaping this fast-changing world.” Europe needs to ensure that it can access the right talent to ensure continuing prosperity.

Galileo is providing excellent infrastructure for jobs and growth in Europe. “Today some 50 000 jobs in Europe are linked to the implementation of Galileo and EGNOS in downstream industries,” claimed des Dorides. “This compares to some 3 000 jobs in upstream industries.”

“By switching from a satellite launch model to a business service model, the GSA has enabled the Galileo application market to grow and contribute to a more prosperous and successful Europe,” concluded des Dorides.

Christian Ehler, MEP and member of the European Parliament’s industry (ITRE) Committee reinforced the value of satellite technologies to EU competitiveness, jobs and growth and said that his party, the European Peoples Party (EPP), would be supporting the space budget in the forthcoming Multi-annual Financial Framework (MFF) discussions to ensure full implementation of the EU’s flagship satellite programmes: Galileo and Copernicus.

In later panel discussions on ‘Space for security and defence in Europe: beyond the dual-use’ Tomasz Husak, Head of Cabinet for European Commissioner Bieńkowska praised the progress made during 2017 and that Galileo was now delivering the most precise signal on Earth: “at the room level rather than just the house” he claimed. And he looked forward to the launch of Galileo’s PRS secure signal.

Jorge Domecq, Chief Executive, European Defence Agency, also emphasised the dual use capabilities of both the Copernicus and Galileo satellite systems.

Roberto Battiston, President of the Italian Space Agency reminded the conference that if the EU wanted to become the reliable global space power for peace and development, it needed to build up its workforce and capability, reinforcing the point made earlier by Carlo des Dorides.

Closing praise

In his closing remarks, Jerzy Buzek, MEP, Chair of the European Parliament’s ITRE Committee, also highlighted the MFF debate and underlined the need for adequate funding to “carry on the success of Galileo, Copernicus and EGNOS” and take on the emerging issues, such as cyber security.

In particular, he felt that the GSA required more resources. “This is a potential risk to one of our flagship projects,” he claimed and called on the European Commission to ensure adequate funding for the agency. “The ITRE Committee was ready to support this,” he said.

Finally, Emil Karanikolov, the Bulgarian Minister of Economy, concluded the conference on behalf of the European Council Presidency. He said the presidency was “convinced of the strategic nature of the sector” and the need to “take the possibilities given by space policy.”

He praised the EU flagship satellite programmes, Galileo and Copernicus, calling them undoubted successes. He said that the Bulgarian Presidency would support the success of these leading EU programmes, adding that their development and continuity were of paramount importance as drivers of jobs, growth and competitiveness.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Carlo des Dorides (third from right) at the Tenth European Space Policy Conference

Galileo quartet – what stage are the satellites at now?

30.1.2018 9:23  
Published: 
30 January 2018

Six weeks ago, four new Galileo satellites were successfully launched from the European spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana. A lot has happened since then, as the satellites move towards their final orbit and prepare for the first transmission of navigation signals.

At exactly 19:36:08 CET on December 12, an Ariane 5 rocket lifted-off from Kourou carrying four Galileo satellites: Nicole, Zofia, Alexandre, and Irina. Four hours later, the satellites established first contact with Earth, unfolded their solar panels and reached a stable configuration. However, the story does not end there, as the satellites go through a number of crucial stages between their launch and reaching their final position.

Days after their launch, the four satellites transited from sun acquisition mode to Earth tracking mode, also called nominal operational mode (NOM), where they point to the Earth and all antennas are orientated towards the ground. After transition to NOM, the satellites began moving up to Galileo orbit, and Nicole and Zofia made the first and second manoeuvres.

Watch this: Ariane 5 ES launches Galileo FOC-M7 satellites

Nicole was first to finish all of its manoeuvres and control of the satellite was transferred from the EOP team in Toulouse to the Galileo Control Centres in Fucino and Oberpfaffenhofen, leaving the remaining three satellites under the control of the EOP team. At this stage the launch NAGU was published on the GSC website. Then, control of Zofia was transferred to the Galileo Control Centre and Alexandre and Irina started their manoeuvres - control of these satellites was later transferred to the GCC.

What next?

The four satellites are currently in the correct orbit and are drifting, in pairs, to their final slots. As soon as they reach their final position, they will be ready to start payload testing. After payload testing starts, it will still be several months before the satellites go into service.

GSA oversees EOP

This launch was the first mission in which the European GNSS Agency (GSA) was responsible for the Early Orbit Phase (EOP). GSA worked hand-in-hand with ESA, responsible for the launch phase, oversaw Spaceopal (joint venture between Telespazio and DLR-GfR) in their new role as Galileo Service Operator, and French Space Agency (CNES)- responsible for EOP operations. The EOP is one of the most important phases of a space mission as it positions the spacecraft into the correct orbits after launch, and gradually switches on and tests the first satellite elements.

The EOP activities were led by a team of specialists from GSA which oversaw the operations teams of Spaceopal and CNES. EOP operations were conducted from a dedicated control room in the CNES Centre Spatial de Toulouse, from which the team monitored and controlled all of the main EOP stages.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The satellites are currently in the correct orbit and are drifting to their final slots. ©ArianeSpace

Galileo quartet – what stage are the satellites at now?

30.1.2018 9:23  
Published: 
30 January 2018

Six weeks ago, four new Galileo satellites were successfully launched from the European spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana. A lot has happened since then, as the satellites move towards their final orbit and prepare for the first transmission of navigation signals.

At exactly 19:36:08 CET on December 12, an Ariane 5 rocket lifted-off from Kourou carrying four Galileo satellites: Nicole, Zofia, Alexandre, and Irina. Four hours later, the satellites established first contact with Earth, unfolded their solar panels and reached a stable configuration. However, the story does not end there, as the satellites go through a number of crucial stages between their launch and reaching their final position.

Days after their launch, the four satellites transited from sun acquisition mode to Earth tracking mode, also called nominal operational mode (NOM), where they point to the Earth and all antennas are orientated towards the ground. After transition to NOM, the satellites began moving up to Galileo orbit, and Nicole and Zofia made the first and second manoeuvres.

Watch this: Ariane 5 ES launches Galileo FOC-M7 satellites

Nicole was first to finish all of its manoeuvres and control of the satellite was transferred from the EOP team in Toulouse to the Galileo Control Centres in Fucino and Oberpfaffenhofen, leaving the remaining three satellites under the control of the EOP team. At this stage the launch NAGU was published on the GSC website. Then, control of Zofia was transferred to the Galileo Control Centre and Alexandre and Irina started their manoeuvres - control of these satellites was later transferred to the GCC.

What next?

The four satellites are currently in the correct orbit and are drifting, in pairs, to their final slots. As soon as they reach their final position, they will be ready to start payload testing. After payload testing starts, it will still be several months before the satellites go into service.
GSA oversees EOP

This launch was the first mission in which the European GNSS Agency (GSA) was responsible for the Early Orbit Phase (EOP). GSA worked hand-in-hand with ESA, responsible for the launch phase, oversaw Spaceopal (joint venture between Telespazio and DLR-GfR) in their new role as Galileo Service Operator, and French Space Agency (CNES)- responsible for EOP operations. The EOP is one of the most important phases of a space mission as it positions the spacecraft into the correct orbits after launch, and gradually switches on and tests the first satellite elements.

The EOP activities were led by a team of specialists from GSA which oversaw the operations teams of Spaceopal and CNES. EOP operations were conducted from a dedicated control room in the CNES Centre Spatial de Toulouse, from which the team monitored and controlled all of the main EOP stages.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The satellites are currently in the correct orbit and are drifting to their final slots

Galileo quartet – what stage are the satellites at now?

30.1.2018 9:23  
Published: 
30 January 2018

Six weeks ago, four new Galileo satellites were successfully launched from the European spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana. A lot has happened since then, as the satellites move towards their final orbit and prepare for the first transmission of navigation signals.

At exactly 19:36:08 CET on December 12, an Ariane 5 rocket lifted-off from Kourou carrying four Galileo satellites: Nicole, Zofia, Alexandre, and Irina. Four hours later, the satellites established first contact with Earth, unfolded their solar panels and reached a stable configuration. However, the story does not end there, as the satellites go through a number of crucial stages between their launch and reaching their final position.

Days after their launch, the four satellites transited from sun acquisition mode to Earth tracking mode, also called nominal operational mode (NOM), where they point to the Earth and all antennas are orientated towards the ground. After transition to NOM, the satellites began moving up to Galileo orbit, and Nicole and Zofia made the first and second manoeuvres.

Watch this: Ariane 5 ES launches Galileo FOC-M7 satellites

Nicole was first to finish all of its manoeuvres and control of the satellite was transferred from the EOP team in Toulouse to the Galileo Control Centres in Fucino and Oberpfaffenhofen, leaving the remaining three satellites under the control of the EOP team. At this stage the launch NAGU was published on the GSC website. Then, control of Zofia was transferred to the Galileo Control Centre and Alexandre and Irina started their manoeuvres - control of these satellites was later transferred to the GCC.

What next?

The four satellites are currently in the correct orbit and are drifting, in pairs, to their final slots. As soon as they reach their final position, they will be ready to start payload testing. After payload testing starts, it will still be several months before the satellites go into service.

GSA oversees EOP

This launch was the first mission in which the European GNSS Agency (GSA) was responsible for the Early Orbit Phase (EOP). GSA worked hand-in-hand with ESA, responsible for the launch phase, oversaw Spaceopal (joint venture between Telespazio and DLR-GfR) in their new role as Galileo Service Operator, and French Space Agency (CNES)- responsible for EOP operations. The EOP is one of the most important phases of a space mission as it positions the spacecraft into the correct orbits after launch, and gradually switches on and tests the first satellite elements.

The EOP activities were led by a team of specialists from GSA which oversaw the operations teams of Spaceopal and CNES. EOP operations were conducted from a dedicated control room in the CNES Centre Spatial de Toulouse, from which the team monitored and controlled all of the main EOP stages.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The satellites are currently in the correct orbit and are drifting to their final slots

GSA to host Fundamental Elements Info Day in Prague

22.1.2018 11:48  
Published: 
22 January 2018

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is to host the second Fundamental Elements Info Day at its headquarters in Prague on March 14, 2018. The info day will focus on upcoming FE funding opportunities, as well as providing an update on the status of the programme.

Participating in the Info Day will be representatives from the European Commission/GSA, in addition to stakeholders from ongoing projects and from the GNSS industry. The event will provide a brief update of the status of the Galileo constellation and services, an overview of the Fundamental Elements funding scheme as well as many opportunities for networking.

The detailed agenda for the Info Day includes the priority topics that GSA is financing under Fundamental Elements. Part of the programme is a presentation of calls for proposals open for submission and of upcoming calls in 2018, including the calls for enhanced mass-market devices and IoT receivers and for Galileo multi-frequency multipurpose antennae. The most recent call opened under the FE scheme is for proposals targeting the development of a Galileo-based timing receiver for critical infrastructures such as telecommunications, power distribution networks and the financial sector. The deadline for the submission of proposals in this call is 28 March 2018.

There will also be a follow-up on the implementation of feedback from the 1st Fundamental Elements Info Day, held in March 2016.

The Info Day will end with an introduction to Fundamental Elements projects that are currently ongoing and projects that are about to start, and with a presentation from the GSA Market Development and Legal departments on what you need to know to write a successful proposal.

If you would like to attend the Fundamental Elements Info Day, you can register here.

What is Fundamental Elements?

Fundamental Elements is an EU R&D funding mechanism supporting the development of EGNSS-enabled chipsets, receivers and antennae. Fundamental Elements projects are part of the overall European GNSS strategy for market uptake, led by the GSA. The objectives of the programme can be summarised as follows:

  • Facilitate the adoption of EGNSS, building on innovative services and differentiators;
  • Improve the competitiveness of EU industry ;
  • Address user needs in priority market segments ;
  • Maximise benefits to European citizens.

The total budget for projects to be carried out in 2015-2020 is EUR 111.5 million.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Mark your calendars for the 2nd Fundamental Elements, to be held in Prague on March 14, 2018

Galileo supports PV plant maintenance

18.1.2018 9:42  
Published: 
18 January 2018

As photovoltaic plants age, their efficiency often falls due to the underperformance of one component or another, requiring PV plant owners to conduct expensive and time-consuming thermal inspections to get to the bottom of the problem. EASY PV, a GSA-funded Horizon 2020 project, is using remotely piloted aircraft systems (RPAS) to provide a more effective and cost-efficient solution.

As Europe’s older PV plants start to reach over ten years of continuous operations, some of their individual modules and components are reaching the end of their design life span. The associated failures and breakdowns mean that plant owners are now paying a lot of attention to maintenance technologies and processes in order to enhance energy production at their plants.

High-quality EGNSS receiver

Thermographic analysis is the best and most effective way to locate defective cells and modules in PV arrays. However, thermal inspections, currently performed by operators with handheld cameras, are time consuming and can be expensive, due to the associated safety procedures required for those conducting the tests.

The current state of the art solutions exploit RPAS technology to gather thermal images. This reduces the time, costs and risks for personnel involved in maintenance operations. However, these solutions do not normally use geo-referencing techniques. This means that a huge amount of post processing work is required to get a PV plant status synthesis that is viable for the plant owners.

Responding to this need for a more efficient PV plant inspection solution, EASY PV (EGNSS High-Accuracy System Improving Photovoltaic Plant Maintenance) is building an automated system for acquiring, geo-referencing and processing images, both visual and thermal, using an RPAS equipped with a high-accuracy EGNSS receiver.

Marco Nisi, Head of Integrated GNSS Solutions at Sistematica S.p.A., the coordinator of the project, said that recent tests had shown extremely encouraging results. “The EASY-PV solution has had the experience of monitoring a dozen selected PV plants in Italy, mainly in Terni, Caserta and Cuneo. More than 98% of faulty panels were correctly recognised and a final report was generated in a very short period of time. This gives us the confidence to confirm our presence on the Italian market and paves the way to introduce the service all over Europe, thanks to our growing RPAS pilots’ and PV maintainers’ affiliation network,” he said.

Engaging with stakeholders

EASY-PV was presented at two energy events at the end of last year. At the first of these - the Key Energy trade fair in Rimini on 7-10 November - the GSA supported EASY-PV, attending as its main sponsor. At the event, the GSA also presented upcoming Galileo services that support energy-related applications to stakeholders in the energy value chain.

The second event was the O&M and Asset Management Conference in London in December, which was organised by the Solar Trade Association and SolarPower Europe (formerly the European Photovoltaic Industry Association – EPIA). The EASY-PV solution was presented as a case study at this event, which facilitated networking with peers, clients and suppliers. Galileo was introduced as a key element of the EASY-PV solution, with the GSA acting as a partner - promoting O&M best practice guidelines across Europe, increasing awareness and encouraging industry uptake.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Copyright EASY PV © EASY PV, a GSA-funded Horizon 2020 project, uses remotely piloted aircraft systems (RPAS) in a cost-efficient solution for PV plant maintenance

Galileo supports PV plant maintenance

18.1.2018 9:42  
Published: 
18 January 2018

As photovoltaic plants age, their efficiency often falls due to the underperformance of one component or another, requiring PV plant owners to conduct expensive and time-consuming thermal inspections to get to the bottom of the problem. EASY PV, a GSA-funded Horizon 2020 project, is using remotely piloted aircraft systems (RPAS) to provide a more effective and cost-efficient solution.

As Europe’s older PV plants start to reach over ten years of continuous operations, some of their individual modules and components are reaching the end of their design life span. The associated failures and breakdowns mean that plant owners are now paying a lot of attention to maintenance technologies and processes in order to enhance energy production at their plants.

High-quality EGNSS receiver

Thermographic analysis is the best and most effective way to locate defective cells and modules in PV arrays. However, thermal inspections, currently performed by operators with handheld cameras, are time consuming and can be expensive, due to the associated safety procedures required for those conducting the tests.

The current state of the art solutions exploit RPAS technology to gather thermal images. This reduces the time, costs and risks for personnel involved in maintenance operations. However, these solutions do not normally use geo-referencing techniques. This means that a huge amount of post processing work is required to get a PV plant status synthesis that is viable for the plant owners.

Responding to this need for a more efficient PV plant inspection solution, EASY PV (EGNSS High-Accuracy System Improving Photovoltaic Plant Maintenance) is building an automated system for acquiring, geo-referencing and processing images, both visual and thermal, using an RPAS equipped with a high-accuracy EGNSS receiver.

Marco Nisi, Head of Integrated GNSS Solutions at Sistematica S.p.A., the coordinator of the project, said that recent tests had shown extremely encouraging results. “The EASY-PV solution has had the experience of monitoring a dozen selected PV plants in Italy, mainly in Terni, Caserta and Cuneo. More than 98% of faulty panels were correctly recognised and a final report was generated in a very short period of time. This gives us the confidence to confirm our presence on the Italian market and paves the way to introduce the service all over Europe, thanks to our growing RPAS pilots’ and PV maintainers’ affiliation network,” he said.

Engaging with stakeholders

EASY-PV was presented at two energy events at the end of last year. At the first of these - the Key Energy trade fair in Rimini on 7-10 November - the GSA supported EASY-PV, attending as its main sponsor. At the event, the GSA also presented upcoming Galileo services that support energy-related applications to stakeholders in the energy value chain.

The second event was the O&M and Asset Management Conference in London in December, which was organised by the Solar Trade Association and SolarPower Europe (formerly the European Photovoltaic Industry Association – EPIA). The EASY-PV solution was presented as a case study at this event, which facilitated networking with peers, clients and suppliers. Galileo was introduced as a key element of the EASY-PV solution, with the GSA acting as a partner - promoting O&M best practice guidelines across Europe, increasing awareness and encouraging industry uptake.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

EASY PV, a GSA-funded Horizon 2020 project, uses remotely piloted aircraft systems (RPAS) in a cost-efficient solution for PV plant maintenance. (©EASY PV)

ESCAPE completes preliminary design of positioning engine

17.1.2018 10:58  
Published: 
17 January 2018

The ESCAPE project, funded under the European GNSS Agency’s (GSA) Fundamental Elements programme, has completed the preliminary design of its ESCAPE GNSS Engine (EGE), an innovative positioning engine that leverages the Galileo signal to provide a critical positioning component in autonomous vehicles.

To navigate autonomously and safely, vehicles require perception systems that locate, recognise, identify, and classify objects around them. The more complex the navigation functions, the more sensors are needed to achieve the degree of robustness required to drive safely in complex traffic conditions. This is where GNSS-based absolute location estimates come in.

Robust and safe positioning

The EGE prototype design includes several major components: a novel multi-frequency, multi-constellation GNSS receiver chipset for automotive use; the hardware and software architectures; and the algorithms for data fusion, positioning and integrity. It also covers a safety analysis of all the elements of the positioning engine. Consequently, the EGE will enable vehicles to navigate in high automation modes (SAE level 4) in various operational environments.

The positioning capability of the EGE is based on a complex algorithm produced by the GNSS sensor. Its measurements are integrated with those from an inertial unit (IMU) to provide the baseline standard point positioning function. A second positioning level is provided by precise point positioning, which gets sets of precise corrections from the Internet for the GNSS measurements. Finally, camera-based positioning, enabled by the processing of high-definition maps with lane markings and merged with other vehicle sensors, offers a third level of positioning, enhancing the other levels to achieve maximum possible accuracy.

The whole architecture of the EGE hardware has been conceived based the most recent practices in the design of automotive electronic control units, so that all the interfaces, configurations and form factors are compliant with widely recognised sector trends.

The GNSS receiver

The main distinguishing feature of the ESCAPE automotive-grade GNSS receiver is its ability to simultaneously process signals from two different GNSS bands and from different satellite constellations. Although this capability is common in high-end professional receivers, it is cutting-edge in the automotive Tier-2 panorama.

The receiver is also a first-of-a-kind device in its segment to support the new Navigation Message Authentication (NMA) service of Galileo, the additional anti-spoofing service to be offered by Galileo on the open E1 signal starting from 2018. Finally, the new GNSS receiver comes with several core signal-processing enhancements: better receiver sensitivity and tracking capability, multipath mitigation, more IF channels and flexibility in routing IF samples, jamming detection and mitigation, and optimisation of the GNSS data flow.

The result is an ESCAPE GNSS sensor that combines in a unique device a high-end GNSS technology traditionally reserved for professional applications, innovative dual-band Galileo processing, as well as all the hardware and software safety aspects that are needed to certify the component for the automotive market.

Fundamental information

Launched in October 2016, the ESCAPE project is led by the Spanish company FICOSA in collaboration with GMV, Renault, IFSTTAR, STMicroelectronics and the Istituto Superiore Mario Boella. The project is funded under the European GNSS Agency’s (GSA) Fundamental Elements programme, a research and development (R&D) funding mechanism supporting the development of GNSS-enabled chipsets, receivers and antennas.

The project has now entered its second year, during which the first EGE hardware samples will be released, along with a sequence of three integration steps and tests distributed throughout the year. The second and final hardware release is expected during the project’s third year.

For more information, see: http://www.gnss-escape.eu/

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The ESCAPE GNSS engine leverages the Galileo signal to provide positioning for autonomous vehicles

Available Now: White Paper on using GNSS Raw Measurements on Android devices

16.1.2018 9:59  
Published: 
16 January 2018

A newly published White Paper provides developers with in-depth information on accessing and using GNSS raw measurements with Android, to implement advanced GNSS techniques in mass-market devices. 

Google’s announcement that GNSS raw measurements would be made available from Android 7.0 devices (i.e., Nougat) marked the first-time developers had access to carrier and code measurements and decoded navigation messages from a mass-market device.

The advantages of using these measurements are many. For instance, developers can use this information to implement advanced GNSS techniques in mass-market devices and to compute a position using selected satellites/constellations, optimizing the use of Galileo. When combined with external sensors, raw measurements increase the time when position, velocity and time (PVT) can be computed. More so, Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring provides another layer of integrity in mass-market devices using raw measurements.

“We believe these raw measurements are a real game changer, re-defining the GNSS on our smartphones,” says Lukasz Bonenberg from the University of Nottingham and a member of the GSA’s GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force. “Not only does it allow us to work directly with GNSS data – for post-processing, testing and teaching – but also to find new ways of using GNSS on smartphones, which will lead to new applications that add value to smartphone-based services.”

Despite these advantages, the use of GNSS raw measurements remains limited to testing by GNSS experts. In fact, there are only a handful of smartphone apps that currently use raw measurements. This is, in part, due to the fact that Java coders are usually not GNSS experts, meaning they need help understanding Android raw measurements. Furthermore, the GNSS community typically works with standard formats, such as RINEX and NMEA. As neither of these are available for an Android platform, developers must learn new, non-standard formats.   

The reference for using raw measurements

To help bridge this knowledge gap and facilitate the use of GNSS Raw Measurements in mass market applications, the GSA’s GNSS Raw Measurement Task Force has published a White Paper entitled Using GNSS Raw Measurements on Android Devices: Towards better location performance in mass market applications. As the de facto international reference for accessing and using raw measurements, the White Paper aims to present raw measurements to the GNSS community, demonstrate their use through practical examples and increase awareness and use of GNSS in general.

“In the White Paper we present some examples of the main mass-market application areas that could benefit from increased accuracy,” says Gian Gherardo Calini, Head of Market Development Department at GSA. “This represents the starting point, one that should stimulate application developers – and even GNSS experts – to explore using raw measurements and at the same time help optimize the use of Galileo.”

The White Paper includes an in-depth description of raw measurements and how to use them, along with numerous case studies and information on user benefits. It is divided into four parts:

  • Part I: overview of the theoretical basics needed to reconstruct GNSS raw measurements using Android, including a basic overview of GNSS, GNSS time references, pseudoranges, navigation messages and position estimation.
  • Part II: information on how to access and use raw measurements, including generating pseudoranges and Doppler.
  • Part III: a look at the most promising techniques and discussion on the benefits and limitations of each technique.
  • Part IV: use cases that may benefit from the increased accuracy and integrity obtained with the use of GNSS raw measurements.

The paper is free of charge and can be downloaded here.

About the GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force

Launched in June 2017 and coordinated by the European GNSS Agency (GSA), the GNSS Raw Measurements Task Force aims to share knowledge and expertise on Android raw measurements and its use, including its potential for high accuracy positioning techniques relevant to mass market applications. The Task Force includes GNSS experts, scientists and market players, all of whom are dedicated to promoting a wider use of these raw measurements.

More information on the Task Force, its members and their work can be found here.

Opportunity for Galileo

Galileo stands to play a big role in the use of GNSS raw measurements. For example, a recent experiment compared the performance of two PVT solutions, one that included Galileo measurements and one that did not. Both solutions were based on raw measurements coming from a smartphone. With raw measurements, users can select which constellation the PVT uses and which satellites are filtered out. This experiment showed that by opting to include Galileo in the PVT solution through the raw measurements, users can easily experience the added accuracy and availability it provides.

“Thanks to the raw measurements, we could compute the Galileo only fix in our lab,” says Airbus’ Moises Navarro Gallardo, who is also a Task Force member. “Smartphone application developers finally have access to more detailed data by satellite, and the White Paper fully describes how to work with this data.”

The experiment, which is further described in the White Paper, also shows how raw measurements enable other GNSS differentiators. For example, Galileo’s Open Service Authentication, a unique feature not found in other constellations, is included in raw measurements. As a result, developers can use this to authenticate navigation messages.

“After testing some of the smartphones that support GNSS raw measurements, it is clear we can further demonstrate the added value of the Galileo constellation in a multi-GNSS mass-market receiver,” adds Task Force member Paolo Crosta from the European Space Agency (ESA).

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The White Paper aims to present raw measurements to the GNSS community, demonstrate their use through practical examples and increase awareness and use of GNSS in general.

GSA publishes eCall guidelines to facilitate GNSS compatibility tests

10.1.2018 10:46  
Published: 
10 January 2018

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) and the Joint Research Centre, the European Commission’s in-house science service, have published a joint report containing a set of guidelines to facilitate the implementation of eCall testing in compliance with the EU Regulation 2017/79 by technical centres in charge of issuing the EC type-approval for eCall On-Board Units (OBU).

In March 2017, the GSA officially launched a Galileo and EGNOS test campaign, which allowed eCall device manufacturers to pre-test Galileo and EGNOS compatibility. eCall device manufacturers, such as tier-1 suppliers, were invited to participate and assess their devices’ capability to support the reception and processing of the Galileo and EGNOS signals.

This testing initiative followed the publication, on 17 January 2017, of European Commission Delegated Regulation (EU) 2017/79, which stipulates that all new models of passenger cars (M1) and light duty vehicles (N1) types must be equipped with eCall in-vehicle systems as of 31 March 2018.

Commenting on the motivation behind the eCall guidelines, GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides said that, thanks to its in depth GNSS market knowledge and the support of the entire user community, the GSA identified the need for the eCall industry value chain to pre-test the accuracy of their new devices and understand how to reap the benefits of Galileo.

“Many leading industry players, from chipsets to on-board-system manufacturers and car-makers, joined GSA and JRC in this initiative. They fully appreciated the support offered to enhance their products, which by 2021 will reach cumulative sales of 13 million units, representing about 90% of newly sold cars in Europe. Based on the outcome of this  testing, we are now publishing these Guidelines for manufacturers,  a resource that will facilitate and accelerate the adoption of Galileo in all new models of cars in Europe, contributing to faster emergency response and ultimately saving lives,” des Dorides said.

The campaign, being conducted in cooperation with the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre (JRC), aimed to pre-test eCall in-vehicle models and evaluate their compatibility with the positioning services provided by Galileo and EGNOS in accordance with the test procedures established by the EU Regulation. The tests made it possible to thoroughly review the requirements and the test procedures, assessing a wide range of different testing implementation options. Among others, the tests assessed:

  • Positioning accuracy under static and dynamic conditions;
  • Cold start time-to-first-fix;
  • Re-acquisition performance following signal outages;
  • Receiver sensitivity.

Elżbieta Bieńkowska, Commissioner for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs, said: “Knowing the precise location of an accident is crucial for saving lives. Using Europe's own satellite navigation system Galileo, which is operational for a year now, will enable the emergency response teams to locate the accident with much greater accuracy. The mandatory eCall system is a puzzle piece of how our mobility will look like in the future: connected and automated driving with low and zero-emission cars. With the roll-out of eCall in April 2018, we are taking a major step forward for adoption of Galileo in the automotive market."

Lessons learned

Based on the extensive tests, which were conducted at the JRC’s GNSS laboratory in Ispra, Italy, a number of recommendations were made, which are relevant to one or more test procedures Some recommendations with the potential to substantially affect the final result of the testing include:

  • The “test object” may or may not include a low noise amplifier (LNA), depending on the actual commercial configuration of the eCall On-Board Unit.
  • The setting of the power levels for the right components of the GNSS signals is of utmost importance. Also, the calibration of the eCall test bed cannot be neglected.
  • The relative geometry of the GNSS satellites with respect to the user location is very important to perform the tests. Meeting the Point Dilution Of Precision (PDOP) requirement is a key element to be carefully assessed.
  •  The eCall DUT must be able to use SBAS corrections, therefore the GNSS simulator has to be set in such a way that the corrections are enabled in the region where the test scenario is located.

The guidelines aim to illustrate how the requirements stated in the eCall Regulation might be translated in practice into a suite of test scenarios, acknowledging that several alternative testing configurations and implementations can be compliant with the EU Regulation. The full list of recommendations is available in the report.

An opportunity not to be missed

The test campaign is still ongoing. Manufacturers are encouraged to take advantage of this opportunity, which is completely free-of-charge and voluntary, to support their preparation for type approval. All results will be kept confidential and covered by individual non-disclosure agreements.

For more information, contact the GSA Market Development Department (market@gsa.europa.eu).

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The implementing guidelines will facilitate the implementation of eCall testing by technical centres in charge of issuing the EC type-approval for eCall On-Board Units.

An LBS application for every occasion

4.1.2018 8:53  
Published: 
04 January 2018

Developers use the SpaceTech2017 Hackathon to demonstrate the many ways that LBS applications can benefit users of every kind.

GNSS-enabled location-based services comprise a multitude of applications tailor-made to satisfy different uses and needs. These applications are supported by a range of devices, including smartphones and tablets, personal tracking devices, wearables, digital cameras and portable computers. The uses of these LBS applications are infinite and include everything from navigation to mapping, geo-marketing, advertising, safety response, sports, gaming, augmented reality, social networking and mobile health – to name only a few.

The full spectrum of LBS applications was on display at the recent SpaceTech2017 Hackathon, held in Tartu, Estonia. Organised by Estonian event planning company Garage48 and with the support of the GSA and the European Space Agency (ESA), the hackathon brought together 122 developers, engineers, data scientists, designers and marketers from 23 different countries. Teams were challenged with coming up with exciting ideas using different elements from different streams to create location-based solutions that integrated GNSS – all within just 48 hours. 

A travel journal for the digital age

At the end of the 48-hour hackathon, a number of impressive applications were presented. One of those was SIGHTVEL, an intuitive application that allows users to create ‘memory maps’ of their travels. As one travels, the app uses the user’s location to geotag the images and notes that a traveller takes. These are then added to the route map. The result is a ready-made travel-log that can be easily shared with family and friends, who can then follow along with your travels in real-time.

“My grandfather was a truck driver, and I remember him using a little atlas book to record each of the places he went,” says project leader Papuna Janashvili. “It was this memory that inspired me to create an atlas book for the digital age.”

A lifeline for the elderly

LIFELINE, another application developed during the hackathon, functions as an intelligent lifestyle assistance and safety monitoring system for the elderly and disabled. It features mobility-as-a-service (MaaS) that employs advanced GNSS capabilities and Earth Observation data.

“LIFELINE uses Copernicus data, for example, to predict when environmental conditions could be hazardous to an older person’s health,” explains project leader Jeffrey Wallace. Using such devices as Amazon’s Alexis, the application then provides audio suggestions, such as: “It will be very hot this afternoon, would you like to go to the shopping centre to relax and visit your friends?” Based on the user’s response, the application then schedules a bus or other mode of transport to pick the user up.

The full spectrum

These are just a couple of the many LBS applications that came out of the hackathon. Others included the TeamONGrid application, which uses Military Grid Reference System (MGRS) maps for tracking military endurance competitions. Meanwhile, the Run Me If You Can game is a fun social fitness app that lets runners interact and compete in real time with other runners from around the world.

There was even an app idea for beer lovers. SpaceBeer is a high-altitude balloon that follows the user who is, for example, hiking down below. When the user gets thirsty, they simply click a button on their smartphone and the balloon releases a beer that is delivered via parachute. Needless to say, this app is more of a concept than a reality, but iDoBalloon, another balloon-based application, is the real deal. At the hackathon, the team built an educational DIY high altitude balloon that can be sent to the stratosphere, where it provides science students with a unique point of view and a one-of-a-kind learning opportunity.

So whether it’s for fun or to provide a lifesaving service, as we saw during the SpaceTech2017 Hackathon, if there’s not an app for it yet, chances are, there soon will be. The next opportunity to test your GNSS app-dev skills will be at ActinSpace 2018.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The full spectrum of LBS applications was on display at the recent SpaceTech2017 Hackathon, held in Tartu, Estonia.

GSA announces new funding opportunity for development of Galileo-based timing receiver

21.12.2017 12:08  
Published: 
21 December 2017

Following the expansion of the Galileo constellation and the declaration of Initial Services, the availability of Galileo Timing & Synchronisation solutions has become of strategic importance. Moreover, the European Commission has pre-announced the introduction of Galileo in critical infrastructures.

Against this backdrop, the GSA is launching a call for proposals, the main objective of which is to develop a Galileo-based timing receiver for these infrastructures.

Proposals should define the user’s and timing receiver requirements; design, develop, test and validate the prototype with simulated and real data scenarios; and contain the following essential elements:

  • The prototype receiver should include, as a minimum, a mode of operation to obtain the Galileo System Time and UTC based on Galileo signals only, both in single and multiple frequency;
  • Robust receiver solutions should be implemented;
  • The interfaces to be implemented are: PTP, NTP, SyncE, PPS, 10 MHz, and IRIG-B.

 

A webinar will be held on the 11 January 2018 to inform applicants on how to prepare a successful proposal. To register for the webinar, click here. Potential applicants can also address questions related to the content of this call directly to the GSA at this e-mail: gnss.grants@gsa.europa.eu. Responses will be posted on the call page on the GSA website.

Furthermore, the GSA also plans to hold an Info Day at its headquarters in Prague on 14 March 2018, focusing on upcoming opportunities under Fundamental Elements. The event will also provide an update on the status of the programme. Participants in the Info Day will have the opportunity to meet with representatives from the European Commission/GSA, ongoing Fundamental Elements projects and the GNSS industry. Registration for the Info Day will open in the first week of January – so stay tuned!

 

Fundamental Elements call: At a glance

  • Deadline for submission of proposals: 28 March 2018
  • Expected signature of contract: August 2018
    • Maximum budget allocated: EUR 3.500.000
    • Maximum number of projects: 2
    • Indicative EU financing amount for each of the two projects: EUR 1.750.000 (70% co-funding)
    • Webinar date: 11 January 2018

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link the article back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu)
.

The FE call aims at developing a Galileo-based receiver to provide accurate and robust timing for critical infrastructures

GSA announces new funding opportunity for development of Galileo-based timing receiver

21.12.2017 12:08  
Published: 
21 December 2017

Following the expansion of the Galileo constellation and the declaration of Initial Services, the availability of Galileo Timing & Synchronisation solutions has become of strategic importance. Moreover, the European Commission has pre-announced the introduction of Galileo in critical infrastructures.

Against this backdrop, the GSA is launching a call for proposals, the main objective of which is to develop a Galileo-based timing receiver for these infrastructures.

Proposals should define the user’s and timing receiver requirements; design, develop, test and validate the prototype with simulated and real data scenarios; and contain the following essential elements:

  • The prototype receiver should include, as a minimum, a mode of operation to obtain the Galileo System Time and UTC based on Galileo signals only, both in single and multiple frequency;
  • Robust receiver solutions should be implemented;
  • The interfaces to be implemented are: PTP, NTP, SyncE, PPS, 10 MHz, and IRIG-B.

 

A webinar will be held on the 11 January 2018 to inform applicants on how to prepare a successful proposal. To register for the webinar, click here. Potential applicants can also address questions related to the content of this call directly to the GSA at this e-mail: gnss.grants@gsa.europa.eu. Responses will be posted on the call page on the GSA website.

Furthermore, the GSA also plans to hold an Info Day at its headquarters in Prague on 14 March 2018, focusing on upcoming opportunities under Fundamental Elements. The event will also provide an update on the status of the programme. Participants in the Info Day will have the opportunity to meet with representatives from the European Commission/GSA, ongoing Fundamental Elements projects and the GNSS industry. Registration for the Info Day will open in the first week of January – so stay tuned!

 

Fundamental Elements call: At a glance

  • Deadline for submission of proposals: 28 March 2018
  • Expected signature of contract: August 2018
    • Maximum budget allocated: EUR 3.500.000
    • Maximum number of projects: 2
    • Indicative EU financing amount for each of the two projects: EUR 1.750.000 (70% co-funding)
    • Webinar date: 11 January 2018

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link the article back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu)
.

The FE call aims at developing a Galileo-based receiver to provide accurate and robust timing for critical infrastructures

GSA announces new funding opportunity for development of Galileo-based timing receiver

21.12.2017 12:08  
Published: 
21 December 2017

Following the expansion of the Galileo constellation and the declaration of Initial Services, the availability of Galileo Timing & Synchronisation solutions has become of strategic importance. Moreover, the European Commission has pre-announced the introduction of Galileo in critical infrastructures.

Against this backdrop, the GSA is launching a call for proposals, the main objective of which is to develop a Galileo-based timing receiver for these infrastructures.

Proposals should define the user’s and timing receiver requirements; design, develop, test and validate the prototype with simulated and real data scenarios; and contain the following essential elements:

  • The prototype receiver should include, as a minimum, a mode of operation to obtain the Galileo System Time and UTC based on Galileo signals only, both in single and multiple frequency;
  • Robust receiver solutions should be implemented;
  • The interfaces to be implemented are: PTP, NTP, SyncE, PPS, 10 MHz, and IRIG-B.

 

A webinar will be held on the 11 January 2018 to inform applicants on how to prepare a successful proposal. To register for the webinar, click here. Potential applicants can also address questions related to the content of this call directly to the GSA at this e-mail: gnss.grants@gsa.europa.eu. Responses will be posted on the call page on the GSA website.

Furthermore, the GSA also plans to hold an Info Day at its headquarters in Prague on 14 March 2018, focusing on upcoming opportunities under Fundamental Elements. The event will also provide an update on the status of the programme. Participants in the Info Day will have the opportunity to meet with representatives from the European Commission/GSA, ongoing Fundamental Elements projects and the GNSS industry. Registration for the Info Day will open in the first week of January – so stay tuned!

 

Fundamental Elements call: At a glance

  • Deadline for submission of proposals: 28 March 2018
  • Expected signature of contract: August 2018
  • Maximum budget allocated: EUR 3.500.000
  • Maximum number of projects: 2
  • Indicative EU financing amount for each of the two projects: EUR 1.750.000 (70% co-funding)
  • Webinar date: 11 January 2018

     

    Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link the article back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu)
    .

    The FE call aims at developing a Galileo-based receiver to provide accurate and robust timing for critical infrastructures

    GSA announces new funding opportunity for development of Galileo-based timing receiver

    21.12.2017 12:08  
    Published: 
    21 December 2017

    Following the expansion of the Galileo constellation and the declaration of Initial Services, the availability of Galileo Timing & Synchronisation solutions has become of strategic importance. Moreover, the European Commission has pre-announced the introduction of Galileo in critical infrastructures.

    Against this backdrop, the GSA is launching a call for proposals, the main objective of which is to develop a Galileo-based timing receiver for these infrastructures.

    Proposals should define the user’s and timing receiver requirements; design, develop, test and validate the prototype with simulated and real data scenarios; and contain the following essential elements:

    • The prototype receiver should include, as a minimum, a mode of operation to obtain the Galileo System Time and UTC based on Galileo signals only, both in single and multiple frequency;
    • Robust receiver solutions should be implemented;
    • The interfaces to be implemented are: PTP, NTP, SyncE, PPS, 10 MHz, and IRIG-B.

     

    A webinar will be held on the 11 January 2018 to inform applicants on how to prepare a successful proposal. To register for the webinar, click here. Potential applicants can also address questions related to the content of this call directly to the GSA at this e-mail: gnss.grants@gsa.europa.eu. Responses will be posted on the call page on the GSA website.

    Furthermore, the GSA also plans to hold an Info Day at its headquarters in Prague on 14 March 2018, focusing on upcoming opportunities under Fundamental Elements. The event will also provide an update on the status of the programme. Participants in the Info Day will have the opportunity to meet with representatives from the European Commission/GSA, ongoing Fundamental Elements projects and the GNSS industry. Registration for the Info Day will open in the first week of January – so stay tuned!

     

    Fundamental Elements call: At a glance

    • Deadline for submission of proposals: 28 March 2018
    • Expected signature of contract: August 2018
    • Maximum budget allocated: EUR 3.500.000
    • Maximum number of projects: 2
    • Indicative EU financing amount for each of the two projects: EUR 1.750.000 (70% co-funding)
    • Webinar date: 11 January 2018

       

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link the article back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu)
      .

      The FE call aims at developing a Galileo-based receiver to provide accurate and robust timing for critical infrastructures

      Message from Carlo des Dorides, Executive Director of the European GNSS Agency

      20.12.2017 15:51  
      Published: 
      20 December 2017

      A great year for Galileo, and the GSA

      2017 was a year marked with milestones. Following the Declaration of Initial Services last December, on July 1 the GSA officially took responsibility for the Galileo operations and service provision. In June, we formally received the keys to the new Galileo Reference Centre (GRC) in The Netherlands, a facility that plays a pivotal role, with independent monitoring of and reporting on Galileo’s performance. Furthermore, as of July 1, the Galileo Security Monitoring Centre (GSMC) began delivering services 24/7, supporting the configuration of Initial Services.

      In parallel, additional satellites are being added to the Galileo constellation. Just last week we saw the successful launch of four more satellites, bringing the constellation to a total of 22. This satellite launch was special for the GSA, as it was the first time the GSA played a role with responsibility for the Early Orbit Phase of the mission and overseeing Spaceopal GmbH in their new role as the Galileo Service Operator (GSOp). This role is essential to ensuring proper system performance and a related return on investment from Galileo in the form of value-added services and applications.

      The GSA’s achievements have also been highlighted in a mid-term review performed by the EC, and endorsed by the Parliament and Council. This is an important recognition of the hard work and commitment of the entire European GNSS community.

      Last but not least, the GSA ISO-9001 re-certification reconfirmed that the Agency is growing on a solid foundation of quality.

      Bringing value to the market

      Throughout the year, the GSA made headway in maximising Galileo user adoption. In November, we welcomed nearly 280 users to the 1st Galileo User Assembly – with many more joining in remotely. Here we inaugurated another important milestone for the Galileo programme: the User Consultation Platform (UCP). Through this innovative platform, users from a wide range of market segments can share information on needs and market trends and define their Position, Navigation and Timing (PNT) user requirements.

      We also continued our close work with chipset and receiver manufacturers, as they are essential to Galileo’s success. A highlight here was Broadcom’s launch of the BCM47755 – the world’s first mass-market, dual frequency GNSS receiver device for smartphones.  Indeed our market development efforts are paying off. When Apple unveiled its much-anticipated iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus and iPhone X earlier this year, it announced that each was Galileo-enabled. The new iPhones join a growing list of top smartphone brands that support Galileo, including a range of phones from BQ, Huawei, Samsung, Meizu and Sony.

      Moving EGNOS forward

      Even though Galileo dominated much of the headlines this year, 2017 was also another banner year for EGNOS, which has been providing an excellent performance to users. The highlight was the signing of the EGNOS GEO 3 contract, which marks a major milestone in the programme’s development. We are also making real progress on EGNOS Version 3, and I am hopeful that the contract will be signed soon.

      New year, new achievements

      But enough about the past, it’s time to look ahead! With 2018 on the horizon, I see improved performance for both Galileo and EGNOS and ever-increasing market uptake. A particular focus will be on ensuring that we achieve the Enhanced Services milestone for Galileo in 2018. As we quickly move towards Full Operational Capability (FOC), I have no doubt that Galileo is poised to become the second GNSS constellation of choice – supporting billions of users worldwide.  

      As 2017 draws to a close, my heartfelt thanks go to the GSA staff for their hard work and commitment, and special thanks go to the European GNSS community for their trust and support throughout the year.

      Happy Holidays to all of you.  

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      Carlo des Dorides, GSA Executive Director

      Message from Carlo des Dorides, Executive Director of the European GNSS Agency

      20.12.2017 15:51  
      Published: 
      20 December 2017

      A great year for Galileo, and the GSA

      2017 was a year marked with milestones. Following the Declaration of Initial Services last December, on July 1 the GSA officially took responsibility for the Galileo operations and service provision.

      In June, we formally received the keys to the new Galileo Reference Centre (GRC) in The Netherlands, a facility that plays a pivotal role, with independent monitoring of and reporting on Galileo’s performance. Furthermore, as of July 1, the Galileo Security Monitoring Centre (GSMC) began delivering services 24/7, supporting the configuration of Initial Services.

      In parallel, additional satellites are being added to the Galileo constellation. Just last week we saw the successful launch of four more satellites, bringing the constellation to a total of 22. This satellite launch was special for the GSA, as it was the first time the GSA played a role with responsibility for the Early Orbit Phase of the mission and overseeing Spaceopal GmbH in their new role as the Galileo Service Operator (GSOp). This role is essential to ensuring proper system performance and a related return on investment from Galileo in the form of value-added services and applications.

      The GSA’s achievements have also been highlighted in a mid-term review performed by the EC, and endorsed by the Parliament and Council. This is an important recognition of the hard work and commitment of the entire European GNSS community.

      Last but not least, the GSA ISO-9001 re-certification reconfirmed that the Agency is growing on a solid foundation of quality.

      Bringing value to the market

      Throughout the year, the GSA made headway in maximising Galileo user adoption. In November, we welcomed nearly 280 users to the 1st Galileo User Assembly – with many more joining in remotely. Here we inaugurated another important milestone for the Galileo programme: the User Consultation Platform (UCP). Through this innovative platform, users from a wide range of market segments can share information on needs and market trends and define their Position, Navigation and Timing (PNT) user requirements.

      We also continued our close work with chipset and receiver manufacturers, as they are essential to Galileo’s success. A highlight here was Broadcom’s launch of the BCM47755 – the world’s first mass-market, dual frequency GNSS receiver device for smartphones.  Indeed our market development efforts are paying off. When Apple unveiled its much-anticipated iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus and iPhone X earlier this year, it announced that each was Galileo-enabled. The new iPhones join a growing list of top smartphone brands that support Galileo, including a range of phones from BQ, Huawei, Samsung, Meizu and Sony.

      Moving EGNOS forward

      Even though Galileo dominated much of the headlines this year, 2017 was also another banner year for EGNOS, which has been providing an excellent performance to users. The highlight was the signing of the EGNOS GEO 3 contract, which marks a major milestone in the programme’s development. We are also making real progress on EGNOS Version 3, and I am hopeful that the contract will be signed soon.

      New year, new achievements

      But enough about the past, it’s time to look ahead! With 2018 on the horizon, I see improved performance for both Galileo and EGNOS and ever-increasing market uptake. A particular focus will be on ensuring that we achieve the Enhanced Services milestone for Galileo in 2018. As we quickly move towards Full Operational Capability (FOC), I have no doubt that Galileo is poised to become the second GNSS constellation of choice – supporting billions of users worldwide.  

      As 2017 draws to a close, my heartfelt thanks go to the GSA staff for their hard work and commitment, and special thanks go to the European GNSS community for their trust and support throughout the year.

      Happy Holidays to all of you.  

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      Carlo des Dorides, GSA Executive Director

      First Galileo Service Provision Workshop gives update on system performance

      19.12.2017 15:27  
      Flores Diaz Pulido of the European Commission opens Day 2 plenary

      The Assembly had three main parts together with ample opportunities for the Galileo user community to network. The launch of the Galileo User Consultation Platform (see separate article) and a visit to the GSC itself (see separate article) were complemented by the first Galileo Service Provision Workshop. This had its main session on the morning of 29 November and presented the observed performance of the system over its first year of service operation and plans for the evolution of the services.

      Service provision workshop

      The first ever Galileo Service Provision Workshop was opened by Flores Diaz Pulido from European Commission DG Grow. She had worked with Commissioner Loyola de Palacio in the early years of Galileo and was happy to see that Galileo was now a functioning reality.

      Rodrigo da Costa, Galileo Services Programme Manager at the GSA, updated users on the status of the Galileo Services and the GSA. Currently, Initial Services are provided to users around the globe, with relevant information to the users published on the GSC website in real time and detailed performance of Open Service and Search and Rescue Service provided quarterly.

      In addition, new ground infrastructure was in place across Europe including the Galileo Reference Centre in the Netherlands, The Galileo Search and Rescue (SAR) Centre in Toulouse and the Galileo Integrated Logistics Centre that opens 1 December in Belgium, he noted.

      He also anticipated the launch of enhanced services and activities on high accuracy and authentication.

      Rodrigo Da Costa updates the Assembly on the Initial Services status

      The actual performance of Galileo during Initial Service was described by Alberto Madrazo of the GSA. Overall the system had displayed high signal availability, excellent ranging accuracy – managing an average ranging accuracy during August of 0.3 metres, and a timing accuracy averaging at 9.3 nanoseconds. This compares to the Initial Services target of 30 nanoseconds. In general, the performance of the system was consistently far exceeding its defined minimum performance levels.

      “The performance of Galileo, with its partial constellation and less than one year’s operational experience, is already at least as good as GPS, with its full constellation and 25 years operational experience,” claimed Madrazo.

      In terms of the future he saw that the trends showed “continuous improvement that will pave the way to enhanced services.”

      Reference measure

      Peter Buist, Manager of the Galileo Reference Centre (GRC), also supported the quality of Galileo’s performance. The role of the GRC is to provide independent performance monitoring of Galileo and other GNSS with reporting based around a set of key performance indicators (KPIs). The GRC represented a fully independent system based at Noordwijk in The Netherlands and also receives monitoring data from other Member States.

      “The GRC helps ensure that Galileo users are provided with very high-quality signals for use with an array of new navigation applications,” said Buist.

      The GRC has also been nominated by the European Commission to act as the European Monitoring and Analysis Centre for Galileo as part of a joint United Nations project monitoring GNSS.

      Alvaro Mozo, GSA’s Galileo Service Engineering Manager declared that “Galileo is here and working well but challenges remain.” He gave an overview of the next steps to improve the services, which rely on continuous monitoring, further infrastructure deployment and validation campaigns, while assuring service continuity at the same time.

      Closing the Assembly, Flores Diaz Pulido praised the innovative, thorough and committed nature of the event participants. “The two days have exceeded my expectations,” she said. There was still much work to be done, but she was “sure that with Galileo in your hands – all of you - it will be a success.”

      For news, images and presentations from the Galileo User Assembly, click here.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link the article back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      First Galileo Service Provision Workshop gives update on system performance

      19.12.2017 15:27  
      Published: 
      19 December 2017

      The Assembly had three main parts together with ample opportunities for the Galileo user community to network. The launch of the Galileo User Consultation Platform (see separate article) and a visit to the GSC itself (see separate article) were complemented by the first Galileo Service Provision Workshop. This had its main session on the morning of 29 November and presented the observed performance of the system over its first year of service operation and plans for the evolution of the services.

      Service provision workshop

      The first ever Galileo Service Provision Workshop was opened by Flores Diaz Pulido from European Commission DG Grow. She had worked with Commissioner Loyola de Palacio in the early years of Galileo and was happy to see that Galileo was now a functioning reality.

      Rodrigo da Costa, Galileo Services Programme Manager at the GSA, updated users on the status of the Galileo Services and the GSA. Currently, Initial Services are provided to users around the globe, with relevant information to the users published on the GSC website in real time and detailed performance of Open Service and Search and Rescue Service provided quarterly.

      In addition, new ground infrastructure was in place across Europe including the Galileo Reference Centre in the Netherlands, The Galileo Search and Rescue (SAR) Centre in Toulouse and the Galileo Integrated Logistics Centre that opens 1 December in Belgium, he noted.

      He also anticipated the launch of enhanced services and activities on high accuracy and authentication.

      The actual performance of Galileo during Initial Service was described by Alberto Madrazo of the GSA. Overall the system had displayed high signal availability, excellent ranging accuracy – managing an average ranging accuracy during August of 0.3 metres, and a timing accuracy averaging at 9.3 nanoseconds. This compares to the Initial Services target of 30 nanoseconds. In general, the performance of the system was consistently far exceeding its defined minimum performance levels.

      “The performance of Galileo, with its partial constellation and less than one year’s operational experience, is already at least as good as GPS, with its full constellation and 25 years operational experience,” claimed Madrazo.

      In terms of the future he saw that the trends showed “continuous improvement that will pave the way to enhanced services.”

      Reference measure

      Peter Buist, Manager of the Galileo Reference Centre (GRC), also supported the quality of Galileo’s performance. The role of the GRC is to provide independent performance monitoring of Galileo and other GNSS with reporting based around a set of key performance indicators (KPIs). The GRC represented a fully independent system based at Noordwijk in The Netherlands and also receives monitoring data from other Member States.

      “The GRC helps ensure that Galileo users are provided with very high-quality signals for use with an array of new navigation applications,” said Buist.

      The GRC has also been nominated by the European Commission to act as the European Monitoring and Analysis Centre for Galileo as part of a joint United Nations project monitoring GNSS.

      Alvaro Mozo, GSA’s Galileo Service Engineering Manager declared that “Galileo is here and working well but challenges remain.” He gave an overview of the next steps to improve the services, which rely on continuous monitoring, further infrastructure deployment and validation campaigns, while assuring service continuity at the same time.

      Closing the Assembly, Flores Diaz Pulido praised the innovative, thorough and committed nature of the event participants. “The two days have exceeded my expectations,” she said. There was still much work to be done, but she was “sure that with Galileo in your hands – all of you - it will be a success.”

      For news, images and presentations from the Galileo User Assembly, click here.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link the article back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      First Galileo Service Provision Workshop gives update on system performance

      19.12.2017 15:27  
      Flores Diaz Pulido of the European Commission opens Day 2 plenary
      Published: 
      19 December 2017

      The Assembly had three main parts together with ample opportunities for the Galileo user community to network.

      The launch of the Galileo User Consultation Platform (see separate article) and a visit to the GSC itself (see separate article) were complemented by the first Galileo Service Provision Workshop. This had its main session on the morning of 29 November and presented the observed performance of the system over its first year of service operation and plans for the evolution of the services.

      Service provision workshop

      The first ever Galileo Service Provision Workshop was opened by Flores Diaz Pulido from European Commission DG Grow. She had worked with Commissioner Loyola de Palacio in the early years of Galileo and was happy to see that Galileo was now a functioning reality.

      Rodrigo da Costa, Galileo Services Programme Manager at the GSA, updated users on the status of the Galileo Services and the GSA. Currently, Initial Services are provided to users around the globe, with relevant information to the users published on the GSC website in real time and detailed performance of Open Service and Search and Rescue Service provided quarterly.

      In addition, new ground infrastructure was in place across Europe including the Galileo Reference Centre in the Netherlands, The Galileo Search and Rescue (SAR) Centre in Toulouse and the Galileo Integrated Logistics Centre that opens 1 December in Belgium, he noted.

      He also anticipated the launch of enhanced services and activities on high accuracy and authentication.

      The actual performance of Galileo during Initial Service was described by Alberto Madrazo of the GSA. Overall the system had displayed high signal availability, excellent ranging accuracy – managing an average ranging accuracy during August of 0.3 metres, and a timing accuracy averaging at 9.3 nanoseconds. This compares to the Initial Services target of 30 nanoseconds. In general, the performance of the system was consistently far exceeding its defined minimum performance levels.

      “The performance of Galileo, with its partial constellation and less than one year’s operational experience, is already at least as good as GPS, with its full constellation and 25 years operational experience,” claimed Madrazo.

      In terms of the future he saw that the trends showed “continuous improvement that will pave the way to enhanced services.”

      Reference measure

      Peter Buist, Manager of the Galileo Reference Centre (GRC), also supported the quality of Galileo’s performance. The role of the GRC is to provide independent performance monitoring of Galileo and other GNSS with reporting based around a set of key performance indicators (KPIs). The GRC represented a fully independent system based at Noordwijk in The Netherlands and also receives monitoring data from other Member States.

      “The GRC helps ensure that Galileo users are provided with very high-quality signals for use with an array of new navigation applications,” said Buist.

      The GRC has also been nominated by the European Commission to act as the European Monitoring and Analysis Centre for Galileo as part of a joint United Nations project monitoring GNSS.

      Alvaro Mozo, GSA’s Galileo Service Engineering Manager declared that “Galileo is here and working well but challenges remain.” He gave an overview of the next steps to improve the services, which rely on continuous monitoring, further infrastructure deployment and validation campaigns, while assuring service continuity at the same time.

      Closing the Assembly, Flores Diaz Pulido praised the innovative, thorough and committed nature of the event participants. “The two days have exceeded my expectations,” she said. There was still much work to be done, but she was “sure that with Galileo in your hands – all of you - it will be a success.”

      For news, images and presentations from the Galileo User Assembly, click here.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link the article back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      Flores Diaz Pulido of the European Commission opens Day 2 plenary

      First Galileo Service Provision Workshop gives update on system performance

      19.12.2017 15:27  
      Flores Diaz Pulido of the European Commission opens Day 2 plenary
      Published: 
      19 December 2017

      The Assembly had three main parts together with ample opportunities for the Galileo user community to network.

      The launch of the Galileo User Consultation Platform and a visit to the GSC itself were complemented by the first Galileo Service Provision Workshop. This had its main session on the morning of 29 November and presented the observed performance of the system over its first year of service operation and plans for the evolution of the services.

      Service provision workshop

      The first ever Galileo Service Provision Workshop was opened by Flores Diaz Pulido from European Commission DG Grow. She had worked with Commissioner Loyola de Palacio in the early years of Galileo and was happy to see that Galileo was now a functioning reality.

      Rodrigo da Costa, Galileo Services Programme Manager at the GSA, updated users on the status of the Galileo Services and the GSA. Currently, Initial Services are provided to users around the globe, with relevant information to the users published on the GSC website in real time and detailed performance of Open Service and Search and Rescue Service provided quarterly.

      In addition, new ground infrastructure was in place across Europe including the Galileo Reference Centre in the Netherlands, The Galileo Search and Rescue (SAR) Centre in Toulouse and the Galileo Integrated Logistics Centre that opens 1 December in Belgium, he noted.

      He also anticipated the launch of enhanced services and activities on high accuracy and authentication.

      The actual performance of Galileo during Initial Service was described by Alberto Madrazo of the GSA. Overall the system had displayed high signal availability, excellent ranging accuracy – managing an average ranging accuracy during August of 0.3 metres, and a timing accuracy averaging at 9.3 nanoseconds. This compares to the Initial Services target of 30 nanoseconds. In general, the performance of the system was consistently far exceeding its defined minimum performance levels.

      “The performance of Galileo, with its partial constellation and less than one year’s operational experience, is already at least as good as GPS, with its full constellation and 25 years operational experience,” claimed Madrazo.

      In terms of the future he saw that the trends showed “continuous improvement that will pave the way to enhanced services.”

      Reference measure

      Peter Buist, Manager of the Galileo Reference Centre (GRC), also supported the quality of Galileo’s performance. The role of the GRC is to provide independent performance monitoring of Galileo and other GNSS with reporting based around a set of key performance indicators (KPIs). The GRC represented a fully independent system based at Noordwijk in The Netherlands and also receives monitoring data from other Member States.

      “The GRC helps ensure that Galileo users are provided with very high-quality signals for use with an array of new navigation applications,” said Buist.

      The GRC has also been nominated by the European Commission to act as the European Monitoring and Analysis Centre for Galileo as part of a joint United Nations project monitoring GNSS.

      Alvaro Mozo, GSA’s Galileo Service Engineering Manager declared that “Galileo is here and working well but challenges remain.” He gave an overview of the next steps to improve the services, which rely on continuous monitoring, further infrastructure deployment and validation campaigns, while assuring service continuity at the same time.

      Closing the Assembly, Flores Diaz Pulido praised the innovative, thorough and committed nature of the event participants. “The two days have exceeded my expectations,” she said. There was still much work to be done, but she was “sure that with Galileo in your hands – all of you - it will be a success.”

      For news, images and presentations from the Galileo User Assembly, click here.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link the article back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      Flores Diaz Pulido of the European Commission opens Day 2 plenary

      Happy Birthday Galileo Initial Services!

      15.12.2017 13:58  
      Published: 
      15 December 2017

      Today, December 15, marks the first anniversary of the declaration of Galileo Initial Services. This is an ideal opportunity to look back at what has proven to be an exciting year full of achievements for Galileo, as well as the European GNSS Agency (GSA).

      The most recent milestone, falling almost on the anniversary of the Galileo Initial Services declaration, was the successful launch, on December 12, of four new Galileo satellites from the European spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana, bringing the Galileo constellation to a total of 22 satellites and reinforcing the provision of Galileo services. This mission was the first for which the GSA was part of the launch team and responsible for the Launch and Early Orbit Phase (LEOP), overseeing Spaceopal in its role as Galileo Service Operator (GSOp) and LEOP Mission Director.

      Watch this: Galileo Initial Services – one year on

      An eventful year

      Responsibility for the LEOP mission came as a result of the July 1 handover to the GSA of oversight of operations and service provision for Galileo. This was a milestone for the programme and the agency, as this responsibility includes overseeing the operation of key Galileo service facilities, ensuring a return on investment in Galileo in the form of across-the-board services and applications, and maximising Galileo adoption across user segments.

      Since the declaration of Initial Services, many device and chip manufacturers have taken steps to incorporate Galileo into their products. In September, Apple launched its latest iPhone offering, which included, for the first time, built-in support for Galileo, among other GNSS. This announcement completed the list of major smartphones brands compatible with Galileo.

      Also in September, Broadcom Limited, a leading developer of digital and analogue semiconductor connectivity solutions, announced the launch of the world’s first mass-market, dual frequency GNSS receiver device for smartphones, the BCM47755, enabling a new suite of high-precision LBS applications. The expanded availability of L1/E1 and L5/E5 frequencies in satellite constellations, in particular thanks to Galileo, makes it possible to use both frequencies to compute position much more accurately.

      And this: Galileo in your pocket

      To keep track of the ever-expanding range of Galileo-enabled devices serving a variety of needs as they become available, check out: USE.GALILEO.EU.

      Feedback from users

      These expanded opportunities for using Galileo fed into the discussions at the 1st Galileo User Assembly, held in Madrid on November 28-29. This event brought together 280 Galileo users to participate in the first EGNSS User Consultation Platform and share their experience, discuss their needs and provide feedback on Galileo performance, one year after the launch of Galileo Initial Services. This feedback and user experience is a valuable tool in fine-tuning and improving the provision of Galileo services – so we invite you to participate in our Galileo user satisfaction survey here.

      “Thanks to the hard work and teamwork of the European Commission, the European Space Agency, the GSA, and a network of excellent industrial partners across Europe, Galileo has truly taken positive strides forward since last December’s milestone,” says Carlo des Dorides, GSA Executive Director. “The future is bright for Galileo and satellite navigation users around the globe.”

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      2017 has been a year of important milestones for both Galileo and the GSA

      Galileo Integrated Logistic Support Centre inaugurated

      14.12.2017 14:05  
      Published: 
      14 December 2017

      On December 1 the Galileo Integrated Logistic Support (ILS) Centre, built to the highest environmental standards, was inaugurated at the GALAXIA European Space Applications Park in Transinne, Belgium, in the presence of Belgian Mobility Minister François Bellot.

      Galileo’s satellites communicate with 16 ground stations and these, in turn, ensure that the Galileo constellation continues to deliver reliable accurate and secure positioning and timing. To allow these stations operate to the highest standards, they need to have easy access to highly specialised parts that can be rapidly delivered to where they are needed. The Galileo ILS Centre will be the go-to point for those managing ground stations and will be staffed with highly qualified engineers specialised in robotics, aeronautics and IT.

      Central location

      From its central location in Transinne, the Galileo ILS Centre will support an efficient spare part and repair provisioning service for Galileo ground infrastructure. The Centre will be in charge of guaranteeing the proper spare part stock for corrective and preventive maintenance. It will also reset and update equipment received from the stations, or ship it to the manufacturers for more comprehensive retrofits, should this be necessary.

      The Galileo ILS Centre will ensure that Galileo ground stations get all the specialised parts they need, when they need them.

      The Galileo ILS Centre is located close to major transport hubs; it is highly secured and can generate most of the electricity it needs to operate. The GSA is in charge of the centre, which is run by the Galileo Service Operator (GSOp) under a EUR 1.5 billion contract signed in December 2016.

      Speaking at the launch ceremony, GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides said that the Galileo ILS Centre would allow the GSA, through the Galileo Service Operator and its logistics partner Vitrociset, to efficiently manage material stocks, conduct repairs and support operational requirements. “This is a fundamental component of the Galileo system,” he said.

      Bellot said the project was important for Belgium: “Belgium has invested a lot in space technology and Galileo. We have a lot of large companies working in this area. Galileo is a European project par excellence that will provide great added value. I’m thinking, for example, of autonomous vehicles that will need the high precision provided by the Galileo system.”

      IDELUX President Elie Deblire, who led the project, outlined the centre’s state-of-the-art features. The building has two separate and independent fibre-optic networks, 3,000 sensors measuring everything from humidity to security, 228 solar panels, as well as five geothermal sources of energy.

      Watch this: Galileo Integrated Logistics Support Centre

      DG GROW Deputy Director General Pierre Delsaux underlined how important it is to celebrate Europe’s successes. He said that Galileo was a great European project and that “Europe needs great projects”. Delsaux had met with European ministers with responsibility for competitiveness that morning to discuss the EU's space programmes. Estonia Entrepreneurship and Information Technology Minister Urve Palo said after the meeting: "Today we have two EU's space flagship programmes, Galileo and Copernicus, that are delivering significant value to European citizens and to the economy. […] The world has become digital and the EU's space policy is an essential instrument for moving towards a digitalised and data-driven economy in Europe."
      The Galileo ILS project is another important part of the flagship programme.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      New Galileo quartet successfully launched

      13.12.2017 16:06  
      Published: 
      13 December 2017

       

      Four new Galileo satellites were successfully launched on December 12 from the European spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana. This launch brings the Galileo constellation to a total of 22 satellites.

      Taking place on the 1st anniversary of the launch of Galileo Initial Services last December, and a week after the first Galileo User Assembly in Madrid, the successful launch marks the culmination of a milestone year for Galileo and the GSA. The four new satellites will reinforce the provision of Galileo Initial Services, with additional satellites to be launched over the coming years until the constellation reaches full operational capability in 2020.

      GSA oversees LEOP

      For the first time, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is responsible for the Launch and Early Orbit Phase (LEOP) of this mission, overseeing Spaceopal - a joint venture between Telespazio and DLR-GfR - in their new role as Galileo Service Operator and LEOP Mission Director, and CNES as responsible for LEOP operations and Operations Director.

      Speaking at the launch event, GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides said: “Today’s successful launch is another positive step forward for Galileo and the GSA. The fact that leaders from five of the world’s major chipset and receiver manufacturers attended the launch for the first time is testament to the growing industry support and confidence being placed in Galileo and a realisation of what it has to offer the market.”

       

      The GSA-led Launch and Early Orbit Phase (LEOP) Team working in Toulouse on 12 December

      Successful teamwork

      The LEOP activities were overseen by a team of specialists from the GSA, Spaceopal and the operations team of the French Space Agency (CNES). LEOP operations were conducted from a dedicated control room in the CNES Centre Spatial de Toulouse, from which the team is overseeing all of the main LEOP stages.

      ”Following a precise injection from Ariane, the early operations phase began as planned. The GSA team, working together with SpaceOpal, CNES, ESA, and its contractors, is responsible for this phase.  Operations will be controlled from Kourou for the next couple weeks, after which command and control will be handed over to the Galileo Control Centres,” explained Rodrigo Da Costa, Galileo Services Programme Manager at the GSA. “It’s great to work with such a competent team of specialists to bring the new satellites into the constellation and deliver services to users worldwide,” he said.

      Galileo is Europe’s own global navigation satellite system, providing a highly accurate, guaranteed global positioning service under civilian control. Galileo is interoperable with GPS and Glonass, the US and Russian global satellite navigation systems. By offering dual frequencies as standard, Galileo is set to deliver real-time positioning accuracy down to the meter range.

      To keep track of Galileo-enabled devices serving a variety of needs as they become available, check out: USE.GALILEO.EU

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      New Galileo quartet successfully launched

      13.12.2017 16:06  
      Published: 
      13 December 2017

      Four new Galileo satellites were successfully launched on December 12 from the European spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana. This launch brings the Galileo constellation to a total of 22 satellites.

      Taking place on the 1st anniversary of the launch of Galileo Initial Services last December, and a week after the first Galileo User Assembly in Madrid, the successful launch marks the culmination of a milestone year for Galileo and the GSA. The four new satellites will reinforce the provision of Galileo Initial Services, with additional satellites to be launched over the coming years until the constellation reaches full operational capability in 2020.

      GSA oversees LEOP

      For the first time, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is responsible for the Launch and Early Orbit Phase (LEOP) of this mission, overseeing Spaceopal - a joint venture between Telespazio and DLR-GfR - in their new role as Galileo Service Operator and LEOP Mission Director, and CNES as responsible for LEOP operations and Operations Director.

      The LEOP is one of the most important phases of a space mission as it launches the spacecraft, puts it into the correct orbit, and gradually switches on and tests the first satellite elements. For a quadruple Ariane 5 launch such as Galileo Launch 9, this phase will take about 14 days.

      Speaking at the launch event, GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides said: “Today’s successful launch is another positive step forward for Galileo and the GSA. The fact that leaders from five of the world’s major chipset and receiver manufacturers attended the launch for the first time is testament to the growing industry support and confidence being placed in Galileo and a realisation of what it has to offer the market.”

      Successful teamwork

      The LEOP activities were overseen by a team of specialists from the GSA, Spaceopal and the operations team of the French Space Agency (CNES). LEOP operations were conducted from a dedicated control room in the CNES Centre Spatial de Toulouse, from which the team is overseeing all of the main LEOP stages.

      ”Following a precise injection from Ariane, the early operations phase began as planned. The GSA team, working together with SpaceOpal, CNES, ESA, and its contractors, is responsible for this phase.  Operations will be controlled from Kourou for the next couple weeks, after which command and control will be handed over to the Galileo Control Centres,” explained Rodrigo Da Costa, Galileo Services Programme Manager at the GSA. “It’s great to work with such a competent team of specialists to bring the new satellites into the constellation and deliver services to users worldwide,” he said.

      Galileo is Europe’s own global navigation satellite system, providing a highly accurate, guaranteed global positioning service under civilian control. Galileo is interoperable with GPS and Glonass, the US and Russian global satellite navigation systems. By offering dual frequencies as standard, Galileo is set to deliver real-time positioning accuracy down to the meter range.

      To keep track of Galileo-enabled devices serving a variety of needs as they become available, check out: USE.GALILEO.EU

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      The GSA-led Launch and Early Orbit Phase (LEOP) Team working in Toulouse on 12 December

      New Galileo quartet successfully launched

      13.12.2017 16:06  
      Published: 
      13 December 2017

      Four new Galileo satellites were successfully launched on December 12 from the European spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana. This launch brings the Galileo constellation to a total of 22 satellites.

      Taking place on the 1st anniversary of the launch of Galileo Initial Services last December, and a week after the first Galileo User Assembly in Madrid, the successful launch marks the culmination of a milestone year for Galileo and the GSA. The four new satellites will reinforce the provision of Galileo Initial Services, with additional satellites to be launched over the coming years until the constellation reaches full operational capability in 2020.

      GSA oversees LEOP

      For the first time, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is responsible for the Launch and Early Orbit Phase (LEOP) of this mission, overseeing Spaceopal - a joint venture between Telespazio and DLR-GfR - in their new role as Galileo Service Operator and LEOP Mission Director, and CNES as responsible for LEOP operations and Operations Director.

      The LEOP is one of the most important phases of a space mission as it launches the spacecraft, puts it into the correct orbit, and gradually switches on and tests the first satellite elements. For a quadruple Ariane 5 launch such as Galileo Launch 9, this phase will take about 14 days.

      Speaking at the launch event, GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides said: “Today’s successful launch is another positive step forward for Galileo and the GSA. The fact that leaders from five of the world’s major chipset and receiver manufacturers attended the launch for the first time is testament to the growing industry support and confidence being placed in Galileo and a realisation of what it has to offer the market.”

      The GSA-led Launch and Early Orbit Phase (LEOP) Team working in Toulouse on 12 December

      Successful teamwork

      The LEOP activities were overseen by a team of specialists from the GSA, Spaceopal and the operations team of the French Space Agency (CNES). LEOP operations were conducted from a dedicated control room in the CNES Centre Spatial de Toulouse, from which the team is overseeing all of the main LEOP stages.

      ”Following a precise injection from Ariane, the early operations phase began as planned. The GSA team, working together with SpaceOpal, CNES, ESA, and its contractors, is responsible for this phase.  Operations will be controlled from Kourou for the next couple weeks, after which command and control will be handed over to the Galileo Control Centres,” explained Rodrigo Da Costa, Galileo Services Programme Manager at the GSA. “It’s great to work with such a competent team of specialists to bring the new satellites into the constellation and deliver services to users worldwide,” he said.

      Galileo is Europe’s own global navigation satellite system, providing a highly accurate, guaranteed global positioning service under civilian control. Galileo is interoperable with GPS and Glonass, the US and Russian global satellite navigation systems. By offering dual frequencies as standard, Galileo is set to deliver real-time positioning accuracy down to the meter range.

      To keep track of Galileo-enabled devices serving a variety of needs as they become available, check out: USE.GALILEO.EU

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      GSA to play a role in Galileo satellite launch planned for Dec 12

      11.12.2017 10:06  
      Published: 
      11 December 2017

      Four Galileo satellites are to be launched on an Ariane 5 launcher from the Kourou Space Centre in French Guyana at 18:36 UTC (19:36 CET) on December 12. For the first time, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) will be responsible for the Launch and Early Orbit Phase (LEOP) of this mission (L9), overseeing Spaceopal GmbH in their new role as Galileo Service Operator.

      The LEOP is one of the most important phases of a space mission as it launches the spacecraft, puts it into the correct orbit, and gradually switches on and tests the first satellite elements. For a quadruple Ariane 5 launch such as Galileo Launch 9, this phase will take about 14 days, beginning a few hours before the launch and ending when the satellites are in a safe and pre-defined configuration for the execution of final drift orbit manoeuvres.

      The December 12 Galileo launch will be the second launch performed by an Ariane 5 and will bring the Galileo constellation to a total of 22 satellites launched so far: 4 in-orbit validation (IOV) satellites and 18 full operational capability (FOC) satellites. The LEOP falls within the remit of the GSA, following the handover to the Agency of responsibility for Galileo operations and service provision on July 1, 2017.

      Tightly-knit team

      The LEOP activities will be overseen by a tightly-knit team of specialists from the GSA, the mission director, and other experts from Spaceopal (a joint venture between DLR GfR mbH and Italy’s Telespazio S.p.A), and the operations team of the French Space Agency (CNES). This team brings a wealth of experience in areas such as mission control, on board systems, flight dynamics and telecommunications. The LEOP team will operate according to pre-defined procedures and mission rules and follow the escalation criteria defined in the Galileo Chain of Command.

      GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides said that in working with Spaceopal on the Galileo L9 mission, the GSA is helping to ensure that Galileo’s signal in space is translated into tangible services for users. “This launch will be an impressive accomplishment for the team, but Galileo is about more than manufacturing and launching satellites. The ultimate aim is to ensure that European citizens benefit from the services made possible by satellite technology,” he said.

      The LEOP operations are being conducted from a dedicated control room in the CNES Centre Spatial de Toulouse. An S-band link with the Galileo satellites is maintained by a network of TT&C stations distributed around the world. From this centre, the team will oversee all of the main LEOP stages.

      Soon after the satellite separates from the launch vehicle, an initialisation sequence is carried out by the On-Board Data Handling software to bring the satellite to a stable ‘breathing point’. This is the point at which the satellite’s attitude is stable and pointing towards the sun, and solar arrays are deployed to provide full power. At this point the satellite is thermally stable, ensuring adequate temperature ranges for all units, and has a stable link to the ground.

      The LEOP phase ends with the Command and Control Handover (C&C HO) of all 4 satellites from the LEOP Control Centre in Toulouse to the Galileo Control Centre (GCC-D) in Oberpfaffenhofen in Germany. The C&C HO follows a pre-defined and validated procedure with parallel operations from both centres and takes place while the spacecraft is in drift orbit in a selected pass, ensuring that both control centres will have adequate duration, visibility and access to the spacecraft to complete the hand-over. The hand-over takes place once the positioning manoeuvres have been completed and the final orbit has been determined, which will require approximately 2 measurement orbits after the last fine positioning manoeuvre.

      Galileo Service Operator

      The GSA awarded the Galileo Service Operator (GSOp) contract, with a value of up to EUR 1.5 billion, to Spaceopal at a special event in Brussels in December 2016, following a complex tendering process that started in January 2015.

      The contract awarded to Spaceopal includes:

      • Service provision of the Galileo Core System Operations, ILS and maintenance, including security monitoring from two mission control centres (GCC), located in Germany and Italy;
      • GNSS Service Centre (GSC) operations and maintenance for user support services in Spain;
      • Monitoring of system performance;
      • Support to system deployment and evolutions including the LEOP & IOT services;
      • Provision of Galileo Data Dissemination Network (GDDN) services;
      • Hosting and maintenance of remote sites distributed worldwide.

      For more information on the launch, click here.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      GSA will be responsible for the Launch and Early Orbit Phase (LEOP) of Galileo Launch 9

      GSA to play a major role in Galileo satellite launch planned for Dec 12

      11.12.2017 10:06  
      Published: 
      11 December 2017

      Four Galileo satellites are to be launched on an Ariane 5 launcher from the Guyana Space Centre in Kourou, French Guyana at 18:36 UTC (19:36 CET) on December 12. For the first time, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) will be responsible for the Launch and Early Orbit Phase (LEOP) of this mission (L9), overseeing Spaceopal GmbH in their new role as Galileo Service Operator.

      The LEOP is one of the most important phases of a space mission as it launches the spacecraft, puts it into the correct orbit, and gradually switches on and tests the first satellite elements. For a quadruple Ariane 5 launch such as Galileo Launch 9, this phase will take about 14 days, beginning a few hours after the launch and ending when the satellites are in a safe and pre-defined configuration for the execution of final drift orbit manoeuvres.

      The December 12 Galileo launch will be the second launch performed by an Ariane 5 and will bring the Galileo constellation to a total of 22 satellites launched so far: 4 in-orbit validation (IOV) satellites and 18 full operational capability (FOC) satellites. The LEOP falls within the remit of the GSA, following the handover to the Agency of responsibility for Galileo operations and service provision on July 1, 2017.

      Tightly-knit team

      The LEOP activities will be overseen by a tightly-knit team of specialists from the GSA, the mission director, and other experts from Spaceopal (a joint venture between DLR GfR mbH and Italy’s Telespazio S.p.A), and the operations director and specialists of the French Space Agency (CNES), supported by the Project Support Team. This team brings a wealth of experience in areas such as mission control, on board systems, flight dynamics, telecommunications and security. The LEOP team will operate according to pre-defined procedures and mission rules and follow the escalation criteria defined in the Galileo Chain of Command.

      GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides said that in working with Spaceopal on the Galileo L9 mission, the GSA is helping to ensure that Galileo’s signal in space is translated into tangible services for users. “This launch will be an impressive accomplishment for the team, but Galileo is about more than manufacturing and launching satellites. The ultimate aim is to ensure that European citizens benefit from the services made possible by satellite technology,” he said.

      The LEOP operations are being conducted from a dedicated control room in the CNES Centre Spatial de Toulouse. An S-band link with the Galileo satellites is maintained by a network of TT&C stations distributed around the world. From this centre, the team will oversee all of the main LEOP stages.

      Soon after the satellite separates from the launcher, an initialisation sequence is automatically triggered by the On-Board Data Handling software to bring the satellite to a stable ‘breathing point’. This is the point at which the satellite’s attitude is stable and pointing towards the sun, and solar arrays are deployed to provide full power. At this point the satellite is thermally stable, ensuring adequate temperature ranges for all units, and has a stable link to the ground.

      The LEOP phase ends with the Command and Control Handover (C&C HO) of all 4 satellites from the LEOP Control Centre in Toulouse to the Galileo Control Centre (GCC-D) in Oberpfaffenhofen in Germany. The C&C HO follows a pre-defined and validated procedure with parallel operations from both centres and takes place while the satellite is in drift orbit in a selected pass, ensuring that both control centres will have adequate duration, visibility and access to the satellite to complete the hand-over. The hand-over takes place once the positioning manoeuvres have been completed and the final orbit has been determined, which will require approximately 2 measurement orbits after the last fine positioning manoeuvre.

      Galileo Service Operator

      The GSA awarded the Galileo Service Operator (GSOp) contract, with a value of up to EUR 1.5 billion, to Spaceopal at a special event in Brussels in December 2016, following a complex tendering process that started in January 2015.

      The contract awarded to Spaceopal includes:

      • Service provision of the Galileo Core System Operations, ILS and maintenance, including security monitoring from two mission control centres (GCC), located in Germany and Italy;
      • GNSS Service Centre (GSC) operations and maintenance for user support services in Spain;
      • Monitoring of system performance;
      • Support to system deployment and evolutions including the LEOP & IOT services;
      • Provision of Galileo Data Dissemination Network (GDDN) services;
      • Hosting and maintenance of remote sites distributed worldwide.

      For more information on the launch, click here.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      GSA will be responsible for the Launch and Early Orbit Phase (LEOP) of Galileo Launch 9

      GSA to play a major role in Galileo satellite launch planned for Dec 12

      11.12.2017 10:06  
      Published: 
      11 December 2017

      Four Galileo satellites are to be launched on an Ariane 5 launcher from the Guyana Space Centre in Kourou, French Guyana at 18:36 UTC (19:36 CET) on December 12. For the first time, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) will be responsible for the Launch and Early Orbit Phase (LEOP) of this mission (L9), overseeing Spaceopal GmbH in their new role as Galileo Service Operator.

      The LEOP is one of the most important phases of a space mission as it launches the spacecraft, puts it into the correct orbit, and gradually switches on and tests the first satellite elements. For a quadruple Ariane 5 launch such as Galileo Launch 9, this phase will take about 14 days, beginning a few hours before the launch and ending when the satellites are in a safe and pre-defined configuration for the execution of final drift orbit manoeuvres.

      The December 12 Galileo launch will be the second launch performed by an Ariane 5 and will bring the Galileo constellation to a total of 22 satellites launched so far: 4 in-orbit validation (IOV) satellites and 18 full operational capability (FOC) satellites. The LEOP falls within the remit of the GSA, following the handover to the Agency of responsibility for Galileo operations and service provision on July 1, 2017.

      Tightly-knit team

      The LEOP activities will be overseen by a tightly-knit team of specialists from the GSA, the mission director, and other experts from Spaceopal (a joint venture between DLR GfR mbH and Italy’s Telespazio S.p.A), and the operations director and specialists of the French Space Agency (CNES), supported by the Project Support Team. This team brings a wealth of experience in areas such as mission control, on board systems, flight dynamics, telecommunications and security. The LEOP team will operate according to pre-defined procedures and mission rules and follow the escalation criteria defined in the Galileo Chain of Command.

      GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides said that in working with Spaceopal on the Galileo L9 mission, the GSA is helping to ensure that Galileo’s signal in space is translated into tangible services for users. “This launch will be an impressive accomplishment for the team, but Galileo is about more than manufacturing and launching satellites. The ultimate aim is to ensure that European citizens benefit from the services made possible by satellite technology,” he said.

      The LEOP operations are being conducted from a dedicated control room in the CNES Centre Spatial de Toulouse. An S-band link with the Galileo satellites is maintained by a network of TT&C stations distributed around the world. From this centre, the team will oversee all of the main LEOP stages.

      Soon after the satellite separates from the launcher, an initialisation sequence is automatically triggered by the On-Board Data Handling software to bring the satellite to a stable ‘breathing point’. This is the point at which the satellite’s attitude is stable and pointing towards the sun, and solar arrays are deployed to provide full power. At this point the satellite is thermally stable, ensuring adequate temperature ranges for all units, and has a stable link to the ground.

      The LEOP phase ends with the Command and Control Handover (C&C HO) of all 4 satellites from the LEOP Control Centre in Toulouse to the Galileo Control Centre (GCC-D) in Oberpfaffenhofen in Germany. The C&C HO follows a pre-defined and validated procedure with parallel operations from both centres and takes place while the satellite is in drift orbit in a selected pass, ensuring that both control centres will have adequate duration, visibility and access to the satellite to complete the hand-over. The hand-over takes place once the positioning manoeuvres have been completed and the final orbit has been determined, which will require approximately 2 measurement orbits after the last fine positioning manoeuvre.

      Galileo Service Operator

      The GSA awarded the Galileo Service Operator (GSOp) contract, with a value of up to EUR 1.5 billion, to Spaceopal at a special event in Brussels in December 2016, following a complex tendering process that started in January 2015.

      The contract awarded to Spaceopal includes:

      • Service provision of the Galileo Core System Operations, ILS and maintenance, including security monitoring from two mission control centres (GCC), located in Germany and Italy;
      • GNSS Service Centre (GSC) operations and maintenance for user support services in Spain;
      • Monitoring of system performance;
      • Support to system deployment and evolutions including the LEOP & IOT services;
      • Provision of Galileo Data Dissemination Network (GDDN) services;
      • Hosting and maintenance of remote sites distributed worldwide.

      For more information on the launch, click here.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      GSA will be responsible for the Launch and Early Orbit Phase (LEOP) of Galileo Launch 9

      Users now on the centre stage of Galileo’s future

      8.12.2017 10:21  
      Published: 
      08 December 2017

      Less than one year on from the launch of Galileo Initial Services (IS) in December 2016, the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) near Madrid was the venue for the very first Galileo User Assembly jointly organised by the European Commission and the European GNSS Agency (GSA). During this highly successful gathering of the Galileo community, the European GNSS User Consultation Platform (UCP) was officially launched to provide an open forum for users to discuss their needs, share experiences and provide feedback on the performance of European GNSS (EGNSS).

      The First Galileo User Assembly was held on 28 and 29 November at the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC). Established within the secure site of Spain’s INTA (Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial) close to Madrid, the GSC welcomed more than 200 of Galileo users and stakeholders from all market segments and involved institutions.

      In his opening speech Carlo des Dorides, Executive Director of the GSA, said the Assembly and the inauguration of the UCP marked a very special milestone for the Galileo programme: “The User Consultation Platform demonstrates the maturity of the programme,” he said before adding “Galileo is here and performing well.”

      The UCP was introduced by Gian-Gherardo Calini, Head of Market Development at the GSA. “The UCP will have very high value and importance for all users and the Galileo community as a whole – creating concrete benefits for all,” he said. “Galileo and EGNOS must work in a user driven environment and interaction with users is imperative for the success of the programmes.”

      The key concept of the UCP is to bring together as wide a range of users as possible in order to ensure that the community defines the strongest possible set of Position, Navigation, and Time (PNT) user requirements in their specific market segments. The UCP also allows users to share information on needs and market trends, and builds a strong and sustainable platform to exchange user perspectives.

      More information and material available here.

      Linking space to user needs

      “This will ensure that the GSA is truly fulfilling its mission to link space to user needs,” Calini concluded.

      Fiammetta Diani of the GSA introduced the main working sessions of the UCP. She described how the Galileo User Requirements documentation is intended to serve as a reference for E-GNSS developments, emphasising that these were “living, dynamic documents”.

      The main work of the UCP took place through nine parallel workshop sessions grouping users by market segment. The transport sector was split into four segments: Rail, Road, Maritime and Aviation. Professional and High Precision users were divided in three sessions: Agriculture, Surveying and Timing. In addition, one large group was convened for Mass Market and consumer applications and a specific session discussed issues around Research and Development.

      Each session was given a set of tasks to complete and nominated a chairperson or spokesperson to report back to a final plenary session.

      The topics tackled by each group included discussing and validating the user requirements for their market area or thematic topic, providing inputs to enhance EGNSS services both in general and specifically in their area, providing feedback on GSC user support, and identifying specific R&D priorities by market segment.

      User input

      On the afternoon of 29 November, the nominated chairs reported back on the conclusions from the nine thematic sessions providing a substantial amount of ideas and input for the GSA team to work with.

      Three panellists - Gian Gherardo Calini and Aitor Alvarez Rodriguez, GSC Coordinator, for GSA and María de las Flores Diaz Pulido for the European Commission commented on the presentations. At the end of the session each panellist was presented with a CD containing the User Requirements Documents.

      All feedback will be considered and was recorded in comprehensive minutes of the meeting for all nine thematic sessions. The minutes will be distributed to the participants at the UCP along with the full set of presentations delivered at the event.

      This information will feed a review of the EGNSS User Requirements Documents that will be shared widely during Q1 of 2018. At the 2018 UCP the GSA will report back on the implementation status of all the agreed actions.

      Concluding the final session Justyna Redelkiewicz Musial from the GSA accurately commented that the atmosphere of the first UCP was that of a true family gathering. “This is just the start of the dialogue,” she said. “We can improve, and we look forward to the second UCP in 2018 with even more users and the wider community.”

      This first UCP was clearly a success with all participants contributing in a truly collaborative and enthusiastic manner to ensure Galileo and other EGNSS can deliver substantial benefits and opportunities to society.

      See you in 2018!

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      The 1st Galileo User Assembly was opened by GSA Exec Director Carlo des Dorides

      GSC showcased at First Galileo User Assembly

      7.12.2017 8:40  
      GSC premises in Madrid
      Published: 
      07 December 2017

      On 28 and 29 November the First Galileo User Assembly was jointly hosted by the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) based within Spain’s Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial (INTA) just outside Madrid. As the main interface for European GNSS and its users the GSC featured heavily in the Assembly with briefings on its performance and future service plans. Assembly participants also had the opportunity to visit the main operations centre within this secure facility.

      On the evening of the 28 November a reception for Assembly participants was held at the GSC where Matthias Petschke, Director of EU Satellite Navigation Programmes, European Commission said: “Today Galileo is coming home.”

      The full name of the GSC building is the Loyola de Palacio Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Service Centre and is named in memory of the Spanish Commissioner and Vice President of the European Commission who was a strong supporter of Galileo in its early years.

      “Her vision of Galileo has now become a reality,” he continued.  “GSC is a great place to work and a great place for Galileo’s first user platform less than one year after the declaration of Initial Services.”

      Carlo des Dorides, Executive Director, European GNSS Agency (GSA) agreed saying: “It is not by chance that we are holding the first user forum here. The GSC is core to future client service. The GSC is the entry door to the system for Galileo users with the number of registered users substantially increasing every year.”

      GSC is working to implement the next version of the real-time system interface, which will be the first step towards the provision of the Galileo Commercial Service and the Open Service signal authentication, he continued.

      Carmen Librero Pintado, Spanish Secretary of State for Transport said that “Spain has always supported the EGNOS and Galileo programmes” and looked forward to continuing cooperation as the implementation and exploitation of the system grows.

      Jean-Yves Le Gall, Chairman of the GSA Administrative Board and President of the French Space Agency (CNES) concluded the speeches saying the performance of Galileo since the launch of Initial Services had proved that it had been the right decision. “We are entering a new era for Galileo – the exploitation phase,” he said praising the advances made over the past year.

      More information and material available here.

      Window on GSC

      During the reception, User Assembly participants were able to take a short tour of the GSC and learn about its operation and services.

      The GSC aims to be the centre of the user community and is the single user interface for the Open Service and Commercial Service. In addition, it supports Safety of Life applications and is home to the Search and Rescue (SAR) service server.

      Visitors were told that GSC wants to fully understand all user needs across the full spectrum of Galileo application domains to ensure it can provide the most appropriate service and products for users.

      A key current initiative is to define advanced product needs for Galileo. This process should be as open as possible to ensure that the best global Galileo products are provided.

      Watch this: The Galileo Integrated Logistics Support Centre opens in Transinnes, Belgium

      One stop shop

      The visit and briefing were followed up with a presentation from Aitor Alvarez, GSC Manager for the GSA during the User Assembly sessions on 29 November.

      “Galileo was specifically designed for civilian purposes, so a user focus is a key element of its operation – and the GSC is the centre of this focus,” he said. “But this was a bidirectional interface that needs and promotes feedback with its users.”

      He described GSC as a “One stop shop for Galileo public information status, performance, documentation and help desk support to developers”. The main Galileo user interface was the website and the number of users and sessions visitors were increasing year on year. He hoped to reach 1000 registered users before the first anniversary of initial services.

      The GSC provides continuous updates on the Galileo system status including NAGUs (Notice Advisory to Galileo Users) that can be subscribed to via email.

      The GSC helpdesk responds to increasing numbers of questions, mainly on technical issues, each year and monitors user incident reports. “For independent monitoring – having millions of users is the best solution,” said Alvarez. Most reported incidents were due to ‘local effects’ rather than any issues with the system, he remarked.

      “Galileo is constantly evolving,” concluded Alvarez. “And GSC is evolving to support Open Service and Commercial Service implementation plans, to satisfy user needs, cope with new functions and to disseminate extra data as a means to provide users with additional information.”

      Earlier Manuela Rossi from Spaceopal the contracted Galileo Service Operator at GSC talked about the service delivery experience at GSC. “The focus was very much on service delivery with an emphasis on service performance improvement,” she said.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      GSC premises in Madrid

      Are you an EGNOS user? We want to hear from you!

      6.12.2017 13:13  
      Published: 
      06 December 2017

      With the 2017 EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) aims to gain a clearer picture of the requirements of EGNOS users so it can improve EGNOS service delivery.

      The GSA, along with the European Satellite Services Provider (ESSP), has launched the 2017 edition of its EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey. In conducting this survey, the GSA and ESSP aim to gain a better understanding of EGNOS’ value to users, with a view to providing better customer service.

      The survey will be open to EGNOS users until December 15 and only takes a few moments to complete.

      You can access the survey here.

      The survey covers all market segments and services, including the Open Service, the Safety of Life Service and the EGNOS Data Access Service (EDAS). It also assesses the ESSP’s management of EGNOS User Support Services. All EGNOS users are strongly encouraged to participate, regardless of the market segment in which they operate.

      The 2016 EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey showed a positive trend, with user satisfaction increased substantially compared with 2015. These results will be presented in full at the EGNOS Workshop, which is to be held in Athens, Greece, on 3-4 October, 2017.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      The GSA uses feedback from users to improve EGNOS service delivery. Deadline extended: December 15.

      GSA talks EGNOS with Geospatial World Magazine

      29.11.2017 9:51  
      Published: 
      29 November 2017

      In a recent article published by Geospatial World, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) discusses how the EGNOS Open Service and the EGNOS Data Access Service (EDAS) help provide users with improved location performance.

      Location plays an important role in many of our day-to-day activities. “Every day we need to locate various points, such as places, businesses, customers and resources,” says GSA Market Development Officer and article author Reinhard Blasi. “Maps are the means we use to place these points into a geographic context, and to create maps, these points need to be positioned.”

      In Europe, the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service (EGNOS) helps locate these points with sub-meter accuracy in an easy, affordable and flexible way and in real time. It can also boost the data capture, which is usually the most time-consuming process in the development of a mapping or GIS application.

      EGNOS was designed to improve GPS performance in Europe. “The EGNOS Open Service provides this improved performance to users of general-purpose applications,” says Blasi. “It is freely accessible through a GPS/SBAS compatible receiver within the area of coverage, and no specific authorisation is required.”

      The EGNOS Data Access Service (EDAS), on the other hand, is EGNOS’ internet-based service. It provides free-of-charge access to all the data generated and collected by the EGNOS infrastructure. EDAS gathers all the raw data coming from the GPS, GLONASS and EGNOS GEO satellites collected by all the receivers located at the EGNOS stations, which are mainly distributed over Europe and North Africa. Once the data is received, EDAS disseminates it over the internet in real time and through an FTP archive, resulting in the different services, depending on the protocol and format used and the type of information available to users.

      “With EDAS, users equipped with compatible software applications and/or GNSS receivers and having access to the internet can obtain improved accuracy with respect to GPS standalone by implementing advanced positioning techniques,” says Blasi in the article.

      This is an excerpt from the 1 September 2017 article entitled European SBAS: EGNOS offers free sub-metre accuracy in Europe published by Geospatial World. You can read the full article here.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      This figure shows the typical accuracy one can achieve with EGNOS.

      Galileo-enabled RTK network brings clear benefits to surveyors

      27.11.2017 8:36  
      Published: 
      27 November 2017

      Now that surveyors worldwide are able to use Galileo positioning, following the declaration of Galileo Initial Services, all major Precise Point Positioning (PPP) providers in Europe have upgraded to Galileo and more than 50% of real time kinematic (RTK) network providers have already upgraded or have started to upgrade.

      At the latest Council of European Geodetic Surveyors (CLGE) General Assembly, which was held in Potsdam in Germany on 29 September 2017, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) organised the second edition of the workshop “Integrating Galileo in RTK networks: success stories and open challenges”, at which industry representatives shared their experience and results received from Galileo performance testing.

      At the event, Roberto Capua from Italian public augmentation service provider Sogei and Paul Chambon from French private RTK service provider Terria spoke about the technicalities, challenges and benefits of Galileo inclusion into RTK networks. The two service providers noted in particular that field tests had shown the benefits of Galileo inclusion into the RTK networks.

      “The results confirm the usability of the Galileo constellation in high-precision RTK applications and show improved availability, reliability, accuracy and time-to-fix in difficult measuring environments such as urban canyons and under tree canopies,” they said.

      New markets, new chipsets

      Both service providers highlighted that there are new emerging markets for high precision services, especially in the mass market domain. One such promising sector is autonomous driving, which is slowly becoming a reality due to enhanced positioning systems and the evolution of augmentation services (RTK, PPP, PPP/RTK, etc.).

      Capua also underlined the availability of new dual-frequency mass market chipsets using L1/L5 frequencies, which will allow increased positioning accuracy with mass market devices such as smartphones, tablets, wearables. “With E5/L5 capability added to the E1/L1, chipsets and receivers benefit from better accuracy, ionosphere error cancellation, improved code tracking pseudorange estimates, and faster transition from code tracking to phase tracking, among other benefits,” he said.

      GSA questionnaire

      During the workshop, the GSA also launched a real-time questionnaire that aimed to gain a better understanding of Galileo’s value to end-users, the needs of surveyors and reference network providers, the level of Galileo adoption and challenges users may face when upgrading to Galileo.

      The survey showed that end-users have a good understanding of Galileo’s added value, with 69% of the respondents declaring that are convinced that Galileo will improve their work. On the other hand, the survey confirmed there is still an issue with inter-operability between the different brands of RX manufacturers within the RTK-network and that the inclusion of Galileo into the RTK network is expensive.

      1st Galileo User Assembly

      Information received from the Galileo questionnaire will feed into the discussion at the 1st Galileo User Assembly, which is set to take place next week (28-29 November). Hosted by the GSC at its premises in Madrid, the Assembly will give Galileo users the opportunity to discuss their needs, share their experience, and provide feedback on Galileo performance.

      The Assembly will include:

      • A Galileo User Consultation Platform (UCP) in 4 thematic groups (transport, mass market, professional and R&D);
      • A general update on the Galileo programme;
      • Presentations on Galileo Initial Services performance, the Galileo Services Roadmap and the Galileo User Interfaces; and
      • A Galileo User Satisfaction Survey.

       

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      All major PPP providers and most RTK providers in Europe have already upgraded or have started to upgrade to Galileo

      Galileo-enabled RTK network brings clear benefits to surveyors

      27.11.2017 8:36  
      Published: 
      27 November 2017

      Now that surveyors worldwide are able to use Galileo positioning, following the declaration of Galileo Initial Services, all major Precise Point Positioning (PPP) providers in Europe have upgraded to Galileo and more than 50% of real time kinematic (RTK) network providers have already upgraded or have started to upgrade.

      At the latest Council of European Geodetic Surveyors (CLGE) General Assembly, which was held in Potsdam in Germany on 29 September 2017, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) organised the second edition of the workshop “Integrating Galileo in RTK networks: success stories and open challenges”, at which industry representatives shared their experience and results received from Galileo performance testing.

      At the event, Roberto Capua from Italian public augmentation service provider Sogei and Paul Chambon from French private RTK service provider Terria spoke about the technicalities, challenges and benefits of Galileo inclusion into RTK networks. The two service providers noted in particular that field tests had shown the benefits of Galileo inclusion into the RTK networks.

      “The results confirm the usability of the Galileo constellation in high-precision RTK applications and show improved availability, reliability, accuracy and time-to-fix in difficult measuring environments such as urban canyons and under tree canopies,” they said.

      New markets, new chipsets

      Both service providers highlighted that there are new emerging markets for high precision services, especially in the mass market domain. One such promising sector is autonomous driving, which is slowly becoming a reality due to enhanced positioning systems and the evolution of augmentation services (RTK, PPP, PPP/RTK, etc.).

      Capua also underlined the availability of new dual-frequency mass market chipsets using L1/L5 frequencies, which will allow increased positioning accuracy with mass market devices such as smartphones, tablets, wearables. “With E5/L5 capability added to the E1/L1, chipsets and receivers benefit from better accuracy, ionosphere error cancellation, improved code tracking pseudorange estimates, and faster transition from code tracking to phase tracking, among other benefits,” he said.

      GSA questionnaire

      During the workshop, the GSA also launched a real-time questionnaire that aimed to gain a better understanding of Galileo’s value to end-users, the needs of surveyors and reference network providers, the level of Galileo adoption and challenges users may face when upgrading to Galileo.

      The survey showed that end-users have a good understanding of Galileo’s added value, with 69% of the respondents declaring that are convinced that Galileo will improve their work. On the other hand, the survey confirmed there is still an issue with inter-operability between the different brands of RX manufacturers within the RTK-network and that the inclusion of Galileo into the RTK network is expensive.

      1st Galileo User Assembly

      Information received from the Galileo questionnaire will feed into the discussion at the 1st Galileo User Assembly, which is set to take place next week (28-29 November). Hosted by the GSC at its premises in Madrid, the Assembly will give Galileo users the opportunity to discuss their needs, share their experience, and provide feedback on Galileo performance.

      The Assembly will include:

      • A Galileo User Consultation Platform (UCP) in 4 thematic groups (transport, mass market, professional and R&D);
      • A general update on the Galileo programme;
      • Presentations on Galileo Initial Services performance, the Galileo Services Roadmap and the Galileo User Interfaces; and
      • A Galileo User Satisfaction Survey.

       

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      All major PPP providers and most RTK providers in Europe have already upgraded or have started to upgrade to Galileo

      JOHAN Sports set to go global

      23.11.2017 11:03  
      Published: 
      23 November 2017

      Last time we checked in with the JOHAN project, the team was finalising the final testing phase. Just a couple years later, they’re on the verge of going global.

      Winner of the GSA Special Prize at the 2013 European Satellite Navigation Competition (ESNC), JOHAN Sports develops motion sensors for location determination and performance measurement of team athletes, especially football and hockey players.

      “JOHAN Sports provides data-driven insights and advice to teams, trainers and players to improve performance and prevent injuries,” explains founder Robin van Kappel. “With JOHAN, you can see who is training too hard and who has a higher chance of injury, as well as who is strong in which performance aspects, such as endurance, sprint, agility and recovery.”

      The wearable motion sensors are integrated with heart rate and recovery forms and an online platform based on data science, sports science and customer needs. The GNSS tracker – which is Galileo capable – can determine positioning up to 1.5 metres of a player’s location. By combining this data with measurements from inertial sensors, accuracy becomes even higher.

      After each use, players and coaches can monitor workload, performance, tactical information and event analysis, allowing players to spot weaknesses and improve their game over time. Coaches can also use the analysis to better capitalise on certain players’ strengths to the team’s advantage. “The measured data is visualised online via a personalised analysis environment for coaches and players that is backed by live support,” adds van Kappel.

      According to van Kappel, JOHAN stands apart from the competition in that it offers a user-friendly and affordable performance analysis system for mid-market sports teams. “Targeting professional and semi-professional teams with relatively small and non-specialised staff, our solution is easy to use and every level of trainer can understand it – which differentiates us from the competition,” he says. “By continuously investing in the research and development of the online platform, we are able to offer state-of-the-art but practical products.”

      Growth mode

      Since final testing was completed in 2015, the project has been busy. Its team has grown from two to 12. The GSA prize provided finance for JOHAN incubation at any incubation centre, and the project decided to cooperate with the European Space Agency’s (ESA) Business Innovation Centre in Noordwijk. Working from this centre, the company has been ramping up development, adding customers and raising funds. For example, in April 2016 they raised EUR 150,000 in investment to start production work towards the product’s official commercial launch in the Netherlands. In May of this year, the company secured an additional EUR 650,000 in capital, which has been earmarked for scaling up sales, expanding the organisation and launching new hardware.

      According to van Kappel, the sports market is growing rapidly (see table, below), making the potential market for JOHAN huge and largely untapped. “Sports are becoming more scientific, meaning that more scientific staff are involved and the approach and methodologies are becoming increasingly based on validated sports science,” he says. “Furthermore, broadcasting media are becoming more stats-based, which requires more and more technologies like JOHAN that can monitor players.” 

        Current Value CAGR Value in 2020
      Sports Wearable Tech1  $3.8bln  20% (even 40% for the European market)  $6bln
       Sports Analytics2  $350mln  68%  $4.7bln

      With team solutions starting from EUR 400 per month, today JOHAN is already used by 30 sports teams, including PEC Zwolle (Eredivisie), NEC (First division), Feyenoord Academy, SD Feirense (Primeira Liga Portugal) and the Royal Dutch Hockey Association. However, in order to grow, the company knows it must look further afield, both to the European and US markets. “The US market is important to us because the value of sports there is very high, with lots of colleges, universities and professional sport clubs having high revenues and budgets,” says van Kappel.

      To serve this market, JOHAN’s current products are completely English based, scalable, ready for rapid growth and are usable by everybody on the team – including trainers, players, staff and even directors. “This technology is now easily adoptable by ambitious teams searching for a competitive edge,” adds van Kappel. “As technology and sports are very much embraced in the US, it is a very attractive market for JOHAN.”

      To continue to capitalise on these market opportunities, this year JOHAN is launching its next generation system, which will feature real-time analysis, almost full autonomy and automatic data analysis provided by machine learning technology. Players and trainers can use dedicated mobile apps for continuous interaction with the system, both on the field, between training and matches and at home. Furthermore, the system’s compatibility with third party products makes integration with video, heart rate monitoring and tactical tools even richer.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      JOHAN’s GNSS trackers – which are Galileo capable – can determine positioning up to 1.5 metres of a player’s location.

      Taking stock of Commercial Space Applications, between Transformation, Fusion and Competition

      22.11.2017 11:08  
      Published: 
      22 November 2017

      The European GNSS Agency (GSA) recently sponsored the 23rd Ka and Broadband Communications Conference and the 35th AIAA International Communications Satellite Systems Conference (ICSSC), two of the most influential technical conferences on satellite systems, which were held jointly in Trieste, Italy, on 16-19 October 2017.

      Under the theme Commercial Space Applications: Transformation, Fusion and Competition, participants examined the competitive market transformations arising from the development of new low Earth orbit (LEO) systems and small satellites, in addition to stratospheric platforms and geostationary (GEO) systems, among other technological developments.

      This rapid technological revolution and the resulting large scale integration of services are driving a major transformation in satellite systems. The attendees examined these developments, discussed new uses of the technologies, and explored the economic, marketing, technical and regulatory issues that need to be addressed for the technological developments to reach their full potential.

      Technological advances to change how people live

      At the conference, GSA Head of Market Development Gian-Gherardo Calini participated in a panel discussion on New Markets Emerging from Aviation and Autonomy, in which the participants discussed how new uses of airspace coupled with recent advances in autonomy will change how people live and work. It was noted, moreover, that the enormous amount of research taking place in autonomy, and its use in self-driving cars and drone operations, would result in exciting new opportunities for satellite technology.

      Calini also chaired a thematic session on Navigation Systems and Applications, which he closed by pointing out the economic, marketing, technical and regulatory challenges that need to be overcome.

      Next year’s joint conference - the 24th Ka and Broadband Communications Conference and the 36th AIAA International Communications Satellite Systems Conference - will be held in Niagara Falls, Canada, on 15-18 October 2018.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      Participants in the conference examined the market potential of new satellite technology developments

      Uniting space technologies, developers and ideas

      21.11.2017 11:53  
      Published: 
      21 November 2017

      The SpaceTech2017 Hackathon, part of Estonian Space Week, challenged hardware and software developers to utilise the synergies between Galileo and Copernicus to create innovative applications.

      Although Galileo and Copernicus serve different functions – with Galileo being a GNSS system and Copernicus an Earth Observation system – there are a number of important synergies between the two. The challenge, however, is developing innovative applications that make full use of these synergies – which was the exact challenge presented to the teams competing at the SpaceTech2017 Hackathon in Tartu, Estonia.

      “The idea behind the Hackathon is to bring together software and hardware developers and provide them the opportunity to combine the unprecedented volume of data made available by Galileo and Copernicus,” says Paul Liias, Expert in Space Technologies at the Economic Development Department of Estonia’s Ministry of Economic Affairs and Communications, who hosted the event as part of European Space Week.

      Organised by Estonian event planning company Garage48 and with the support of the GSA and the European Space Agency (ESA), the hackathon brought together 122 developers, engineers, data scientists, designers and marketers from 23 different countries – including India, the Middle East, Europe and the US. The ESA provided participants with an API containing access to Copernicus data, while the GSA provided Galileo-enabled hardware featuring GNSS raw measurements, and access to a set of location APIs through Here Technologies - its partner for the event.

      “We were happy to be able to bring together the GSA and ESA – two of the biggest players in space technology – to one hackathon,” says Garage48’s Kai Isand. “As a result, participants not only had access to Galileo and Copernicus data, but also top-notch mentors from each organisation who supported the teams during the event.”

      Winning ideas

      Each team was challenged to come up with exciting ideas using different elements from different streams to create integrated solutions – all within just 48 hours. Applications were judged based on their level of innovation and creativity, use of space technology and data, level of teamwork, business potential and vision for the future.

      The winner of the GSA prize, which was awarded to Location Based Services (LBS) and Geo-IoT applications, was the Run Me If You Can game. The fun social fitness app lets runners interact and compete in real time with other runners from around the world. Matched runners race equal distances, crossing geo-placed checkpoints, and the first one back is declared the winner.

      “The Hackathon was a great opportunity to learn more about the huge amount of data made available to developers through Copernicus and the incredible accuracy of Galileo positioning,” says Run Me If You Can team leader Francesco Renzi. “I think the ideas created at this event are just the tip of the iceberg, and that there are lots of yet-to-be-thought of real-world applications that will soon benefit from these European space technologies.” 

      The overall winning idea came from the iDoBalloon team, who built an educational DIY High Altitude Balloon Kit. The balloon, which can be sent to the stratosphere, will provide science students with a unique point of view and a one-of-a-kind learning opportunity. “The whole process was a big challenge for our team – one filled with a lot of emotions and very little sleep,” says iDoBalloon team leader. “But thanks in large part to the on-site mentors and the support we received from the event organisers, we were able to reach our goal by the end of the hackathon.”

      Taking home the prize for best GNSS/Copernicus integration was TeamONGrid and their application for tracking military endurance competitions using Military Grid Reference System (MGRS) maps. The app lets teams easily share location data with their support detail, designate upcoming team service points, and use digital breadcrumbs to simplify navigation on paper-based MGRS maps. TeamONGrid was also the overall runner up and the runner up on the GSA Prize.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      The SpaceTech2017 Integrated Applications Hackathon brought together 122 developers, engineers, data scientists, designers and marketers from 23 different.

      GSA management systems better than ever

      20.11.2017 11:20  
      Published: 
      20 November 2017

      The European GNSS Agency (GSA) has successfully qualified its ISO 9001: 2015-compliant management system as part of this year's re-certification audit. The audit revealed that quality management processes at the agency have improved as a result of being adapted and developed since the previous audit.

      In this year’s recertification audit, the Lloyds Register (LRQA) auditors paid particular attention to the effectiveness of the GSA quality management system, and found that there were no deviations from the requirements of the standard.

      Commenting on the audit results, GSA Executive Director Carlo Des Dorides said that ISO certification, complemented by ECSS (European Cooperation for Space Standardisation) and ITIL best practices for IT service management,   was not only important proof of the agency’s services, processes and customer orientation, but also evidence that the GSA is ready to implement operations in a sustainable manner. “In this respect, we are very happy about the confirmation of the certificate, also against the background of GSA now being the Galileo service provider," he said.

      Appreciation of new tools and processes

      During the re-certification, the GSA performed well and fulfilled all the criteria. As a special strength, it was emphasised that that GSA had been able to further improve its definition of operational processes. The audit also found that the GSA implements risk management at best practice levels and has developed an agency-wide work breakdown structure.

      "The successful ISO 9001 re-certification is good news for GSA, as we have worked hard in the past few months to adapt our quality management to the role of being a service operator," said Patrick Hamilton, Head of the Project Control Department. "The fact that the audit has confirmed this so positively confirms our efforts and is also an incentive to continually evaluate and optimise our services and processes."

      About ISO 9001

      The International Standards Organisation (ISO) is a worldwide federation of national standards bodies (ISO member bodies). The work of preparing International Standards is carried out through ISO technical committees, in liaison with international organisations, governmental and non-governmental bodies.

      The ISO 9001 certification is the most widely used and most important standard in quality management at national and international level. It sets standards that ensure transparency of operational procedures and increase customer satisfaction, as well as ensuring optimal operational structures. After a re-certification, the certification is valid for three years, but is checked annually in the context of so-called monitoring audits.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      The ISO 9001 audit found that adapting and further developing existing processes has improved the GSA quality management system.

      GSA management systems better than ever

      20.11.2017 11:20  
      The ISO 9001 audit found that adapting and further developing existing processes has improved the GSA quality management system.
      Published: 
      20 November 2017

      The European GNSS Agency (GSA) has successfully qualified its ISO 9001: 2015-compliant management system as part of this year's re-certification audit. The audit revealed that quality management processes at the agency have improved as a result of being adapted and developed since the previous audit.

      In this year’s recertification audit, the Lloyds Register (LRQA) auditors paid particular attention to the effectiveness of the GSA quality management system, and found that there were no deviations from the requirements of the standard.

      Commenting on the audit results, GSA Executive Director Carlo Des Dorides said that ISO certification, complemented by ECSS (European Cooperation for Space Standardisation) and ITIL best practices for IT service management,   was not only important proof of the agency’s services, processes and customer orientation, but also evidence that the GSA is ready to implement operations in a sustainable manner. “In this respect, we are very happy about the confirmation of the certificate, also against the background of GSA now being the Galileo service provider," he said.

      Appreciation of new tools and processes

      During the re-certification, the GSA performed well and fulfilled all the criteria. As a special strength, it was emphasised that that GSA had been able to further improve its definition of operational processes. The audit also found that the GSA implements risk management at best practice levels and has developed an agency-wide work breakdown structure.

      "The successful ISO 9001 re-certification is good news for GSA, as we have worked hard in the past few months to adapt our quality management to the role of being a service operator," said Patrick Hamilton, Head of the Project Control Department. "The fact that the audit has confirmed this so positively confirms our efforts and is also an incentive to continually evaluate and optimise our services and processes."

      About ISO 9001

      The International Standards Organisation (ISO) is a worldwide federation of national standards bodies (ISO member bodies). The work of preparing International Standards is carried out through ISO technical committees, in liaison with international organisations, governmental and non-governmental bodies.

      The ISO 9001 certification is the most widely used and most important standard in quality management at national and international level. It sets standards that ensure transparency of operational procedures and increase customer satisfaction, as well as ensuring optimal operational structures. After a re-certification, the certification is valid for three years, but is checked annually in the context of so-called monitoring audits.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      The ISO 9001 audit found that adapting and further developing existing processes has improved the GSA quality management system.

      GSA management systems better than ever

      20.11.2017 11:20  
      Published: 
      20 November 2017

      The European GNSS Agency (GSA) has successfully qualified its ISO 9001: 2015-compliant management system as part of this year's re-certification audit. The audit revealed that quality management processes at the agency have improved as a result of being adapted and developed since the previous audit.

      In this year’s recertification audit, the Lloyds Register (LRQA) auditors paid particular attention to the effectiveness of the GSA quality management system, and found that there were no deviations from the requirements of the standard.

      Commenting on the audit results, GSA Executive Director Carlo Des Dorides said that ISO certification, complemented by ECSS (European Cooperation for Space Standardisation) and ITIL best practices for IT service management,   was not only important proof of the agency’s services, processes and customer orientation, but also evidence that the GSA is ready to implement operations in a sustainable manner. “In this respect, we are very happy about the confirmation of the certificate, also against the background of GSA now being the Galileo service provider," he said.

      Appreciation of new tools and processes

      During the re-certification, the GSA performed well and fulfilled all the criteria. As a special strength, it was emphasised that that GSA had been able to further improve its definition of operational processes. The audit also found that the GSA implements risk management at best practice levels and has developed an agency-wide work breakdown structure.

      "The successful ISO 9001 re-certification is good news for GSA, as we have worked hard in the past few months to adapt our quality management to the role of being a service operator," said Patrick Hamilton, Head of the Project Control Department. "The fact that the audit has confirmed this so positively confirms our efforts and is also an incentive to continually evaluate and optimise our services and processes."

      About ISO 9001

      The International Standards Organisation (ISO) is a worldwide federation of national standards bodies (ISO member bodies). The work of preparing International Standards is carried out through ISO technical committees, in liaison with international organisations, governmental and non-governmental bodies.

      The ISO 9001 certification is the most widely used and most important standard in quality management at national and international level. It sets standards that ensure transparency of operational procedures and increase customer satisfaction, as well as ensuring optimal operational structures. After a re-certification, the certification is valid for three years, but is checked annually in the context of so-called monitoring audits.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      The ISO 9001 audit found that adapting and further developing existing processes has improved the GSA quality management system.

      Central role for robust GNSS in autonomous driving

      17.11.2017 10:31  
      Published: 
      17 November 2017

      Scientists and researchers participating at the final event of the EU-funded SaPPART COST Action ('Satellite Positioning Performance Assessment for Road Transport') discussed the potential of GNSS to deliver necessary high-integrity and high-precision positioning capabilities for autonomous road vehicles. A robust centralised on-board GNSS unit could deliver the requisite levels of performance for a variety of in-vehicle applications.

      Ifsttar's François Peyret, who served as Chairman of SaPPART, opened the event organised jointly with ERTICO, laying out a core emerging premise for autonomous road transport: "These automatic driving cars will definitely need absolute positioning. They will need a kind of 'box', a GNSS technology, that will provide you with your positioning, with all the required performances. And this will then be hybridised with other kinds of sensors."

      SaPPART has been described by organisers as a framework for trans-national cooperation among European researchers, engineers and scholars working in the GNSS and ITS domains, with the common goal of defining requirements for positioning integrity in the road sector. Key areas of interest have included the standardisation and certification of vehicle positioning technologies, the attainment of which is expected to accelerate the uptake of GNSS-based ITS and mobility applications.

      SaPPART Science officer Pierre-Yves Gilliéron said, "Positioning is playing a key role for many road and ITS applications such as road user charging. "Our COST Action has been a fantastic tool," he added, "a framework that has been very useful in gathering together researchers and scientists. With SaPPART we have created an international network where we can share knowledge and ideas."

      The real challenge, Gilliéron said, was to get the diverse GNSS and ITS communities on the same page, all speaking the same language and understanding each other’s needs. "We received funding for four years and in that time we were able to come closer together and develop a number of clear ideas for common research."

      In terms of concrete deliverables, SaPPART has already issued some key reference documents, including a White Paper outlining the basics of GNSS for the ITS audience, as well as a more technically detailed SaPPART Handbook.

      "We collected real data sets, carried out testing on-board vehicles, including different GNSS receivers and high-end equipment," said Gilliéron. "In addition to our other publications, the White Paper and the Handbook, a set of Guidelines is now also under preparation on how to assess the quality of positioning in different contexts and for different applications. Those Guidelines will be available by the end of this year."

      One thing all seem to be in agreement about – the deployment of autonomous vehicles will soon become a reality on European road networks, and most driving-related decisions will be based, one way or another, on the location of the vehicle and of other vehicles and objects in its vicinity. So vehicle location and positioning will be a critical component for the effective transportation of people and goods by self-driving road vehicles. That positioning will be enabled mainly by GNSS technologies, including Europe’s Galileo, which is expected to offer significant benefits in terms of accuracy and authentication compared to the other satellite-based navigation systems.

      View of the European GNSS Agency

      "We believe that GNSS is a core technology," said GSA officer Alberto Fernández-Wyttenbach. "It will have to be complimented with other technologies in order to get to the integrity level that we need in 100% of environmental situations, but we also believe GNSS can do more than just navigation. We expect to use it in a very robust way to enable or compliment many other applications."

      Fernández said the GSA sees GNSS as an 'engine' for a range of uses within a vehicle: "In commercial vehicles, for example, today there are many applications for which the use of GNSS is particularly relevant."

      He also referenced the GNSS-driven smart tachograph, with its enhanced security features, which allows users to pinpoint the geographic location of the vehicle, making compliance easier for operators and facilitating targeted enforcement by authorities throughout the EU.

      "We see the convergence with road tolling and fleet management systems that are designed to control the deployment of trucks," Fernández said. "Now instead of having a separate GNSS unit for each of these applications, we understand that you could have one single on-board GNSS monitoring system that could provide positioning for all of them. And you would thereby save on costs."

      There are barriers, he said, including the fact that commercial GNSS equipment manufacturers are not necessarily using the best quality chipsets at this time. "That means we may need to rely on more expensive sensor technologies to give us the required precision and integrity," Fernández said. "On the other hand, if we can push for a more advanced, more precise GNSS receiver, such as a multi-constellation and multi-frequency receiver, we could save some of the money that would otherwise go to other types of sensors."

      Regardless of what kind of GNSS device finds its way into autonomous vehicles, there will always be some inherent weaknesses associated with satellite-based navigation, Fernández acknowledged. GNSS signals are comparatively weak and do not penetrate buildings such as multi-story car parks or inside tunnels, and there are issues of reflectivity and satellite visibility in built-up urban areas. Other potential problems include vulnerability to intentional and unintentional signal interferences.

      These potential problems can be overcome, as already suggested, by hybridization with other positioning sensors and highly accurate digital maps. These techniques, it is hoped, will ultimately provide a seamless position fixing capability while moving between outdoor and indoor environments.

      "Ubiquitous positioning is a serious challenge if you want to be able to work in different environments and keep the same level of integrity," said Fernández. "But the combination of GNSS with other technologies, such as simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) and also inertial systems will allow us to overcome these problems."

      And there will be more high-accuracy GNSS services, he said. "We have in front of us the Galileo Commercial Service that is going to provide, starting at the beginning, high accuracy positioning. Then, in a second phase, the CS will provide an extra authentication feature that will tell you whether the signal is actually coming from a satellite or from some other source."

      Cyber security is also being addressed, he said: "The basic message is if you want to go for the use of GNSS, in a regulated way, in autonomous driving, we need to think about the cyber security aspects and the industry will demand solutions that are providing authentication of the satellite signal."

      Seeking more input

      In an important announcement, Fernández said the European Commission, along with the GSA, has decided to create a new European consultation platform for GNSS applications. "In the United States you have the so-called Civil GPS Service Interface Committee that basically is providing the opinion of the different communities. So in this same way we have designed the concept of the 'European GNSS User Consultation Platform', which will systematically gather opinions, not just from the transport modes but also in the professional market."

      The platform, he said, will be divided into subgroups represent the mass market, the professional market and other segments, with a plenary to bring them all together. "There will of course be a panel for transport, including a section on road transport," said Fernandez.

      "We need and want to know what the user's needs in the market are, in order to improve our services and develop our thinking about future evolutions. And really that’s the aim of this group, to contribute on the future of GNSS and the Galileo system."

      The first meeting of the new European GNSS User Consultation Platform is set to take place on 28 November in Madrid, and the GSA says it is hoping to hear much more from, among others, the participants who worked with so much energy under the SaPPART initiative.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      SaPPART will deliver high-integrity and high-precision positioning capabilities for a variety of in-vehicle applications

      Stakeholder Consultation GSA/SC/30/17 on Galileo Commercial Service High Accuracy Provision

      16.11.2017 14:41  
      Published: 
      16 November 2017

      Ongoing discussions between stakeholders of the Galileo Programme have outlined the opportunity to consider offering the High Accuracy Commercial Service (HA CS) to all interested users on a free of charge basis, with content and format of data publicly and openly available on a global scale.

      This approach would increase the public benefit delivered by Galileo, contributing to its positioning in the market as the first GNSS system offering high accuracy services on a free of charge basis. At the same time, since departing from the scheme originally foreseen by Implementing Decision (EU) 2017/2243 of 8 February 2017, the possibility to provide HA CS on a free of charge and global basis needs to be carefully assessed in many respects. The results of the consultation may be used to support the change of the Implementing Decision. On this basis, preparation and conduct of a procurement procedure for Commercial Service provision may be initiated by the GSA. For the avoidance of doubt this stakeholder consultation shall not create any obligation on the GSA as to possible follow-up procurements.

      All organisations, economic operators and members of the public with a personal or professional interest in Galileo Commercial Service, are invited to express their opinion, experience and expectations with the various aspects of the Galileo Commercial Service provision.

      Further information on the Consultation is provided here.

      Deadline for submission : 7 December 2017

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      Stakeholder Consultation GSA/SC/30/17 on Galileo Commercial Service High Accuracy Provision

      16.11.2017 14:41  
      Published: 
      16 November 2017

       

      Ongoing discussions between stakeholders of the Galileo Programme have outlined the opportunity to consider offering the High Accuracy Commercial Service (HA CS) to all interested users on a free of charge basis, with content and format of data publicly and openly available on a global scale. This approach would increase the public benefit delivered by Galileo, contributing to its positioning in the market as the first GNSS system offering high accuracy services on a free of charge basis. At the same time, since departing from the scheme originally foreseen by Implementing Decision (EU) 2017/2243 of 8 February 2017, the possibility to provide HA CS on a free of charge and global basis needs to be carefully assessed in many respects. The results of the consultation may be used to support the change of the Implementing Decision. On this basis, preparation and conduct of a procurement procedure for Commercial Service provision may be initiated by the GSA. For the avoidance of doubt this stakeholder consultation shall not create any obligation on the GSA as to possible follow-up procurements.

      All organisations, economic operators and members of the public with a personal or professional interest in Galileo Commercial Service, are invited to express their opinion, experience and expectations with the various aspects of the Galileo Commercial Service provision.

      Further information on the Consultation is provided here.

      Deadline for submission : 30 November 2017

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      Stakeholder Consultation GSA/SC/30/17 on Galileo Commercial Service High Accuracy Provision

      16.11.2017 14:41  
      Published: 
      16 November 2017

      Ongoing discussions between stakeholders of the Galileo Programme have outlined the opportunity to consider offering the High Accuracy Commercial Service (HA CS) to all interested users on a free of charge basis, with content and format of data publicly and openly available on a global scale. This approach would increase the public benefit delivered by Galileo, contributing to its positioning in the market as the first GNSS system offering high accuracy services on a free of charge basis. At the same time, since departing from the scheme originally foreseen by Implementing Decision (EU) 2017/2243 of 8 February 2017, the possibility to provide HA CS on a free of charge and global basis needs to be carefully assessed in many respects. The results of the consultation may be used to support the change of the Implementing Decision. On this basis, preparation and conduct of a procurement procedure for Commercial Service provision may be initiated by the GSA. For the avoidance of doubt this stakeholder consultation shall not create any obligation on the GSA as to possible follow-up procurements.

      All organisations, economic operators and members of the public with a personal or professional interest in Galileo Commercial Service, are invited to express their opinion, experience and expectations with the various aspects of the Galileo Commercial Service provision.

      Further information on the Consultation is provided here.

      Deadline for submission : 30 November 2017

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      Stakeholder Consultation GSA/SC/30/17 on Galileo Commercial Service High Accuracy Provision

      16.11.2017 14:41  
      Published: 
      16 November 2017

      Ongoing discussions between stakeholders of the Galileo Programme have outlined the opportunity to consider offering the High Accuracy Commercial Service (HA CS) to all interested users on a free of charge basis, with content and format of data publicly and openly available on a global scale.

      This approach would increase the public benefit delivered by Galileo, contributing to its positioning in the market as the first GNSS system offering high accuracy services on a free of charge basis. At the same time, since departing from the scheme originally foreseen by Implementing Decision (EU) 2017/2243 of 8 February 2017, the possibility to provide HA CS on a free of charge and global basis needs to be carefully assessed in many respects. The results of the consultation may be used to support the change of the Implementing Decision. On this basis, preparation and conduct of a procurement procedure for Commercial Service provision may be initiated by the GSA. For the avoidance of doubt this stakeholder consultation shall not create any obligation on the GSA as to possible follow-up procurements.

      All organisations, economic operators and members of the public with a personal or professional interest in Galileo Commercial Service, are invited to express their opinion, experience and expectations with the various aspects of the Galileo Commercial Service provision.

      Further information on the Consultation is provided here.

      Deadline for submission : 30 November 2017

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      Stakeholder Consultation GSA/SC/30/17 on Galileo Commercial Service High Accuracy Provision

      16.11.2017 14:41  
      Published: 
      16 November 2017

      Ongoing discussions between stakeholders of the Galileo Programme have outlined the opportunity to consider offering the High Accuracy Commercial Service (HA CS) to all interested users on a free of charge basis, with content and format of data publicly and openly available on a global scale.

      This approach would increase the public benefit delivered by Galileo, contributing to its positioning in the market as the first GNSS system offering high accuracy services on a free of charge basis. At the same time, since departing from the scheme originally foreseen by Implementing Decision (EU) 2017/2243 of 8 February 2017, the possibility to provide HA CS on a free of charge and global basis needs to be carefully assessed in many respects. The results of the consultation may be used to support the change of the Implementing Decision. On this basis, preparation and conduct of a procurement procedure for Commercial Service provision may be initiated by the GSA. For the avoidance of doubt this stakeholder consultation shall not create any obligation on the GSA as to possible follow-up procurements.

      All organisations, economic operators and members of the public with a personal or professional interest in Galileo Commercial Service, are invited to express their opinion, experience and expectations with the various aspects of the Galileo Commercial Service provision.

      Further information on the Consultation is provided here.

      Deadline for submission : 7 December 2017

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      GSA launches Galileo test campaign for GIS grade receivers

      16.11.2017 10:48  
      Published: 
      16 November 2017

      GSA is reaching out to receivers manufactures with a Galileo test campaign for GIS grade receivers.  Receivers will be tested using Signal in Space, and comparing GNSS constellations or their combinations both in a single frequency and dual frequency mode.

      The European GNSS Agency (GSA) has officially launched the Galileo test campaign for GIS grade receivers with the main objective to evaluate the receivers` performance, highlighting the added value of Galileo system for GIS Data Collection.

      Testing with GSA provides, among others, the following advantages:

      • Independent tests: GSA will conduct neutral tests and provide objective results.
      • Flexible test cases: GSA can modify or add new test cases depending on the manufacturer's needs.
      • Two facilities equipped with state-of-the-art tools and instruments: GSA is collaborating with two laboratories (one at Thales Alenia Space Italy and the other at Airbus Defense and Space) to carry out the test cases.
      • Free of cost: The tests are completely free of charge to the manufacturers as the aim of the campaign is to support to the industry to leverage the benefits of Galileo.
      • Anonymous comparison of results: GSA provides the opportunity to compare results with other manufacturers in an anonymous way.

      The scenarios of interest will be tested comparing the different GNSS constellations and their combinations both in a single frequency and dual frequency mode. All receivers will be tested using GNSS Signal in Space, so the test execution will be performed in parallel running all the receivers under test at the same time for each test case.

      The tests will assess:

      • positioning accuracy under different conditions
      • time-to-first-fix
      • tracking capability

      Sign up today!

      Manufacturers are encouraged to take advantage of this opportunity, which is completely free-of-charge and on a voluntary basis. All results will be kept confidential and covered by individual non-disclosure agreements. For more information, contact the GSA Market Development Department (market@gsa.europa.eu) no later than 1 December 2017.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      H2020 Call for Proposals Now Open

      15.11.2017 12:54  
      Published: 
      15 November 2017

      Through its latest Horizon 2020 (H2020) call for proposals, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is seeking Galileo and EGNOS-enabled applications to meet the evolving needs of various market segments.

      The new call for proposals focuses on two main activities:

      1. The development of innovative Galileo and EGNOS enabled applications in different market segments; and
      2. Raising awareness about and building capacity for European GNSS.

      The aim of the first activity is to support the market uptake of European GNSS both in Europe and beyond. Proposed applications should leverage the differentiators of EGNOS and Galileo systems, including multi- frequency capability, high accuracy, authentication services, and better accuracy for single-frequency users. Proposed applications should have a commercial impact that will help foster green, safe and smart mobility, along with digitisation. Applications should also support societal resilience and contribute to environment protection.

      The second activity is dedicated to the development of EGNSS competences. Proposals should focus on raising awareness and providing opportunities for creating networks of industrial relationships. Applications that facilitate international cooperation are also encouraged.

      Overall, these two activities will maximise the adoption of Galileo and EGNOS. They will also support the European GNSS industry by contributing to its growth and competitiveness and by creating jobs and public benefits. 

      The deadline for applications in all categories is 5 March 2019.

      The topics of the call are the following:

      EGNSS applications fostering green, safe and smart mobility

      The main focus is on those applications that will lead to low emission, safer, more secure, lower cost and higher performance transport solutions able to respond to society’s increasing mobility needs. For example, within the aviation, road, maritime and rail sectors, this could include applications relating to advanced navigation, connected cars, vessel navigation or autonomous trains.

      The indicative budget for this topic is EUR 10 million.

      EGNSS applications fostering digitisation

      Proposals should foster digitisation and integrate such digital technologies as the Internet of Things (IoT), cloud computing, big data and robotics. Specifically, funds will be awarded to those proposals that facilitate the adoption of EGNOS and Galileo in mass markets, encourage the competitiveness of the European GNSS industry in mobile applications, and maximise public benefits by addressing such societal challenges as health, citizen safety, mobility and regional growth. Preference will be given to those applications that make the best use of innovative EGNSS features like multipath resistance and authentication. Secure financial transactions, tracking solutions, augmented reality and commercial LBS are all examples of mass market applications that integrate digital technology.

      The indicative budget for this category of applications is EUR 4 million.

      EGNSS applications fostering societal resilience and protecting the environment

      The main focus of this topic is on protecting the environment and promoting societal resilience through applications that support the wellbeing of EU citizens and emergency and disaster management. For example, search and rescue, surveying and mapping and efficient agriculture can all benefit from these types of applications. More specifically, as emergency and disaster management applications become increasingly important, they should integrate different sensors and position sources to better identify, locate and react in critical situations.

      Successful proposals in this category will leverage Galileo and EGNOS differentiators in order to both increase effectiveness and reduce costs.

      The indicative budget for this category of applications is EUR 4 million.

      Awareness, networks and international cooperation

      As it is more important than ever to raise awareness about E-GNSS competencies across EU Member States and Associated Countries, this call aims to support building industrial relationships by uniting private and public institutions around EGSS services. Proposals within this topic should support the competitiveness of EU industry by identifying strategic partners and developing market opportunities, promote incentive schemes and encourage the emergence of new downstream applications based on Galileo and EGNOS.

      The indicative budget for this category of applications is EUR 2 million.

      More information on the call is available here.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      The deadline for applications is 5 March 2019.

      Galileo Public Regulated Service (PRS) application takes overall prize at ESNC awards in Tallinn

      10.11.2017 12:24  
      The ESNCC is an effective scouting and support mechanism for new European GNSS applications
      Published: 
      09 November 2017

      The SORUS solution, developed by Alexander Rügamer from Fraunhofer IIS and Dr Jan Wendel from Airbus Defence and Space, significantly reduces the security requirements and Galileo PRS costs per user device, which means that police, Special Forces, and other authorised Galileo PRS users can exploit the application to equip their UAVs with a secure, trustworthy, solution that is resistant to jamming and spoofing.

      The system enables user receivers to calculate Galileo PRS positions at predefined points in time and circumvents all the drawbacks of conventional PRS receivers and server-based techniques. For example, the solution does away with the need for a PRS security module on the user receiver, in addition to resolving problems related to size, weight and power. The application stores short sequences of Galileo PRS pseudo-random noise (PRN) code chips on user receivers prior to missions, which are only valid for the duration and area of a given mission.

      An effective scouting and support mechanism

      25 more business cases and challenge winners were also recognised at the awards ceremony by high-ranking industry and institutional representatives, including the European GNSS Agency (GSA), the European Space Agency (ESA), the German Aerospace Centre (DLR), the German Federal Ministry of Transport and Digital Infrastructure (BMVI) and the European Committee of the Regions (CoR). In addition, 20 partner regions from across the globe awarded the best competition entries.

      GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides commented that the ESNC had once again proven to be an effective scouting and support mechanism for new European GNSS applications. “The GSA is proud to be a long-time partner in this useful initiative. The new applications inspired by this competition constantly advance the growth and use of GNSS technology,” he said.

      Special Prizes

      The SORUS project also received a Special Prize awarded by the German Federal Ministry of Transport and Digital Infrastructure (BMVI) and the Bavaria Challenge. This year’s GSA ‘EU at 60 – Space for Europe’ Special Prize went to CENTRIP (ChildrEN TRIp Protector), a project developed by Ewa Kodziolka of Poland to help teachers keep track of students during field trips and outings. For more on this innovative project, click here.

      E-GNSS Accelerator

      The ESNC is now additionally equipped with a new E-GNSS Accelerator. This programme is a unique opportunity for entrepreneurs and start-ups to accelerate their business case on a broad scale and bring their products and services to market. The E-GNSS Accelerator will run for three years and will directly support the winners of the ESNC 2017, 2018 and 2019. This programme offers the top three pitching start-ups access to dedicated incubation programmes at their preferred incubation centre of the ESNC network all across Europe worth EUR 180,000.

      About ESNC

      The ESNC annually awards the best services, products, and business ideas using satellite navigation in everyday life, spurring the development of respective market-driven applications. For 14 years, the international innovation competition has served as an accelerator for space‐related entrepreneurs and start-ups. Since 2004, over 11,500 developers have competed for an overall prize pool worth EUR 13 million, with more than 300 winners having been selected by 200 international judges. For more information on the ESNC, including all relevant information on prizes, partners, and terms of participation, visit the Competition’s official website: www.esnc.eu.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link the article back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      Galileo Public Regulated Service (PRS) application takes overall prize at ESNC awards in Tallinn

      10.11.2017 12:24  
      The ESNCC is an effective scouting and support mechanism for new European GNSS applications
      Published: 
      09 November 2017

      The SORUS solution, developed by Alexander Rügamer from Fraunhofer IIS and Dr Jan Wendel from Airbus Defence and Space, significantly reduces the security requirements and Galileo PRS costs per user device, which means that police, Special Forces, and other authorised Galileo PRS users can exploit the application to equip their UAVs with a secure, trustworthy, solution that is resistant to jamming and spoofing.

      The system enables user receivers to calculate Galileo PRS positions at predefined points in time and circumvents all the drawbacks of conventional PRS receivers and server-based techniques. For example, the solution does away with the need for a PRS security module on the user receiver, in addition to resolving problems related to size, weight and power. The application stores short sequences of Galileo PRS pseudo-random noise (PRN) code chips on user receivers prior to missions, which are only valid for the duration and area of a given mission.

      An effective scouting and support mechanism

      The ESNCC is an effective scouting and support mechanism for new European GNSS applications

      25 more business cases and challenge winners were also recognised at the awards ceremony by high-ranking industry and institutional representatives, including the European GNSS Agency (GSA), the European Space Agency (ESA), the German Aerospace Centre (DLR), the German Federal Ministry of Transport and Digital Infrastructure (BMVI) and the European Committee of the Regions (CoR). In addition, 20 partner regions from across the globe awarded the best competition entries.

      GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides commented that the ESNC had once again proven to be an effective scouting and support mechanism for new European GNSS applications. “The GSA is proud to be a long-time partner in this useful initiative. The new applications inspired by this competition constantly advance the growth and use of GNSS technology,” he said.

      Special Prizes

      The SORUS project also received a Special Prize awarded by the German Federal Ministry of Transport and Digital Infrastructure (BMVI) and the Bavaria Challenge. This year’s GSA ‘EU at 60 – Space for Europe’ Special Prize went to CENTRIP (ChildrEN TRIp Protector), a project developed by Ewa Kodziolka of Poland to help teachers keep track of students during field trips and outings. For more on this innovative project, click here.

      E-GNSS Accelerator

      The ESNC is now additionally equipped with a new E-GNSS Accelerator. This programme is a unique opportunity for entrepreneurs and start-ups to accelerate their business case on a broad scale and bring their products and services to market. The E-GNSS Accelerator will run for three years and will directly support the winners of the ESNC 2017, 2018 and 2019. This programme offers the top three pitching start-ups access to dedicated incubation programmes at their preferred incubation centre of the ESNC network all across Europe worth EUR 180,000.

      About ESNC

      The ESNC annually awards the best services, products, and business ideas using satellite navigation in everyday life, spurring the development of respective market-driven applications. For 14 years, the international innovation competition has served as an accelerator for space‐related entrepreneurs and start-ups. Since 2004, over 11,500 developers have competed for an overall prize pool worth EUR 13 million, with more than 300 winners having been selected by 200 international judges. For more information on the ESNC, including all relevant information on prizes, partners, and terms of participation, visit the Competition’s official website: www.esnc.eu.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      Galileo Public Regulated Service (PRS) application takes overall prize at ESNC awards in Tallinn

      Winner of ‘EU at 60 – Space for Europe’ Special Prize Special Prize helps keep kids safe

      10.11.2017 12:15  
      The ESNCC is an effective scouting and support mechanism for new European GNSS applications
      Published: 
      09 November 2017

      Kids are unpredictable and easily distracted – and any parent or teacher knows well how fast a kid can simply wander off. In fact, whenever a teacher takes a group of students outside the classroom, such as to go on a field trip, one of their greatest challenges – and causes of stress – is trying to keep track of everyone. There are simply too many tragedies that begin with a child wandering away from the group to not do everything possible to minimise this risk.

      Now, thanks to the CENTRIP early warning system, teachers can utilise GNSS-enabled technology to constantly track and locate each individual student.

      Giving teachers another set of eyes

      The winner of this year’s GSA ‘EU at 60 – Space for Europe’ Special Prize at the European Satellite Navigation Conference (ESNC), CENTRIP (ChildrEN TRIp Protector) was developed out of the ESA/JRC summer school on GNSS. The CENTRIP team is led by Ewa Kadziolka and includes Philipp Muller, Terri Richardson, Yahao Cheng and Niccolo Gastaldello. “The idea behind CENTRIP is to increase the safety of children and lower the stress for teachers trying to keep track of a large group of students by using low-cost, easy to use technology,” she says. “For us, GNSS was clearly the way to go.”

      GSA Executive Director Carlos des Dorides commented that the GSA Special Prize winner focussed on the protection of Europe’s most valuable asset - its children. “It is one of the first GNSS tracking systems to offer an affordable solution for simultaneously tracking multiple people. Plus, it is designed to work indoors, outdoors and even underground on a metro, so it can be effective in all learning environments,” he said.

      CENTRIP combines GNSS (including Galileo) and ZigBee technology to set a geo-fence around a specified area. With the CENTRIP system, each child wears a lightweight, durable bracelet that contains a GNSS tracking device. Each teacher, on the other hand, is provided with an intuitive and easy-to-use device that helps track the location of each child.

      If a student strays away from the group and outside the specified area, both the student and the teacher receive alerts. The audio alert on the child’s wristband is meant to get their attention, causing them to ‘look up’ and see that they’ve wandered away from the group, whereas the teacher’s alert shows the child’s location on the screen of their CENTRIP device. Using the tracking information, the teacher can then quickly and easily track and find the student before they wander out of sight. 

      Ready for every type of field trip

      According to Kadziolka, one of the key features of the device is its flexibility. “CENTRIP is designed to work indoors and outdoors and even underground on a metro, meaning it can be used in all learning environments,” she says. As a school group moves from, for example, the metro to a park and into a museum, the teacher can constantly adjust the parameters of the geo-fence based on the risk. “If a group is waiting for a metro, the teacher can keep the parameters within meters, but if they are in the park and they want to give the kids more freedom, the parameters can be easily expanded directly from their CENTRIP device.”

      Thanks to the system’s use of GNSS, CENTRIP also offers an array of helpful location-based information. “Based on the group’s location, CENTRIP can

      provide the teacher with the location of the closest hospital, a list of local emergency numbers and even stores where they can go and get necessary supplies,” explains Kadziolka. As an add-on feature, CENTRIP has the possibility to incorporate a SIM card, which adds an additional layer of protection so if a kid does happen to wander out of the system’s parameters, the teacher can still track their location using the same CENTRIP device.

      From idea to reality

      Ewa and the CENTRIP team now have the opportunity to make CENTRIP a reality. “We thought we had a good idea that could harness the power of European GNSS in order to keep kids safe,” she says. “Being awarded the Special Prize is a validation of the value that our idea will bring to schools across Europe and, hopefully someday, the world.”

      Thanks to the support provided by the 60 Years of EU Special Prize, the team is now set to develop their idea at a suitable incubation centre of their choice within the EU28 for six months, with the option of a six-month extension based on an evaluation after the first six-month period (a total value of up to EUR 40,000).

      About the GSA 60 Years of EU Prize

      In celebration of the 60th anniversary of the signing of the Treaty of Rome, which laid the foundation for building the EU, the GSA 60 Years of EU Special Prize focused on the contribution that Europe’s space programmes – and in particular European GNSS – make to European integration. The prize was awarded during last night’s (7 November 2017) annual European Satellite Navigation Competition (ESNC) and Copernicus Masters ceremony, Europe’s pre-eminent innovation competitions for space applications.

      The 2017 edition of the ESNC again received a remarkable number of entries. CENTRIP’s winning idea was competing against a total of 76 entries from 16 business sectors – including 28 start-ups, 11 SMEs, nine universities and 23 individuals.

      “According to the GSA’s 2017 Market Report, personal tracking devices will soon become the fastest growing market within the LBS sector – with many solutions using Galileo for enhanced performances,” says GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. “CENTRIP is following this trend. The concept is unique as there is no such solution on the market that monitors groups of children.”

      Des Dorides notes how the CENTRIP team is very motivated to enter the market. “They have a clear, convincing business plan that proves their aim to commercialise the product in the short term,” he adds. “In fact, CENTRIC already has potential customers, as some nurseries from Germany have expressed interest in wanting to implement the solution.”

      The annual event recognises the most outstanding applications for Copernicus and European GNSS (Galileo and EGNOS) in various categories. Since 2014, the awards ceremony has been associated with the Satellite Masters Conference. The conference, which this year took place in Tallinn, Estonia and was a part of European Space Week, features an array of plenary sessions, workshops and roundtable discussions centred on leveraging satellite-derived data and other space solutions for business and society. It serves as a unique marketplace for sharing ideas on space-based innovation and connecting with the world’s leading network for downstream satellite businesses. 

      CENTRIP Features

      • Accurate dual system location
      • Location tagging
      • Boundary setting
      • Band removal alert
      • Water resistant
      • View and track your GPS tracker in real time (optional)
      • Records full GNSS history for all journeys, showing addresses of locations visited and time spent at locations (optional)
      • Used by care-givers and families
      • Geo fencing (perimeter alert)
      • Movement alerts and warnings

       

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link the article back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      Winner of ‘EU at 60 – Space for Europe’ Special Prize helps keep kids safe

      10.11.2017 12:15  
      The ESNCC is an effective scouting and support mechanism for new European GNSS applications
      Published: 
      09 November 2017

      Kids are unpredictable and easily distracted – and any parent or teacher knows well how fast a kid can simply wander off. In fact, whenever a teacher takes a group of students outside the classroom, such as to go on a field trip, one of their greatest challenges – and causes of stress – is trying to keep track of everyone. There are simply too many tragedies that begin with a child wandering away from the group to not do everything possible to minimise this risk.

      Now, thanks to the CENTRIP early warning system, teachers can utilise GNSS-enabled technology to constantly track and locate each individual student.

      Giving teachers another set of eyes

      The winner of this year’s GSA ‘EU at 60 – Space for Europe’ Special Prize at the European Satellite Navigation Conference (ESNC), CENTRIP (ChildrEN TRIp Protector) was developed out of the ESA/JRC summer school on GNSS. The CENTRIP team is led by Ewa Kadziolka and includes Philipp Muller, Terri Richardson, Yahao Cheng and Niccolo Gastaldello. “The idea behind CENTRIP is to increase the safety of children and lower the stress for teachers trying to keep track of a large group of students by using low-cost, easy to use technology,” she says. “For us, GNSS was clearly the way to go.”

      GSA Executive Director Carlos des Dorides commented that the GSA Special Prize winner focussed on the protection of Europe’s most valuable asset - its children. “It is one of the first GNSS tracking systems to offer an affordable solution for simultaneously tracking multiple people. Plus, it is designed to work indoors, outdoors and even underground on a metro, so it can be effective in all learning environments,” he said.

      CENTRIP combines GNSS (including Galileo) and ZigBee technology to set a geo-fence around a specified area. With the CENTRIP system, each child wears a lightweight, durable bracelet that contains a GNSS tracking device. Each teacher, on the other hand, is provided with an intuitive and easy-to-use device that helps track the location of each child.

      If a student strays away from the group and outside the specified area, both the student and the teacher receive alerts. The audio alert on the child’s wristband is meant to get their attention, causing them to ‘look up’ and see that they’ve wandered away from the group, whereas the teacher’s alert shows the child’s location on the screen of their CENTRIP device. Using the tracking information, the teacher can then quickly and easily track and find the student before they wander out of sight. 

      Ready for every type of field trip

      According to Kadziolka, one of the key features of the device is its flexibility. “CENTRIP is designed to work indoors and outdoors and even underground on a metro, meaning it can be used in all learning environments,” she says. As a school group moves from, for example, the metro to a park and into a museum, the teacher can constantly adjust the parameters of the geo-fence based on the risk. “If a group is waiting for a metro, the teacher can keep the parameters within meters, but if they are in the park and they want to give the kids more freedom, the parameters can be easily expanded directly from their CENTRIP device.”

      Thanks to the system’s use of GNSS, CENTRIP also offers an array of helpful location-based information. “Based on the group’s location, CENTRIP can

      provide the teacher with the location of the closest hospital, a list of local emergency numbers and even stores where they can go and get necessary supplies,” explains Kadziolka. As an add-on feature, CENTRIP has the possibility to incorporate a SIM card, which adds an additional layer of protection so if a kid does happen to wander out of the system’s parameters, the teacher can still track their location using the same CENTRIP device.

      From idea to reality

      Ewa and the CENTRIP team now have the opportunity to make CENTRIP a reality. “We thought we had a good idea that could harness the power of European GNSS in order to keep kids safe,” she says. “Being awarded the Special Prize is a validation of the value that our idea will bring to schools across Europe and, hopefully someday, the world.”

      Thanks to the support provided by the 60 Years of EU Special Prize, the team is now set to develop their idea at a suitable incubation centre of their choice within the EU28 for six months, with the option of a six-month extension based on an evaluation after the first six-month period (a total value of up to EUR 40,000).

      About the GSA 60 Years of EU Prize

      In celebration of the 60th anniversary of the signing of the Treaty of Rome, which laid the foundation for building the EU, the GSA 60 Years of EU Special Prize focused on the contribution that Europe’s space programmes – and in particular European GNSS – make to European integration. The prize was awarded during last night’s (7 November 2017) annual European Satellite Navigation Competition (ESNC) and Copernicus Masters ceremony, Europe’s pre-eminent innovation competitions for space applications.

      The 2017 edition of the ESNC again received a remarkable number of entries. CENTRIP’s winning idea was competing against a total of 76 entries from 16 business sectors – including 28 start-ups, 11 SMEs, nine universities and 23 individuals.

      “According to the GSA’s 2017 Market Report, personal tracking devices will soon become the fastest growing market within the LBS sector – with many solutions using Galileo for enhanced performances,” says GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. “CENTRIP is following this trend. The concept is unique as there is no such solution on the market that monitors groups of children.”

      Des Dorides notes how the CENTRIP team is very motivated to enter the market. “They have a clear, convincing business plan that proves their aim to commercialise the product in the short term,” he adds. “In fact, CENTRIC already has potential customers, as some nurseries from Germany have expressed interest in wanting to implement the solution.”

      The annual event recognises the most outstanding applications for Copernicus and European GNSS (Galileo and EGNOS) in various categories. Since 2014, the awards ceremony has been associated with the Satellite Masters Conference. The conference, which this year took place in Tallinn, Estonia and was a part of European Space Week, features an array of plenary sessions, workshops and roundtable discussions centred on leveraging satellite-derived data and other space solutions for business and society. It serves as a unique marketplace for sharing ideas on space-based innovation and connecting with the world’s leading network for downstream satellite businesses. 

      CENTRIP Features

      • Accurate dual system location
      • Location tagging
      • Boundary setting
      • Band removal alert
      • Water resistant
      • View and track your GPS tracker in real time (optional)
      • Records full GNSS history for all journeys, showing addresses of locations visited and time spent at locations (optional)
      • Used by care-givers and families
      • Geo fencing (perimeter alert)
      • Movement alerts and warnings

       

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link the article back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      Winner of ‘EU at 60 – Space for Europe’ Special Prize helps keep kids safe

      10.11.2017 12:15  
      The ESNCC is an effective scouting and support mechanism for new European GNSS applications
      Published: 
      09 November 2017

      Kids are unpredictable and easily distracted – and any parent or teacher knows well how fast a kid can simply wander off. In fact, whenever a teacher takes a group of students outside the classroom, such as to go on a field trip, one of their greatest challenges – and causes of stress – is trying to keep track of everyone. There are simply too many tragedies that begin with a child wandering away from the group to not do everything possible to minimise this risk.

      Now, thanks to the CENTRIP early warning system, teachers can utilise GNSS-enabled technology to constantly track and locate each individual student.

      Giving teachers another set of eyes

      The winner of this year’s GSA ‘EU at 60 – Space for Europe’ Special Prize at the European Satellite Navigation Conference (ESNC), CENTRIP (ChildrEN TRIp Protector) was developed out of the ESA/JRC summer school on GNSS. The CENTRIP team is led by Ewa Kadziolka and includes Philipp Muller, Terri Richardson, Yahao Cheng and Niccolo Gastaldello. “The idea behind CENTRIP is to increase the safety of children and lower the stress for teachers trying to keep track of a large group of students by using low-cost, easy to use technology,” she says. “For us, GNSS was clearly the way to go.”

      GSA Executive Director Carlos des Dorides commented that the GSA Special Prize winner focussed on the protection of Europe’s most valuable asset - its children. “It is one of the first GNSS tracking systems to offer an affordable solution for simultaneously tracking multiple people. Plus, it is designed to work indoors, outdoors and even underground on a metro, so it can be effective in all learning environments,” he said.

      CENTRIP combines GNSS (including Galileo) and ZigBee technology to set a geo-fence around a specified area. With the CENTRIP system, each child wears a lightweight, durable bracelet that contains a GNSS tracking device. Each teacher, on the other hand, is provided with an intuitive and easy-to-use device that helps track the location of each child.

      If a student strays away from the group and outside the specified area, both the student and the teacher receive alerts. The audio alert on the child’s wristband is meant to get their attention, causing them to ‘look up’ and see that they’ve wandered away from the group, whereas the teacher’s alert shows the child’s location on the screen of their CENTRIP device. Using the tracking information, the teacher can then quickly and easily track and find the student before they wander out of sight. 

      Ready for every type of field trip

      According to Kadziolka, one of the key features of the device is its flexibility. “CENTRIP is designed to work indoors and outdoors and even underground on a metro, meaning it can be used in all learning environments,” she says. As a school group moves from, for example, the metro to a park and into a museum, the teacher can constantly adjust the parameters of the geo-fence based on the risk. “If a group is waiting for a metro, the teacher can keep the parameters within meters, but if they are in the park and they want to give the kids more freedom, the parameters can be easily expanded directly from their CENTRIP device.”

      Thanks to the system’s use of GNSS, CENTRIP also offers an array of helpful location-based information. “Based on the group’s location, CENTRIP can

      provide the teacher with the location of the closest hospital, a list of local emergency numbers and even stores where they can go and get necessary supplies,” explains Kadziolka. As an add-on feature, CENTRIP has the possibility to incorporate a SIM card, which adds an additional layer of protection so if a kid does happen to wander out of the system’s parameters, the teacher can still track their location using the same CENTRIP device.

      From idea to reality

      Ewa and the CENTRIP team now have the opportunity to make CENTRIP a reality. “We thought we had a good idea that could harness the power of European GNSS in order to keep kids safe,” she says. “Being awarded the Special Prize is a validation of the value that our idea will bring to schools across Europe and, hopefully someday, the world.”

      Thanks to the support provided by the 60 Years of EU Special Prize, the team is now set to develop their idea at a suitable incubation centre of their choice within the EU28 for six months, with the option of a six-month extension based on an evaluation after the first six-month period (a total value of up to EUR 40,000).

      About the GSA 60 Years of EU Prize

      In celebration of the 60th anniversary of the signing of the Treaty of Rome, which laid the foundation for building the EU, the GSA 60 Years of EU Special Prize focused on the contribution that Europe’s space programmes – and in particular European GNSS – make to European integration. The prize was awarded during last night’s (7 November 2017) annual European Satellite Navigation Competition (ESNC) and Copernicus Masters ceremony, Europe’s pre-eminent innovation competitions for space applications.

      The 2017 edition of the ESNC again received a remarkable number of entries. CENTRIP’s winning idea was competing against a total of 76 entries from 16 business sectors – including 28 start-ups, 11 SMEs, nine universities and 23 individuals.

      “According to the GSA’s 2017 Market Report, personal tracking devices will soon become the fastest growing market within the LBS sector – with many solutions using Galileo for enhanced performances,” says GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. “CENTRIP is following this trend. The concept is unique as there is no such solution on the market that monitors groups of children.”

      Des Dorides notes how the CENTRIP team is very motivated to enter the market. “They have a clear, convincing business plan that proves their aim to commercialise the product in the short term,” he adds. “In fact, CENTRIC already has potential customers, as some nurseries from Germany have expressed interest in wanting to implement the solution.”

      The annual event recognises the most outstanding applications for Copernicus and European GNSS (Galileo and EGNOS) in various categories. Since 2014, the awards ceremony has been associated with the Satellite Masters Conference. The conference, which this year took place in Tallinn, Estonia and was a part of European Space Week, features an array of plenary sessions, workshops and roundtable discussions centred on leveraging satellite-derived data and other space solutions for business and society. It serves as a unique marketplace for sharing ideas on space-based innovation and connecting with the world’s leading network for downstream satellite businesses. 

      CENTRIP Features

      • Accurate dual system location
      • Location tagging
      • Boundary setting
      • Band removal alert
      • Water resistant
      • View and track your GPS tracker in real time (optional)
      • Records full GNSS history for all journeys, showing addresses of locations visited and time spent at locations (optional)
      • Used by care-givers and families
      • Geo fencing (perimeter alert)
      • Movement alerts and warnings

       

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link the article back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      The ESNCC is an effective scouting and support mechanism for new European GNSS applications

      Winner of ‘EU at 60 – Space for Europe’ Special Prize helps keep kids safe

      10.11.2017 12:15  
      Winner of ‘EU at 60 – Space for Europe’ Special Prize helps keep kids safe
      Published: 
      09 November 2017

      Kids are unpredictable and easily distracted – and any parent or teacher knows well how fast a kid can simply wander off. In fact, whenever a teacher takes a group of students outside the classroom, such as to go on a field trip, one of their greatest challenges – and causes of stress – is trying to keep track of everyone. There are simply too many tragedies that begin with a child wandering away from the group to not do everything possible to minimise this risk.

      Now, thanks to the CENTRIP early warning system, teachers can utilise GNSS-enabled technology to constantly track and locate each individual student.

      Giving teachers another set of eyes

      The winner of this year’s GSA ‘EU at 60 – Space for Europe’ Special Prize at the European Satellite Navigation Conference (ESNC), CENTRIP (ChildrEN TRIp Protector) was developed out of the ESA/JRC summer school on GNSS. The CENTRIP team is led by Ewa Kadziolka and includes Philipp Muller, Terri Richardson, Yahao Cheng and Niccolo Gastaldello. “The idea behind CENTRIP is to increase the safety of children and lower the stress for teachers trying to keep track of a large group of students by using low-cost, easy to use technology,” she says. “For us, GNSS was clearly the way to go.”

      GSA Executive Director Carlos des Dorides commented that the GSA Special Prize winner focussed on the protection of Europe’s most valuable asset - its children. “It is one of the first GNSS tracking systems to offer an affordable solution for simultaneously tracking multiple people. Plus, it is designed to work indoors, outdoors and even underground on a metro, so it can be effective in all learning environments,” he said.

      CENTRIP combines GNSS (including Galileo) and ZigBee technology to set a geo-fence around a specified area. With the CENTRIP system, each child wears a lightweight, durable bracelet that contains a GNSS tracking device. Each teacher, on the other hand, is provided with an intuitive and easy-to-use device that helps track the location of each child.

      If a student strays away from the group and outside the specified area, both the student and the teacher receive alerts. The audio alert on the child’s wristband is meant to get their attention, causing them to ‘look up’ and see that they’ve wandered away from the group, whereas the teacher’s alert shows the child’s location on the screen of their CENTRIP device. Using the tracking information, the teacher can then quickly and easily track and find the student before they wander out of sight. 

      Ready for every type of field trip

      According to Kadziolka, one of the key features of the device is its flexibility. “CENTRIP is designed to work indoors and outdoors and even underground on a metro, meaning it can be used in all learning environments,” she says. As a school group moves from, for example, the metro to a park and into a museum, the teacher can constantly adjust the parameters of the geo-fence based on the risk. “If a group is waiting for a metro, the teacher can keep the parameters within meters, but if they are in the park and they want to give the kids more freedom, the parameters can be easily expanded directly from their CENTRIP device.”

      Thanks to the system’s use of GNSS, CENTRIP also offers an array of helpful location-based information. “Based on the group’s location, CENTRIP can

      provide the teacher with the location of the closest hospital, a list of local emergency numbers and even stores where they can go and get necessary supplies,” explains Kadziolka. As an add-on feature, CENTRIP has the possibility to incorporate a SIM card, which adds an additional layer of protection so if a kid does happen to wander out of the system’s parameters, the teacher can still track their location using the same CENTRIP device.

      From idea to reality

      Ewa and the CENTRIP team now have the opportunity to make CENTRIP a reality. “We thought we had a good idea that could harness the power of European GNSS in order to keep kids safe,” she says. “Being awarded the Special Prize is a validation of the value that our idea will bring to schools across Europe and, hopefully someday, the world.”

      Thanks to the support provided by the 60 Years of EU Special Prize, the team is now set to develop their idea at a suitable incubation centre of their choice within the EU28 for six months, with the option of a six-month extension based on an evaluation after the first six-month period (a total value of up to EUR 40,000).

      About the GSA 60 Years of EU Prize

      In celebration of the 60th anniversary of the signing of the Treaty of Rome, which laid the foundation for building the EU, the GSA 60 Years of EU Special Prize focused on the contribution that Europe’s space programmes – and in particular European GNSS – make to European integration. The prize was awarded during last night’s (7 November 2017) annual European Satellite Navigation Competition (ESNC) and Copernicus Masters ceremony, Europe’s pre-eminent innovation competitions for space applications.

      The 2017 edition of the ESNC again received a remarkable number of entries. CENTRIP’s winning idea was competing against a total of 76 entries from 16 business sectors – including 28 start-ups, 11 SMEs, nine universities and 23 individuals.

      “According to the GSA’s 2017 Market Report, personal tracking devices will soon become the fastest growing market within the LBS sector – with many solutions using Galileo for enhanced performances,” says GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. “CENTRIP is following this trend. The concept is unique as there is no such solution on the market that monitors groups of children.”

      Des Dorides notes how the CENTRIP team is very motivated to enter the market. “They have a clear, convincing business plan that proves their aim to commercialise the product in the short term,” he adds. “In fact, CENTRIC already has potential customers, as some nurseries from Germany have expressed interest in wanting to implement the solution.”

      The annual event recognises the most outstanding applications for Copernicus and European GNSS (Galileo and EGNOS) in various categories. Since 2014, the awards ceremony has been associated with the Satellite Masters Conference. The conference, which this year took place in Tallinn, Estonia and was a part of European Space Week, features an array of plenary sessions, workshops and roundtable discussions centred on leveraging satellite-derived data and other space solutions for business and society. It serves as a unique marketplace for sharing ideas on space-based innovation and connecting with the world’s leading network for downstream satellite businesses. 

      CENTRIP Features

      • Accurate dual system location
      • Location tagging
      • Boundary setting
      • Band removal alert
      • Water resistant
      • View and track your GPS tracker in real time (optional)
      • Records full GNSS history for all journeys, showing addresses of locations visited and time spent at locations (optional)
      • Used by care-givers and families
      • Geo fencing (perimeter alert)
      • Movement alerts and warnings

       

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link the article back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      Winner of ‘EU at 60 – Space for Europe’ Special Prize helps keep kids safe

      Winner of ‘EU at 60 – Space for Europe’ Special Prize helps keep kids safe

      10.11.2017 12:15  
      ESNC GSA special prize
      Published: 
      09 November 2017

      Kids are unpredictable and easily distracted – and any parent or teacher knows well how fast a kid can simply wander off. In fact, whenever a teacher takes a group of students outside the classroom, such as to go on a field trip, one of their greatest challenges – and causes of stress – is trying to keep track of everyone. There are simply too many tragedies that begin with a child wandering away from the group to not do everything possible to minimise this risk.

      Now, thanks to the CENTRIP early warning system, teachers can utilise GNSS-enabled technology to constantly track and locate each individual student.

      Giving teachers another set of eyes

      The winner of this year’s GSA ‘EU at 60 – Space for Europe’ Special Prize at the European Satellite Navigation Conference (ESNC), CENTRIP (ChildrEN TRIp Protector) was developed out of the ESA/JRC summer school on GNSS. The CENTRIP team is led by Ewa Kadziolka and includes Philipp Muller, Terri Richardson, Yahao Cheng and Niccolo Gastaldello. “The idea behind CENTRIP is to increase the safety of children and lower the stress for teachers trying to keep track of a large group of students by using low-cost, easy to use technology,” she says. “For us, GNSS was clearly the way to go.”

      GSA Executive Director Carlos des Dorides commented that the GSA Special Prize winner focussed on the protection of Europe’s most valuable asset - its children. “It is one of the first GNSS tracking systems to offer an affordable solution for simultaneously tracking multiple people. Plus, it is designed to work indoors, outdoors and even underground on a metro, so it can be effective in all learning environments,” he said.

      CENTRIP combines GNSS (including Galileo) and ZigBee technology to set a geo-fence around a specified area. With the CENTRIP system, each child wears a lightweight, durable bracelet that contains a GNSS tracking device. Each teacher, on the other hand, is provided with an intuitive and easy-to-use device that helps track the location of each child.

      If a student strays away from the group and outside the specified area, both the student and the teacher receive alerts. The audio alert on the child’s wristband is meant to get their attention, causing them to ‘look up’ and see that they’ve wandered away from the group, whereas the teacher’s alert shows the child’s location on the screen of their CENTRIP device. Using the tracking information, the teacher can then quickly and easily track and find the student before they wander out of sight. 

      Ready for every type of field trip

      According to Kadziolka, one of the key features of the device is its flexibility. “CENTRIP is designed to work indoors and outdoors and even underground on a metro, meaning it can be used in all learning environments,” she says. As a school group moves from, for example, the metro to a park and into a museum, the teacher can constantly adjust the parameters of the geo-fence based on the risk. “If a group is waiting for a metro, the teacher can keep the parameters within meters, but if they are in the park and they want to give the kids more freedom, the parameters can be easily expanded directly from their CENTRIP device.”

      Thanks to the system’s use of GNSS, CENTRIP also offers an array of helpful location-based information. “Based on the group’s location, CENTRIP can

      provide the teacher with the location of the closest hospital, a list of local emergency numbers and even stores where they can go and get necessary supplies,” explains Kadziolka. As an add-on feature, CENTRIP has the possibility to incorporate a SIM card, which adds an additional layer of protection so if a kid does happen to wander out of the system’s parameters, the teacher can still track their location using the same CENTRIP device.

      From idea to reality

      Ewa and the CENTRIP team now have the opportunity to make CENTRIP a reality. “We thought we had a good idea that could harness the power of European GNSS in order to keep kids safe,” she says. “Being awarded the Special Prize is a validation of the value that our idea will bring to schools across Europe and, hopefully someday, the world.”

      Thanks to the support provided by the 60 Years of EU Special Prize, the team is now set to develop their idea at a suitable incubation centre of their choice within the EU28 for six months, with the option of a six-month extension based on an evaluation after the first six-month period (a total value of up to EUR 40,000).

      About the GSA 60 Years of EU Prize

      In celebration of the 60th anniversary of the signing of the Treaty of Rome, which laid the foundation for building the EU, the GSA 60 Years of EU Special Prize focused on the contribution that Europe’s space programmes – and in particular European GNSS – make to European integration. The prize was awarded during last night’s (7 November 2017) annual European Satellite Navigation Competition (ESNC) and Copernicus Masters ceremony, Europe’s pre-eminent innovation competitions for space applications.

      The 2017 edition of the ESNC again received a remarkable number of entries. CENTRIP’s winning idea was competing against a total of 76 entries from 16 business sectors – including 28 start-ups, 11 SMEs, nine universities and 23 individuals.

      “According to the GSA’s 2017 Market Report, personal tracking devices will soon become the fastest growing market within the LBS sector – with many solutions using Galileo for enhanced performances,” says GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. “CENTRIP is following this trend. The concept is unique as there is no such solution on the market that monitors groups of children.”

      Des Dorides notes how the CENTRIP team is very motivated to enter the market. “They have a clear, convincing business plan that proves their aim to commercialise the product in the short term,” he adds. “In fact, CENTRIC already has potential customers, as some nurseries from Germany have expressed interest in wanting to implement the solution.”

      The annual event recognises the most outstanding applications for Copernicus and European GNSS (Galileo and EGNOS) in various categories. Since 2014, the awards ceremony has been associated with the Satellite Masters Conference. The conference, which this year took place in Tallinn, Estonia and was a part of European Space Week, features an array of plenary sessions, workshops and roundtable discussions centred on leveraging satellite-derived data and other space solutions for business and society. It serves as a unique marketplace for sharing ideas on space-based innovation and connecting with the world’s leading network for downstream satellite businesses. 

      CENTRIP Features

      • Accurate dual system location
      • Location tagging
      • Boundary setting
      • Band removal alert
      • Water resistant
      • View and track your GPS tracker in real time (optional)
      • Records full GNSS history for all journeys, showing addresses of locations visited and time spent at locations (optional)
      • Used by care-givers and families
      • Geo fencing (perimeter alert)
      • Movement alerts and warnings

       

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link the article back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      Winner of ‘EU at 60 – Space for Europe’ Special Prize helps keep kids safe

      Winner of ‘EU at 60 – Space for Europe’ Special Prize helps keep kids safe

      10.11.2017 12:15  
      ESNC GSA special prize
      Published: 
      09 November 2017

      Kids are unpredictable and easily distracted – and any parent or teacher knows well how fast a kid can simply wander off. In fact, whenever a teacher takes a group of students outside the classroom, such as to go on a field trip, one of their greatest challenges – and causes of stress – is trying to keep track of everyone. There are simply too many tragedies that begin with a child wandering away from the group to not do everything possible to minimise this risk.

      Now, thanks to the CENTRIP early warning system, teachers can utilise GNSS-enabled technology to constantly track and locate each individual student.

      Giving teachers another set of eyes

      The winner of this year’s GSA ‘EU at 60 – Space for Europe’ Special Prize at the European Satellite Navigation Conference (ESNC), CENTRIP (ChildrEN TRIp Protector) was developed out of the ESA/JRC summer school on GNSS. The CENTRIP team is led by Ewa Kadziolka and includes Philipp Muller, Terri Richardson, Yahao Cheng and Niccolo Gastaldello. “The idea behind CENTRIP is to increase the safety of children and lower the stress for teachers trying to keep track of a large group of students by using low-cost, easy to use technology,” she says. “For us, GNSS was clearly the way to go.”

      GSA Executive Director Carlos des Dorides commented that the GSA Special Prize winner focussed on the protection of Europe’s most valuable asset - its children. “It is one of the first GNSS tracking systems to offer an affordable solution for simultaneously tracking multiple people. Plus, it is designed to work indoors, outdoors and even underground on a metro, so it can be effective in all learning environments,” he said.

      CENTRIP combines GNSS (including Galileo) and ZigBee technology to set a geo-fence around a specified area. With the CENTRIP system, each child wears a lightweight, durable bracelet that contains a GNSS tracking device. Each teacher, on the other hand, is provided with an intuitive and easy-to-use device that helps track the location of each child.

      If a student strays away from the group and outside the specified area, both the student and the teacher receive alerts. The audio alert on the child’s wristband is meant to get their attention, causing them to ‘look up’ and see that they’ve wandered away from the group, whereas the teacher’s alert shows the child’s location on the screen of their CENTRIP device. Using the tracking information, the teacher can then quickly and easily track and find the student before they wander out of sight. 

      Ready for every type of field trip

      According to Kadziolka, one of the key features of the device is its flexibility. “CENTRIP is designed to work indoors and outdoors and even underground on a metro, meaning it can be used in all learning environments,” she says. As a school group moves from, for example, the metro to a park and into a museum, the teacher can constantly adjust the parameters of the geo-fence based on the risk. “If a group is waiting for a metro, the teacher can keep the parameters within meters, but if they are in the park and they want to give the kids more freedom, the parameters can be easily expanded directly from their CENTRIP device.”

      Thanks to the system’s use of GNSS, CENTRIP also offers an array of helpful location-based information. “Based on the group’s location, CENTRIP can

      provide the teacher with the location of the closest hospital, a list of local emergency numbers and even stores where they can go and get necessary supplies,” explains Kadziolka. As an add-on feature, CENTRIP has the possibility to incorporate a SIM card, which adds an additional layer of protection so if a kid does happen to wander out of the system’s parameters, the teacher can still track their location using the same CENTRIP device.

      From idea to reality

      Ewa and the CENTRIP team now have the opportunity to make CENTRIP a reality. “We thought we had a good idea that could harness the power of European GNSS in order to keep kids safe,” she says. “Being awarded the Special Prize is a validation of the value that our idea will bring to schools across Europe and, hopefully someday, the world.”

      Thanks to the support provided by the 60 Years of EU Special Prize, the team is now set to develop their idea at a suitable incubation centre of their choice within the EU28 for six months, with the option of a six-month extension based on an evaluation after the first six-month period (a total value of up to EUR 40,000).

      About the GSA 60 Years of EU Prize

      In celebration of the 60th anniversary of the signing of the Treaty of Rome, which laid the foundation for building the EU, the GSA 60 Years of EU Special Prize focused on the contribution that Europe’s space programmes – and in particular European GNSS – make to European integration. The prize was awarded during last night’s (7 November 2017) annual European Satellite Navigation Competition (ESNC) and Copernicus Masters ceremony, Europe’s pre-eminent innovation competitions for space applications.

      The 2017 edition of the ESNC again received a remarkable number of entries. CENTRIP’s winning idea was competing against a total of 76 entries from 16 business sectors – including 28 start-ups, 11 SMEs, nine universities and 23 individuals.

      “According to the GSA’s 2017 Market Report, personal tracking devices will soon become the fastest growing market within the LBS sector – with many solutions using Galileo for enhanced performances,” says GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. “CENTRIP is following this trend. The concept is unique as there is no such solution on the market that monitors groups of children.”

      Des Dorides notes how the CENTRIP team is very motivated to enter the market. “They have a clear, convincing business plan that proves their aim to commercialise the product in the short term,” he adds. “In fact, CENTRIC already has potential customers, as some nurseries from Germany have expressed interest in wanting to implement the solution.”

      The annual event recognises the most outstanding applications for Copernicus and European GNSS (Galileo and EGNOS) in various categories. Since 2014, the awards ceremony has been associated with the Satellite Masters Conference. The conference, which this year took place in Tallinn, Estonia and was a part of European Space Week, features an array of plenary sessions, workshops and roundtable discussions centred on leveraging satellite-derived data and other space solutions for business and society. It serves as a unique marketplace for sharing ideas on space-based innovation and connecting with the world’s leading network for downstream satellite businesses. 

      CENTRIP Features

      • Accurate dual system location
      • Location tagging
      • Boundary setting
      • Band removal alert
      • Water resistant
      • View and track your GPS tracker in real time (optional)
      • Records full GNSS history for all journeys, showing addresses of locations visited and time spent at locations (optional)
      • Used by care-givers and families
      • Geo fencing (perimeter alert)
      • Movement alerts and warnings

       

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link the article back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      Winner of ‘EU at 60 – Space for Europe’ Special Prize helps keep kids safe

      EGNOS’s annual workshop captures state-of-play and state-of-the-art

      31.10.2017 10:04  
      Published: 
      31 October 2017

      The EGNOS Annual Workshop is an opportunity to catch up on the latest state-of-play and state-of-the-art in Europe’s satellite-based augmentation system (SBAS). Another year and again goals have been met, there are more and more users and EGNOS continues to forge forward in accuracy and reliability.

      The EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey 2016 shows that users were happy with EGNOS’s outstanding performance. The signal (Signal in Space) was available 100% of the time, with excellent monthly performance. Airport authorities spoke highly of the support offered to users, thanking for the speed of their response to any enquiries. GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides noted: “EGNOS has a good story to tell, we have 250 airports with more than 450 approach procedures.”

      EDAS, which delivers data to users who cannot always view the EGNOS’s satellites (such as in urban canyons) or to support a variety of other value added services, applications and research programmes also worked well, with almost 99% availability.

      Watch this: ESSP - EGNOS Satellite Navigation Systems

      The workshop offered a chance to hear from users. Dominic Hysam from Easyjet said EGNOS brings great benefits: “It provides precise guidance at airports where we don’t get that currently. It can provide precision approaches at secondary airports; this benefits us from a safety perspective and allows us to operate in different weather conditions, improving accessibility at those airports.” There is ever increasing pressure on airlines to deliver reliable services to their customers. Hysam added: “EGNOS means we are better at getting customers to where they want to go.”

      Alexander Desyllas of the Hellenic Civil Aviation Authority, which manages many airports, said: “We are encouraging all to adopt EGNOS now. It brings huge benefits, direct approaches and means not having to depend on conventional ground installations, this is a very important advantage.”

      Reaching out

      Other sectors are also reaping the benefits. Des Dorides said: “Even if civil aviation is the main natural-market segment, it is proving to be more and more valuable for other sectors, such as maritime and rail. Next year there will be a new regulation coming into place requiring EGNOS and Galileo capability on all new cars produced in Europe.”

      Seventy-five percent of maritime receiver models are now SBAS enabled – in the agricultural sector, 80% of European GNSS enabled tractors are using EGNOS.

      Reaching further

      EGNOS is also reaching further afield. EGNOS technology has been made available to South Korea, to develop its own KASS system and related services. Julien Lapie, who works for the Agency for Air Navigation Safety in Africa and Madagascar (ASECNA), which manages a major part of the African and Indian Ocean airspace, said that EGNOS will bring huge benefits to flight efficiency and safety. Lapie said that this lent itself particularly well to airports in remote areas with difficult access, due to the unrequired local ground infrastructure and staff.

      What next?

      The GSA and EGNOS never stand still, Des Dorides said: “In the year ahead, we will start with a major technology development that will bring dual-frequency use; and the overlay on Galileo which will bring even more robust and accurate use. This will be ready in 2023-2025.”

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      The EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey 2016 shows users are happy with EGNOS’s outstanding performance

      EGNOS’ annual workshop captures state-of-play and state-of-the-art

      31.10.2017 10:04  
      Published: 
      31 October 2017

      The EGNOS Annual Workshop is an opportunity to catch up on the latest state-of-play and state-of-the-art in Europe’s satellite-based augmentation system (SBAS). Another year and again goals have been met, there are more and more users and EGNOS continues to forge forward in accuracy and reliability.

      The EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey 2016 shows that users were happy with EGNOS’ outstanding performance. The signal (Signal in Space) was available 100% of the time, with excellent monthly performance. Airport authorities spoke highly of the support offered to users, thanking for the speed of their response to any enquiries. GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides noted: “EGNOS has a good story to tell, we have 250 airports with more than 450 approach procedures.”

      EDAS, which delivers data to users who cannot always view the EGNOS’ satellites (such as in urban canyons) or to support a variety of other value added services, applications and research programmes also worked well, with almost 99% availability.

      Watch this: ESSP - EGNOS Satellite Navigation Systems

      The workshop offered a chance to hear from users. Dominic Hysam from Easyjet said EGNOS brings great benefits: “It provides precise guidance at airports where we don’t get that currently. It can provide precision approaches at secondary airports; this benefits us from a safety perspective and allows us to operate in different weather conditions, improving accessibility at those airports.” There is ever increasing pressure on airlines to deliver reliable services to their customers. Hysam added: “EGNOS means we are better at getting customers to where they want to go.”

      Alexander Desyllas of the Hellenic Civil Aviation Authority, which manages many airports, said: “We are encouraging all to adopt EGNOS now. It brings huge benefits, direct approaches and means not having to depend on conventional ground installations, this is a very important advantage.”

      Reaching out

      Other sectors are also reaping the benefits. Des Dorides said: “Even if civil aviation is the main natural-market segment, it is proving to be more and more valuable for other sectors, such as maritime and rail. Next year there will be a new regulation coming into place requiring EGNOS and Galileo capability on all new cars produced in Europe.”

      Seventy-five percent of maritime receiver models are now SBAS enabled – in the agricultural sector, 80% of European GNSS enabled tractors are using EGNOS.

      Reaching further

      EGNOS is also reaching further afield. EGNOS technology has been made available to South Korea, to develop its own KASS system and related services. Julien Lapie, who works for the Agency for Air Navigation Safety in Africa and Madagascar (ASECNA), which manages a major part of the African and Indian Ocean airspace, said that EGNOS will bring huge benefits to flight efficiency and safety. Lapie said that this lent itself particularly well to airports in remote areas with difficult access, due to the unrequired local ground infrastructure and staff.

      What next?

      The GSA and EGNOS never stand still, Des Dorides said: “In the year ahead, we will start with a major technology development that will bring dual-frequency use; and the overlay on Galileo which will bring even more robust and accurate use. This will be ready in 2023-2025.”

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      The EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey 2016 shows users are happy with EGNOS’s outstanding performance

      EGNOS’ annual workshop captures state-of-play and state-of-the-art

      31.10.2017 10:04  
      Published: 
      31 October 2017

      The EGNOS Annual Workshop is an opportunity to catch up on the latest state-of-play and state-of-the-art in Europe’s satellite-based augmentation system (SBAS). Another year and again goals have been met, there are more and more users and EGNOS continues to forge forward in accuracy and reliability.

      The EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey 2016 shows that users were happy with EGNOS’ outstanding performance. The signal (Signal in Space) was available 100% of the time, with excellent monthly performance. Airport authorities spoke highly of the support offered to users, thanking for the speed of their response to any enquiries. GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides noted: “EGNOS has a good story to tell, we have 250 airports with more than 450 approach procedures.”

      EDAS, which delivers data to users who cannot always view the EGNOS’ satellites (such as in urban canyons) or to support a variety of other value added services, applications and research programmes also worked well, with almost 99% availability.

      Watch this: ESSP - EGNOS Satellite Navigation Systems

      The workshop offered a chance to hear from users. Dominic Hysam from Easyjet said EGNOS brings great benefits: “It provides precise guidance at airports where we don’t get that currently. It can provide precision approaches at secondary airports; this benefits us from a safety perspective and allows us to operate in different weather conditions, improving accessibility at those airports.” There is ever increasing pressure on airlines to deliver reliable services to their customers. Hysam added: “EGNOS means we are better at getting customers to where they want to go.”

      Alexander Desyllas of the Hellenic Civil Aviation Authority, which manages many airports, said: “We are encouraging all to adopt EGNOS now. It brings huge benefits, direct approaches and means not having to depend on conventional ground installations, this is a very important advantage.”

      Reaching out

      Other sectors are also reaping the benefits. Des Dorides said: “Even if civil aviation is the main natural-market segment, it is proving to be more and more valuable for other sectors, such as maritime and rail. Next year there will be a new regulation coming into place requiring EGNOS and Galileo capability on all new cars produced in Europe.”

      Seventy-five percent of maritime receiver models are now SBAS enabled – in the agricultural sector, 80% of European GNSS enabled tractors are using EGNOS.

      Reaching further

      EGNOS is also reaching further afield. EGNOS technology has been made available to South Korea, to develop its own KASS system and related services. Julien Lapie, who works for the Agency for Air Navigation Safety in Africa and Madagascar (ASECNA), which manages a major part of the African and Indian Ocean airspace, said that EGNOS will bring huge benefits to flight efficiency and safety. Lapie said that this lent itself particularly well to airports in remote areas with difficult access, due to the unrequired local ground infrastructure and staff.

      What next?

      The GSA and EGNOS never stand still, Des Dorides said: “In the year ahead, we will start with a major technology development that will bring dual-frequency use; and the overlay on Galileo which will bring even more robust and accurate use. This will be ready in 2023-2025.”

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      The EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey 2016 shows users are happy with EGNOS’s outstanding performance

      Last chance to start your Space3ac adventure and apply for financial support

      30.10.2017 11:41  
      Published: 
      30 October 2017

      The latest recruitment drive for Space3ac, a three-month acceleration programme for start-ups using satellite technologies to create solutions for the intermodal transportation, oil and gas and insurance sectors, is set to end at midnight on Tuesday, 31 October 2017. Interested start-ups with capabilities to solve problems provided by industry partners should “raise their hands” and register (by filling out a short form) on the programme’s website. The recruitment process will continue with interviews and meetings on 20-21 November.

      The Space3ac programme aims to solve problems experienced by transportation, oil and gas and insurance industry stakeholders by connecting them to start-ups with new ideas based on Earth observation, GNSS, telecommunications or integrated applications. In addition to PLN 200 000 (EUR 47,000) in cash, the start-ups will receive access to over 40 international technical and business mentors, be given a place to develop their business ideas, and be introduced to investors from all over the world.

      Basic space industry knowledge required

      The programme is looking for teams that have an early prototype or minimum viable product (MVP) of their solution, with a technology readiness level of at least 2. The teams should also have at least basic knowledge of the space industry and downstream sector and include experts with multidisciplinary skills. You can find all of the terms and conditions for participation here.

      Some of the more than 30 problems that the start-ups will aim to resolve include designing and implementing an intelligent monitoring system for the electrical power system at the Port of Gdynia; intelligent surveillance of safe navigation in the inner harbour of the Port of Gdansk; and an IT system allowing the handling of wheeled vehicle transport for OT Logistics, among others. The full list of problems to be solved is available on the website.

      In the second call, the programme has money to support 13 start-ups. Initially, at least 18 will be invited to take part in the programme and, after the first month of the acceleration phase a decision will be made on which teams can advance further. The selected projects will work for three months to develop their business, after which they will have an opportunity to pitch their ideas and attract investors to develop their business further.

      For more information, check out the programme’s website.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      Space3ac gives start-ups working with EO, GNSS and integrated applications access to international mentors and investors and the opportunity to develop their business.

      Last chance to start your Space3ac adventure and apply for financial support

      30.10.2017 11:41  
      Published: 
      30 October 2017

      The latest recruitment drive for Space3ac, a three-month acceleration programme for start-ups using satellite technologies to create solutions for the intermodal transportation, oil and gas and insurance sectors, is set to end at midnight on Tuesday, 31 October 2017. Interested start-ups with capabilities to solve problems provided by industry partners should “raise their hands” and register (by filling out a short form) on the programme’s website. The recruitment process will continue with interviews and meetings on 20-21 November.

      The Space3ac programme aims to solve problems experienced by transportation, oil and gas and insurance industry stakeholders by connecting them to start-ups with new ideas based on Earth observation, GNSS, telecommunications or integrated applications. In addition to PLN 200 000 (EUR 47,000) in cash, the start-ups will receive access to over 40 international technical and business mentors, be given a place to develop their business ideas, and be introduced to investors from all over the world.

      Basic space industry knowledge required

      The programme is looking for teams that have an early prototype or minimum viable product (MVP) of their solution, with a technology readiness level of at least 2. The teams should also have at least basic knowledge of the space industry and downstream sector and include experts with multidisciplinary skills. You can find all of the terms and conditions for participation here.

      Some of the more than 30 problems that the start-ups will aim to resolve include designing and implementing an intelligent monitoring system for the electrical power system at the Port of Gdynia; intelligent surveillance of safe navigation in the inner harbour of the Port of Gdansk; and an IT system allowing the handling of wheeled vehicle transport for OT Logistics, among others. The full list of problems to be solved is available on the website.

      In the second call, the programme has money to support 13 start-ups. Initially, at least 18 will be invited to take part in the programme and, after the first month of the acceleration phase a decision will be made on which teams can advance further. The selected projects will work for three months to develop their business, after which they will have an opportunity to pitch their ideas and attract investors to develop their business further.

      For more information, check out the programme’s website.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      Space3ac gives start-ups working with EO, GNSS and integrated applications access to international mentors and investors and the opportunity to develop their business.

      Last chance to start your Space3ac adventure and apply for financial support

      30.10.2017 11:41  
      Published: 
      30 October 2017

      The latest recruitment drive for Space3ac, a three-month acceleration programme for start-ups using satellite technologies to create solutions for the intermodal transportation, oil and gas and insurance sectors, is set to end at midnight on Friday, November 3. Interested start-ups with capabilities to solve problems provided by industry partners should “raise their hands” and register (by filling out a short form) on the programme’s website. The recruitment process will continue with interviews and meetings on 20-21 November.

      The Space3ac programme aims to solve problems experienced by transportation, oil and gas and insurance industry stakeholders by connecting them to start-ups with new ideas based on Earth observation, GNSS, telecommunications or integrated applications. In addition to PLN 200 000 (EUR 47,000) in cash, the start-ups will receive access to over 40 international technical and business mentors, be given a place to develop their business ideas, and be introduced to investors from all over the world.

      Basic space industry knowledge required

      The programme is looking for teams that have an early prototype or minimum viable product (MVP) of their solution, with a technology readiness level of at least 2. The teams should also have at least basic knowledge of the space industry and downstream sector and include experts with multidisciplinary skills. You can find all of the terms and conditions for participation here.

      Some of the more than 30 problems that the start-ups will aim to resolve include designing and implementing an intelligent monitoring system for the electrical power system at the Port of Gdynia; intelligent surveillance of safe navigation in the inner harbour of the Port of Gdansk; and an IT system allowing the handling of wheeled vehicle transport for OT Logistics, among others. The full list of problems to be solved is available on the website.

      In the second call, the programme has money to support 13 start-ups. Initially, at least 18 will be invited to take part in the programme and, after the first month of the acceleration phase a decision will be made on which teams can advance further. The selected projects will work for three months to develop their business, after which they will have an opportunity to pitch their ideas and attract investors to develop their business further.

      For more information, check out the programme’s website.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      Space3ac gives start-ups working with EO, GNSS and integrated applications access to international mentors and investors and the opportunity to develop their business.

      Last chance to start your Space3ac adventure and apply for financial support

      30.10.2017 11:41  
      Published: 
      30 October 2017

      The latest recruitment drive for Space3ac, a three-month acceleration programme for start-ups using satellite technologies to create solutions for the intermodal transportation, oil and gas and insurance sectors, is set to end at midnight on Tuesday, October 31. Interested start-ups with capabilities to solve problems provided by industry partners should “raise their hands” and register (by filling out a short form) on the programme’s website. The recruitment process will continue with interviews and meetings on 20-21 November.

      The Space3ac programme aims to solve problems experienced by transportation, oil and gas and insurance industry stakeholders by connecting them to start-ups with new ideas based on Earth observation, GNSS, telecommunications or integrated applications. In addition to PLN 200 000 (EUR 47,000) in cash, the start-ups will receive access to over 40 international technical and business mentors, be given a place to develop their business ideas, and be introduced to investors from all over the world.

      Basic space industry knowledge required

      The programme is looking for teams that have an early prototype or minimum viable product (MVP) of their solution, with a technology readiness level of at least 2. The teams should also have at least basic knowledge of the space industry and downstream sector and include experts with multidisciplinary skills. You can find all of the terms and conditions for participation here.

      Some of the more than 30 problems that the start-ups will aim to resolve include designing and implementing an intelligent monitoring system for the electrical power system at the Port of Gdynia; intelligent surveillance of safe navigation in the inner harbour of the Port of Gdansk; and an IT system allowing the handling of wheeled vehicle transport for OT Logistics, among others. The full list of problems to be solved is available on the website.

      In the second call, the programme has money to support 13 start-ups. Initially, at least 18 will be invited to take part in the programme and, after the first month of the acceleration phase a decision will be made on which teams can advance further. The selected projects will work for three months to develop their business, after which they will have an opportunity to pitch their ideas and attract investors to develop their business further.

      For more information, check out the programme’s website.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      Space3ac gives start-ups working with EO, GNSS and integrated applications access to international mentors and investors and the opportunity to develop their business.

      GNSS raw measurements set to be a game changer

      25.10.2017 13:47  
      Published: 
      25 October 2017

      Are GNSS raw measurements in consumer devices just a playground for scientists, or do they represent a real market opportunity? This was the question posed by the GSA’s Raw Measurements Task Force at a panel discussion on the topic held 28 September at ION GNSS+ in Portland, Oregon (USA). 

      With a smartphone featuring Android 7.0 (i.e., Nougat), users now have access to raw GNSS measurements – opening the door to higher-accuracy and the development of algorithms once restricted to more advanced GNSS receivers. This new capability also allows users to fully benefit from the special features offered by Galileo and to efficiently combine these features with other constellations. 

      According to Google’s Frank van Diggelen, the first beneficiaries are the phone manufacturers: using the raw measurements with analysis tools provided by Google, the manufacturers can analyse GNSS performance in new phone designs. “GNSS raw measurements also create new opportunities for developers and users,” he said during his opening remarks. “The challenge is to innovate using raw measurements and not simply repeating position velocity and time calculation already done at the GNSS chip.” Along this line, he noted that Google is set to rollout a range of new tools with the specific purpose of using raw measurements for easier and more powerful data analysis.

      Raw Measurements Task Force takes the reins

      Although the availability of raw measurements was eagerly anticipated by the GNSS community, their use has remained limited to testing by GNSS experts. To help get a better understanding of this feature’s true potential and to promote its use to application developers, the GSA established the Raw Measurements Task Force.

      “The purpose of the task force is to explore the real business opportunities of having access to GNSS raw measurements,” said NSL General Manager and Task Force member Mark Dumville. “It is open to all interested parties who share our goal of supporting both the GNSS and developer communities in using raw measurements for innovative commercial and societal applications.”

      The Task Force is currently working on a White Paper explaining how GNSS raw measurements can be used to optimise the calculation of position, how they can be best corrected, and how they can create opportunities for innovative applications.

      “It is our intent that this White Paper will be the de facto international reference for accessing and using raw measurements,” added Dumville. “The paper’s contents will include information on how to use the measurements, best practices, case studies and early examples of applications benefiting from processing raw measurements on Android devices.”

      The White Paper, which is currently in draft form, will also provide an outlook on the future use of raw measurements.  

      Successful testing

      In addition to its theoretical work, the Task Force is also busy performing tests on the mobile hardware that is already enabled for processing raw measurements. The purpose of these tests is to assess both current and future performance of the raw measurements. “Initial results are encouraging, as performance in optimal environments can achieve metre-level accuracy using different techniques,” explained the University of Nottingham’s Lukasz Bonenberg, who is also a Task Force member. 

      According to Bonenberg, realistic scenario testing has identified two key limitations: linearly polarised antenna and duty cycles on GNSS chipsets, both of which limit the use of carrier phase observations – a requirement for achieving sub-metre accuracy. However, he assured the panel that solutions are possible. Bonenberg also confirmed that those devices capable of using raw measurements should be able to take advantage of the additional layer of integrity and robustness that the measurements provide.

      That being said, Bonenberg doesn’t see positioning enhancement as being the most important raw measurement application. “An extra layer of security, jamming detection or crowdsourcing are just some of the out-of-the-box solutions that are now possible thanks to raw measurements,” he said. “Developers should not try to beat chipset manufacturers at accuracy, but instead focus on using existing knowledge to introduce new and more flexible solutions and services.”

      Opportunity for Galileo

      To demonstrate the role of Galileo within the use of GNSS raw measurements, Astrium’s Moises Navarro pointed to a recent experiment involving two PVT solutions. Although both solutions were based on raw measurements coming from a smartphone, only one included Galileo measurements. “Thanks to the raw measurements, users can select which constellations the PVT uses and which satellites are filtered out,” he explained to the panel. “However, by opting to include Galileo in the PVT solution through the raw measurements, users can easily experience the added accuracy and availability it provides.” 

      Moises also explained how raw measurements enables other GNSS differentiators. “For example, Galileo’s Open Service Authentication is a unique feature not found in other GNSS constellations,” he added. “Since this navigation message is included in raw measurements, developers can use this feature to authenticate navigation messages.”   

      Playground or Market Opportunity?

      “Clearly, raw measurements have the potential to unlock new GNSS innovations,” concluded GSA Deputy Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani, who moderated the workshop. “More so, Galileo has much to offer, including the E5 second frequency and the Open Service Authentication – both of which will be game-changers for autonomous applications and location-based applications.”

      So, the question remains: are raw measurements simply a playground for scientists or do they in fact represent a real market opportunity? According to those at the ION GNSS+ panel discussion, there isn’t any doubt that the answer is clearly the latter.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      The GSA led a panel discussion on the market potential of GNSS raw measurements at last month’s ION GNSS+ in Portland, Oregon (USA).

      GNSS raw measurements set to be a game changer

      25.10.2017 13:47  
      Published: 
      25 October 2017

      Are GNSS raw measurements in consumer devices just a playground for scientists, or do they represent a real market opportunity? This was the question posed by the GSA’s Raw Measurements Task Force at a panel discussion on the topic held 28 September at ION GNSS+ in Portland, Oregon (USA). 

      With a smartphone featuring Android 7.0 (i.e., Nougat), users now have access to raw GNSS measurements – opening the door to higher-accuracy and the development of algorithms once restricted to more advanced GNSS receivers. This new capability also allows users to fully benefit from the special features offered by Galileo and to efficiently combine these features with other constellations. 

      According to Google’s Frank van Diggelen, the first beneficiaries are the phone manufacturers: using the raw measurements with analysis tools provided by Google, the manufacturers can analyse GNSS performance in new phone designs. “GNSS raw measurements also create new opportunities for developers and users,” he said during his opening remarks. “The challenge is to innovate using raw measurements and not simply repeating position velocity and time calculation already done at the GNSS chip.” Along this line, he noted that Google is set to rollout a range of new tools with the specific purpose of using raw measurements for easier and more powerful data analysis.

      Raw Measurements Task Force takes the reins

      Although the availability of raw measurements was eagerly anticipated by the GNSS community, their use has remained limited to testing by GNSS experts. To help get a better understanding of this feature’s true potential and to promote its use to application developers, the GSA established the Raw Measurements Task Force.

      “The purpose of the task force is to explore the real business opportunities of having access to GNSS raw measurements,” said NSL General Manager and Task Force member Mark Dumville. “It is open to all interested parties who share our goal of supporting both the GNSS and developer communities in using raw measurements for innovative commercial and societal applications.”

      The Task Force is currently working on a White Paper explaining how GNSS raw measurements can be used to optimise the calculation of position, how they can be best corrected, and how they can create opportunities for innovative applications.

      “It is our intent that this White Paper will be the de facto international reference for accessing and using raw measurements,” added Dumville. “The paper’s contents will include information on how to use the measurements, best practices, case studies and early examples of applications benefiting from processing raw measurements on Android devices.”

      The White Paper, which is currently in draft form, will also provide an outlook on the future use of raw measurements.  

      Successful testing

      In addition to its theoretical work, the Task Force is also busy performing tests on the mobile hardware that is already enabled for processing raw measurements. The purpose of these tests is to assess both current and future performance of the raw measurements. “Initial results are encouraging, as performance in optimal environments can achieve metre-level accuracy using different techniques,” explained the University of Nottingham’s Lukasz Bonenberg, who is also a Task Force member. 

      According to Bonenberg, realistic scenario testing has identified two key limitations: linearly polarised antenna and duty cycles on GNSS chipsets, both of which limit the use of carrier phase observations – a requirement for achieving sub-metre accuracy. However, he assured the panel that solutions are possible. Bonenberg also confirmed that those devices capable of using raw measurements should be able to take advantage of the additional layer of integrity and robustness that the measurements provide.

      That being said, Bonenberg doesn’t see positioning enhancement as being the most important raw measurement application. “An extra layer of security, jamming detection or crowdsourcing are just some of the out-of-the-box solutions that are now possible thanks to raw measurements,” he said. “Developers should not try to beat chipset manufacturers at accuracy, but instead focus on using existing knowledge to introduce new and more flexible solutions and services.”

      Opportunity for Galileo

      To demonstrate the role of Galileo within the use of GNSS raw measurements, Astrium’s Moises Navarro pointed to a recent experiment involving two PVT solutions. Although both solutions were based on raw measurements coming from a smartphone, only one included Galileo measurements. “Thanks to the raw measurements, users can select which constellations the PVT uses and which satellites are filtered out,” he explained to the panel. “However, by opting to include Galileo in the PVT solution through the raw measurements, users can easily experience the added accuracy and availability it provides.” 

      Moises also explained how raw measurements enables other GNSS differentiators. “For example, Galileo’s Open Service Authentication is a unique feature not found in other GNSS constellations,” he added. “Since this navigation message is included in raw measurements, developers can use this feature to authenticate navigation messages.”   

      Playground or Market Opportunity?

      “Clearly, raw measurements have the potential to unlock new GNSS innovations,” concluded GSA Deputy Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani, who moderated the workshop. “More so, Galileo has much to offer, including the E5 second frequency and the Open Service Authentication – both of which will be game-changers for autonomous applications and location-based applications.”

      So, the question remains: are raw measurements simply a playground for scientists or do they in fact represent a real market opportunity? According to those at the ION GNSS+ panel discussion, there isn’t any doubt that the answer is clearly the latter.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      The GSA led a panel discussion on the market potential of GNSS raw measurements at last month’s ION GNSS+ in Portland, Oregon (USA).

      GNSS raw measurements set to be a game changer

      25.10.2017 13:47  
      Published: 
      25 October 2017

      Are GNSS raw measurements in consumer devices just a playground for scientists, or do they represent a real market opportunity? This was the question posed by the GSA’s Raw Measurements Task Force at a panel discussion on the topic held 28 September at ION GNSS+ in Portland, Oregon (USA). 

      With a smartphone featuring Android 7.0 (i.e., Nougat), users now have access to raw GNSS measurements – opening the door to higher-accuracy and the development of algorithms once restricted to more advanced GNSS receivers. This new capability also allows users to fully benefit from the special features offered by Galileo and to efficiently combine these features with other constellations. 

      According to Google’s Frank van Diggelen, the first beneficiaries are the phone manufacturers: using the raw measurements with analysis tools provided by Google, the manufacturers can analyse GNSS performance in new phone designs. “GNSS raw measurements also create new opportunities for developers and users,” he said during his opening remarks. “The challenge is to innovate using raw measurements and not simply repeating position velocity and time calculation already done at the GNSS chip.” Along this line, he noted that Google is set to rollout a range of new tools with the specific purpose of using raw measurements for easier and more powerful data analysis.

      Raw Measurements Task Force takes the reins

      Although the availability of raw measurements was eagerly anticipated by the GNSS community, their use has remained limited to testing by GNSS experts. To help get a better understanding of this feature’s true potential and to promote its use to application developers, the GSA established the Raw Measurements Task Force.

      “The purpose of the task force is to explore the real business opportunities of having access to GNSS raw measurements,” said NSL General Manager and Task Force member Mark Dumville. “It is open to all interested parties who share our goal of supporting both the GNSS and developer communities in using raw measurements for innovative commercial and societal applications.”

      The Task Force is currently working on a White Paper explaining how GNSS raw measurements can be used to optimise the calculation of position, how they can be best corrected, and how they can create opportunities for innovative applications.

      “It is our intent that this White Paper will be the de facto international reference for accessing and using raw measurements,” added Dumville. “The paper’s contents will include information on how to use the measurements, best practices, case studies and early examples of applications benefiting from processing raw measurements on Android devices.”

      The White Paper, which is currently in draft form, will also provide an outlook on the future use of raw measurements.  

      Successful testing

      In addition to its theoretical work, the Task Force is also busy performing tests on the mobile hardware that is already enabled for processing raw measurements. The purpose of these tests is to assess both current and future performance of the raw measurements. “Initial results are encouraging, as performance in optimal environments can achieve metre-level accuracy using different techniques,” explained the University of Nottingham’s Lukasz Bonenberg, who is also a Task Force member. 

      According to Bonenberg, realistic scenario testing has identified two key limitations: linearly polarised antenna and duty cycles on GNSS chipsets, both of which limit the use of carrier phase observations – a requirement for achieving sub-metre accuracy. However, he assured the panel that solutions are possible. Bonenberg also confirmed that those devices capable of using raw measurements should be able to take advantage of the additional layer of integrity and robustness that the measurements provide.

      That being said, Bonenberg doesn’t see positioning enhancement as being the most important raw measurement application. “An extra layer of security, jamming detection or crowdsourcing are just some of the out-of-the-box solutions that are now possible thanks to raw measurements,” he said. “Developers should not try to beat chipset manufacturers at accuracy, but instead focus on using existing knowledge to introduce new and more flexible solutions and services.”

      Opportunity for Galileo

      To demonstrate the role of Galileo within the use of GNSS raw measurements, Astrium’s Moises Navarro pointed to a recent experiment involving two PVT solutions. Although both solutions were based on raw measurements coming from a smartphone, only one included Galileo measurements. “Thanks to the raw measurements, users can select which constellations the PVT uses and which satellites are filtered out,” he explained to the panel. “However, by opting to include Galileo in the PVT solution through the raw measurements, users can easily experience the added accuracy and availability it provides.” 

      Moises also explained how raw measurements enables other GNSS differentiators. “For example, Galileo’s Open Service Authentication is a unique feature not found in other GNSS constellations,” he added. “Since this navigation message is included in raw measurements, developers can use this feature to authenticate navigation messages.”   

      Playground or Market Opportunity?

      “Clearly, raw measurements have the potential to unlock new GNSS innovations,” concluded GSA Deputy Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani, who moderated the workshop. “More so, Galileo has much to offer, including the E5 second frequency and the Open Service Authentication – both of which will be game-changers for autonomous applications and location-based applications.”

      So, the question remains: are raw measurements simply a playground for scientists or do they in fact represent a real market opportunity? According to those at the ION GNSS+ panel discussion, there isn’t any doubt that the answer is clearly the latter.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      The GSA led a panel discussion on the market potential of GNSS raw measurements at last month’s ION GNSS+ in Portland, Oregon (USA).

      GNSS raw measurements set to be a game changer

      25.10.2017 13:47  
      Published: 
      25 October 2017

      Are GNSS raw measurements in consumer devices just a playground for scientists, or do they represent a real market opportunity? This was the question posed by the GSA’s Raw Measurements Task Force at a panel discussion on the topic held 28 September at ION GNSS+ in Portland, Oregon (USA). 

      With a smartphone featuring Android 7.0 (i.e., Nougat), users now have access to raw GNSS measurements – opening the door to higher-accuracy and the development of algorithms once restricted to more advanced GNSS receivers. This new capability also allows users to fully benefit from the special features offered by Galileo and to efficiently combine these features with other constellations. 

      According to Google’s Frank van Diggelen, the first beneficiaries are the phone manufacturers: using the raw measurements with analysis tools provided by Google, the manufacturers can analyse GNSS performance in new phone designs. “GNSS raw measurements also create new opportunities for developers and users,” he said during his opening remarks. “The challenge is to innovate using raw measurements and not simply repeating position velocity and time calculation already done at the GNSS chip.” Along this line, he noted that Google is set to rollout a range of new tools with the specific purpose of using raw measurements for easier and more powerful data analysis.

      Raw Measurements Task Force takes the reins

      Although the availability of raw measurements was eagerly anticipated by the GNSS community, their use has remained limited to testing by GNSS experts. To help get a better understanding of this feature’s true potential and to promote its use to application developers, the GSA established the Raw Measurements Task Force.

      “The purpose of the task force is to explore the real business opportunities of having access to GNSS raw measurements,” said NSL General Manager and Task Force member Mark Dumville. “It is open to all interested parties who share our goal of supporting both the GNSS and developer communities in using raw measurements for innovative commercial and societal applications.”

      The Task Force is currently working on a White Paper explaining how GNSS raw measurements can be used to optimise the calculation of position, how they can be best corrected, and how they can create opportunities for innovative applications.

      “It is our intent that this White Paper will be the de facto international reference for accessing and using raw measurements,” added Dumville. “The paper’s contents will include information on how to use the measurements, best practices, case studies and early examples of applications benefiting from processing raw measurements on Android devices.”

      The White Paper, which is currently in draft form, will also provide an outlook on the future use of raw measurements.  

      Successful testing

      In addition to its theoretical work, the Task Force is also busy performing tests on the mobile hardware that is already enabled for processing raw measurements. The purpose of these tests is to assess both current and future performance of the raw measurements. “Initial results are encouraging, as performance in optimal environments can achieve metre-level accuracy using different techniques,” explained the University of Nottingham’s Lukasz Bonenberg, who is also a Task Force member. 

      According to Bonenberg, realistic scenario testing has identified two key limitations: linearly polarised antenna and duty cycles on GNSS chipsets, both of which limit the use of carrier phase observations – a requirement for achieving sub-metre accuracy. However, he assured the panel that solutions are possible. Bonenberg also confirmed that those devices capable of using raw measurements should be able to take advantage of the additional layer of integrity and robustness that the measurements provide.

      That being said, Bonenberg doesn’t see positioning enhancement as being the most important raw measurement application. “An extra layer of security, jamming detection or crowdsourcing are just some of the out-of-the-box solutions that are now possible thanks to raw measurements,” he said. “Developers should not try to beat chipset manufacturers at accuracy, but instead focus on using existing knowledge to introduce new and more flexible solutions and services.”

      Opportunity for Galileo

      To demonstrate the role of Galileo within the use of GNSS raw measurements, Astrium’s Moises Navarro pointed to a recent experiment involving two PVT solutions. Although both solutions were based on raw measurements coming from a smartphone, only one included Galileo measurements. “Thanks to the raw measurements, users can select which constellations the PVT uses and which satellites are filtered out,” he explained to the panel. “However, by opting to include Galileo in the PVT solution through the raw measurements, users can easily experience the added accuracy and availability it provides.” 

      Moises also explained how raw measurements enables other GNSS differentiators. “For example, Galileo’s Open Service Authentication is a unique feature not found in other GNSS constellations,” he added. “Since this navigation message is included in raw measurements, developers can use this feature to authenticate navigation messages.”   

      Playground or Market Opportunity?

      “Clearly, raw measurements have the potential to unlock new GNSS innovations,” concluded GSA Deputy Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani, who moderated the workshop. “More so, Galileo has much to offer, including the E5 second frequency and the Open Service Authentication – both of which will be game-changers for autonomous applications and location-based applications.”

      So, the question remains: are raw measurements simply a playground for scientists or do they in fact represent a real market opportunity? According to those at the ION GNSS+ panel discussion, there isn’t any doubt that the answer is clearly the latter.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      “Clearly, raw measurements have the potential to unlock new GNSS innovations,” concluded GSA Deputy Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani, who moderated the workshop.

      GNSS raw measurements set to be a game changer

      25.10.2017 13:47  
      Published: 
      25 October 2017

      Are GNSS raw measurements in consumer devices just a playground for scientists, or do they represent a real market opportunity? This was the question posed by the GSA’s Raw Measurements Task Force at a panel discussion on the topic held 28 September at ION GNSS+ in Portland, Oregon (USA). 

      With a smartphone featuring Android 7.0 (i.e., Nougat), users now have access to raw GNSS measurements – opening the door to higher-accuracy and the development of algorithms once restricted to more advanced GNSS receivers. This new capability also allows users to fully benefit from the special features offered by Galileo and to efficiently combine these features with other constellations. 

      According to Google’s Frank van Diggelen, the first beneficiaries are the phone manufacturers: using the raw measurements with analysis tools provided by Google, the manufacturers can analyse GNSS performance in new phone designs. “GNSS raw measurements also create new opportunities for developers and users,” he said during his opening remarks. “The challenge is to innovate using raw measurements and not simply repeating position velocity and time calculation already done at the GNSS chip.” Along this line, he noted that Google is set to rollout a range of new tools with the specific purpose of using raw measurements for easier and more powerful data analysis.

      Raw Measurements Task Force takes the reins

      Although the availability of raw measurements was eagerly anticipated by the GNSS community, their use has remained limited to testing by GNSS experts. To help get a better understanding of this feature’s true potential and to promote its use to application developers, the GSA established the Raw Measurements Task Force.

      “The purpose of the task force is to explore the real business opportunities of having access to GNSS raw measurements,” said NSL General Manager and Task Force member Mark Dumville. “It is open to all interested parties who share our goal of supporting both the GNSS and developer communities in using raw measurements for innovative commercial and societal applications.”

      The Task Force is currently working on a White Paper explaining how GNSS raw measurements can be used to optimise the calculation of position, how they can be best corrected, and how they can create opportunities for innovative applications.

      “It is our intent that this White Paper will be the de facto international reference for accessing and using raw measurements,” added Dumville. “The paper’s contents will include information on how to use the measurements, best practices, case studies and early examples of applications benefiting from processing raw measurements on Android devices.”

      The White Paper, which is currently in draft form, will also provide an outlook on the future use of raw measurements.  

      Successful testing

      In addition to its theoretical work, the Task Force is also busy performing tests on the mobile hardware that is already enabled for processing raw measurements. The purpose of these tests is to assess both current and future performance of the raw measurements. “Initial results are encouraging, as performance in optimal environments can achieve metre-level accuracy using different techniques,” explained the University of Nottingham’s Lukasz Bonenberg, who is also a Task Force member. 

      According to Bonenberg, realistic scenario testing has identified two key limitations: linearly polarised antenna and duty cycles on GNSS chipsets, both of which limit the use of carrier phase observations – a requirement for achieving sub-metre accuracy. However, he assured the panel that solutions are possible. Bonenberg also confirmed that those devices capable of using raw measurements should be able to take advantage of the additional layer of integrity and robustness that the measurements provide.

      That being said, Bonenberg doesn’t see positioning enhancement as being the most important raw measurement application. “An extra layer of security, jamming detection or crowdsourcing are just some of the out-of-the-box solutions that are now possible thanks to raw measurements,” he said. “Developers should not try to beat chipset manufacturers at accuracy, but instead focus on using existing knowledge to introduce new and more flexible solutions and services.”

      Opportunity for Galileo

      To demonstrate the role of Galileo within the use of GNSS raw measurements, Astrium’s Moises Navarro pointed to a recent experiment involving two PVT solutions. Although both solutions were based on raw measurements coming from a smartphone, only one included Galileo measurements. “Thanks to the raw measurements, users can select which constellations the PVT uses and which satellites are filtered out,” he explained to the panel. “However, by opting to include Galileo in the PVT solution through the raw measurements, users can easily experience the added accuracy and availability it provides.” 

      Moises also explained how raw measurements enables other GNSS differentiators. “For example, Galileo’s Open Service Authentication is a unique feature not found in other GNSS constellations,” he added. “Since this navigation message is included in raw measurements, developers can use this feature to authenticate navigation messages.”   

      Playground or Market Opportunity?

      “Clearly, raw measurements have the potential to unlock new GNSS innovations,” concluded GSA Deputy Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani, who moderated the workshop. “More so, Galileo has much to offer, including the E5 second frequency and the Open Service Authentication – both of which will be game-changers for autonomous applications and location-based applications.”

      So, the question remains: are raw measurements simply a playground for scientists or do they in fact represent a real market opportunity? According to those at the ION GNSS+ panel discussion, there isn’t any doubt that the answer is clearly the latter.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      “Clearly, raw measurements have the potential to unlock new GNSS innovations,” concluded GSA Deputy Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani, who moderated the workshop.

      GNSS at the centre of a revolution in agriculture

      24.10.2017 10:10  
      Published: 
      24 October 2017

      The agriculture sector has gone through a series of evolutionary milestones, from mechanisation, through the green revolution, to precision farming. The current revolution in the agriculture sector is digital farming, in which information about weather, soil conditions and crop health is combined with network technology to allow farmers to optimise their systems and improve their productivity. In Europe, EGNSS (Galileo and EGNOS) is a key enabling technology underpinning this revolution.

      Digital farming, which was the central topic of the recent CEMA Farming 4.0 Summit in Brussels, describes the evolution of agriculture to become an inter-connected, knowledge-based production system that incorporates GNSS-enabled precision farming with intelligent networks and data management tools.

      The use of digital technology incorporated in modern farm equipment is opening up new business models and opportunities in the agricultural sector, providing farmers with an unprecedented level of knowledge about their crops, livestock and operations and making the sector more efficient and environmentally sustainable.

      Farmers quick to adopt EGNOS

      In his presentation at the summit, the theme of which was ‘Moving towards connected & sustainable agriculture in Europe’, GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides said that the agriculture sector had been one of the first to make use of GNSS technology and that currently 80% of automated tractors were EGNOS-enabled.

      He noted that the agricultural sector had gone through a series of evolutionary milestones, the most recent of which – precision farming and digital farming – are reliant on the guidance and monitoring capabilities offered by satellite technology: EGNSS and Copernicus. A recent milestone for Galileo – the market entry of a dual-frequency chipset - means that it is now even better placed to support the optimisation of farming operations.

      In September this year, the chipset manufacturer Broadcom announced the entry to market of a dual-frequency chip. Dual-frequency chipsets and receivers benefit from better accuracy, ionosphere error cancellation, and faster transition from code tracking to phase tracking, among other benefits.

      Galileo currently has more satellites operating in dual frequency than GPS. It also has a number of other features that can benefit the agriculture sector. “On the Open Signal, which can already be used by farmers, with single frequency Galileo was able to offer accuracy of 2.5 metres on the horizontal plane. However, with dual-frequency – as it does with EGNOS - the level of accuracy increases to sub-metre precision or 20-30 centimetres path-to-path,” des Dorides said. This level of navigational accuracy, combined with the Earth observation capabilities of Copernicus, supports real-time data analysis and in-field and inter-field optimisation in the agricultural sector, helping farmers to increase the productivity and sustainability of their operations. All of this will be complemented by a Galileo High Accuracy service by 2020, with FOC increasing the precision even more.

      Watch this: EGNOS in Agriculture

      Providing the viewpoint from farm equipment manufacturers, Thomas Böck, Chief Technology Officer at CLAAS, noted the importance of working with the GSA and with Galileo. He said that that there were a lot of opportunities for the industry and also for farmers themselves, in terms of increased profitability and sustainability, to be gained from this cooperation.

      Matthew Foster, Vice President for Agricultural Commercial Development at CNH Industrial, noted that take-up of auto-guidance systems by farmers had been high and that the next step would be to achieve the connectivity needed to reap the benefits from all the data currently being produced.  For this to happen, and to ensure that farmers continue to adopt digital technologies, it will be necessary to have a Common Agricultural Policy that facilitates investment in precision farming.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      GNSS technology supports the farm of the future, helping boost the environmental sustainability and economic competitiveness of the agriculture sector

      GNSS at the centre of a revolution in agriculture

      24.10.2017 10:10  
      Published: 
      24 October 2017

      The agriculture sector has gone through a series of evolutionary milestones, from mechanisation, through the green revolution, to precision farming. The current revolution in the agriculture sector is digital farming, in which information about weather, soil conditions and crop health is combined with network technology to allow farmers to optimise their systems and improve their productivity. In Europe, EGNSS (Galileo and EGNOS) is a key enabling technology underpinning this revolution.

      Digital farming, which was the central topic of the recent CEMA Farming 4.0 Summit in Brussels, describes the evolution of agriculture to become an inter-connected, knowledge-based production system that incorporates GNSS-enabled precision farming with intelligent networks and data management tools.

      The use of digital technology incorporated in modern farm equipment is opening up new business models and opportunities in the agricultural sector, providing farmers with an unprecedented level of knowledge about their crops, livestock and operations and making the sector more efficient and environmentally sustainable.

      Farmers quick to adopt EGNOS

      In his presentation at the summit, the theme of which was ‘Moving towards connected & sustainable agriculture in Europe’, GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides said that the agriculture sector had been one of the first to make use of GNSS technology and that currently 80% of automated tractors were EGNOS-enabled.

      He noted that the agricultural sector had gone through a series of evolutionary milestones, the most recent of which – precision farming and digital farming – are reliant on the guidance and monitoring capabilities offered by satellite technology: EGNSS and Copernicus. A recent milestone for Galileo – the market entry of a dual-frequency chipset - means that it is now even better placed to support the optimisation of farming operations.

      In September this year, the chipset manufacturer Broadcom announced the entry to market of a dual-frequency chip. Dual-frequency chipsets and receivers benefit from better accuracy, ionosphere error cancellation, and faster transition from code tracking to phase tracking, among other benefits.

      Galileo currently has more satellites operating in dual frequency than GPS. It also has a number of other features that can benefit the agriculture sector. “On the Open Signal, which can already be used by farmers, with single frequency Galileo was able to offer accuracy of 2.5 metres on the horizontal plane. However, with dual-frequency – as it does with EGNOS - the level of accuracy increases to sub-metre precision or 20-30 centimetres path-to-path,” des Dorides said. This level of navigational accuracy, combined with the Earth observation capabilities of Copernicus, supports real-time data analysis and in-field and inter-field optimisation in the agricultural sector, helping farmers to increase the productivity and sustainability of their operations. All of this will be complemented by a Galileo High Accuracy service by 2020, with FOC increasing the precision even more.

      Watch this: EGNOS in Agriculture

      Providing the viewpoint from farm equipment manufacturers, Thomas Böck, Chief Technology Officer at CLAAS, noted the importance of working with the GSA and with Galileo. He said that that there were a lot of opportunities for the industry and also for farmers themselves, in terms of increased profitability and sustainability, to be gained from this cooperation.

      Matthew Foster, Vice President for Agricultural Commercial Development at CNH Industrial, noted that take-up of auto-guidance systems by farmers had been high and that the next step would be to achieve the connectivity needed to reap the benefits from all the data currently being produced.  For this to happen, and to ensure that farmers continue to adopt digital technologies, it will be necessary to have a Common Agricultural Policy that facilitates investment in precision farming.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      GNSS technology supports the farm of the future, helping boost the environmental sustainability and economic competitiveness of the agriculture sector

      GNSS at the centre of a revolution in agriculture

      24.10.2017 10:10  
      Published: 
      24 October 2017

      The agriculture sector has gone through a series of evolutionary milestones, from mechanisation, through the green revolution, to precision farming. The current revolution in the agriculture sector is digital farming, in which information about weather, soil conditions and crop health is combined with network technology to allow farmers to optimise their systems and improve their productivity. In Europe, EGNSS (Galileo and EGNOS) is a key enabling technology underpinning this revolution.

      Digital farming, which was the central topic of the recent CEMA Farming 4.0 Summit in Brussels, describes the evolution of agriculture to become an inter-connected, knowledge-based production system that incorporates GNSS-enabled precision farming with intelligent networks and data management tools.

      The use of digital technology incorporated in modern farm equipment is opening up new business models and opportunities in the agricultural sector, providing farmers with an unprecedented level of knowledge about their crops, livestock and operations and making the sector more efficient and environmentally sustainable.

      Farmers quick to adopt EGNOS

      In his presentation at the summit, the theme of which was ‘Moving towards connected & sustainable agriculture in Europe’, GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides said that the agriculture sector had been one of the first to make use of GNSS technology and that currently 80% of automated tractors were EGNOS-enabled.

      He noted that the agricultural sector had gone through a series of evolutionary milestones, the most recent of which – precision farming and digital farming – are reliant on the guidance and monitoring capabilities offered by satellite technology: EGNSS and Copernicus. A recent milestone for Galileo – the market entry of a dual-frequency chipset - means that it is now even better placed to support the optimisation of farming operations.

      In September this year, the chipset manufacturer Broadcom announced the entry to market of a dual-frequency chip. Dual-frequency chipsets and receivers benefit from better accuracy, ionosphere error cancellation, and faster transition from code tracking to phase tracking, among other benefits.

      Galileo currently has more satellites operating in dual frequency than GPS. It also has a number of other features that can benefit the agriculture sector. “On the Open Signal, which can already be used by farmers, with single frequency Galileo was able to offer accuracy of 2.5 metres on the horizontal plane. However, with dual-frequency – as it does with EGNOS - the level of accuracy increases to sub-metre precision or 20-30 centimetres path-to-path,” des Dorides said. This level of navigational accuracy, combined with the Earth observation capabilities of Copernicus, supports real-time data analysis and in-field and inter-field optimisation in the agricultural sector, helping farmers to increase the productivity and sustainability of their operations. All of this will be complemented by a Galileo High Accuracy service by 2020, with FOC increasing the precision even more.

      Watch this: EGNOS in Agriculture

      Providing the viewpoint from farm equipment manufacturers, Thomas Böck, Chief Technology Officer at CLAAS, noted the importance of working with the GSA and with Galileo. He said that that there were a lot of opportunities for the industry and also for farmers themselves, in terms of increased profitability and sustainability, to be gained from this cooperation.

      Matthew Foster, Vice President for Agricultural Commercial Development at CNH Industrial, noted that take-up of auto-guidance systems by farmers had been high and that the next step would be to achieve the connectivity needed to reap the benefits from all the data currently being produced.  For this to happen, and to ensure that farmers continue to adopt digital technologies, it will be necessary to have a Common Agricultural Policy that facilitates investment in precision farming.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      GNSS technology supports the farm of the future, helping boost the environmental sustainability and economic competitiveness of the agriculture sector

      Galileo and Copernicus combine forces at InterGEO 2017

      20.10.2017 9:32  
      Published: 
      20 October 2017

      Europe's flagship space programmes, Galileo and Copernicus, shared a stand and a stage at this year's InterGEO event in Berlin.

      For the European GNSS Agency (GSA) and the European Commission, the aim of this year's joint appearance by Galileo and Copernicus at InterGEO 2017 was to highlight the powerful synergies that exist between the two services.

      "This is the first time we have shared a common stand at an event of this type," said GSA Market Development Officer Reinhard Blasi. "We in the GNSS community know a lot about Galileo already, but we may not know so much about Copernicus. This is Europe's earth observation and monitoring programme, which, like Galileo, delivers openly and freely in a wide range of application areas, with both operational data and information services."

      Blasi was speaking at the world's premier event for the geospatial industry, and the joint use of E-GNSS and Earth observation data certainly enables a number of applications of great interest to the mapping and surveying communities that gather at InterGEO. But there are also large numbers of potential value-added applications for the agriculture sector, for smart cities, road transport, maritime navigation, emergency/crisis management, utilities and many others.

      "These synergies exist in many market segments," Blasi said, "for example in biomass monitoring, hydrographical offshore surveying or border surveillance." He cited a specific example in the area of precision agriculture, where Copernicus can deliver very detailed information about soil humidity and composition, which can then be used to generate metre- and centimetre-level maps of soil parameters. Farmers can then overlay Galileo- and EGNOS-generated location maps to guide targeted irrigation and other operations in their fields.

      In the area of environmental management, Copernicus delivers key information on the state of forests, water quality and snow cover, while again Galileo and EGNOS provide precise guidance to specific areas of interest.

      Many applications

      The European Union is supporting a major initiative in the area of Smart Cities. Here, Copernicus can be of great use in the monitoring of urban growth, green areas, and land use, both legal and illegal, while European GNSS can be combined with this kind of information to help better understand the mobility habits of urban citizens.

      "For public authorities, combined Earth observation and GNSS information is really very valuable," said Blasi, "for urban planning, defining new urban corridors and infrastructure projects and supporting law enforcement. And all of these are just a few of the areas where Galileo and Copernicus can work together to provide something that is more powerful than either one by itself."

      At the joint Galileo/Copernicus stand in the InterGEo exhibition area, representatives from the German Aerospace Centre (DLR), including Alexandra Förster and Lena Schultz-Lieckfeld, as well as the GSA's Blasi, and Julia Ioannou of the Copernicus Support Office, provided more insights into what can be accomplished by combining Copernicus and Galileo data.

      There was also an array of representatives on hand from small and medium-sized companies that have been involved in Galileo initiatives, all ready to meet visitors and answer questions. For everyone involved in the two programmes, the experience of coming together and presenting, for the first time, a united front in a very large public forum, appeared to be productive and ultimately very rewarding.

      Blasi said that in the future the two programmes would be more likely to work together in this way. "Galileo and Copernicus really do complement each other," he said, "so it makes sense for us, the people who work on these programmes, to come together like this, to tell our stories and promote our work, which is really of great benefit to the public and industry."

      More good news for European GNSS

      GSA Market Development Innovation Officer Alina Hriscu also spoke at a special conference session at InterGEO, where she described in detail Galileo operational status as well as the state of play among GNSS receiver manufacturers and the wider GNSS market. She also expressed the Agency's great satisfaction with the recent launch by Broadcom of the world's first dual frequency GNSS receiver for smartphones.

      Broadcom Limited is a worldwide semiconductor leader, and its new receiver, the BCM47755, will provide, among other things, lane-level accuracy with minimal power consumption and will help to enable a new range of high-precision LBS applications.

      As the GSA has pointed out, Europe’s Galileo constellation is largely responsible for the expanded availability of L1/E1 and L5/E5 frequencies, making it possible to use both frequencies to compute position much more accurately.

      Special Galileo student prize awarded

      InterGEO 2017 was also the occasion to recognize the work of some outstanding young people, in the context of the CLGE Students Contest. Every year, the Council of European Geodetic Surveyors (CLGE) organises the contest aimed at rewarding research in various surveying-related areas.

      This year, as it has in previous years, the GSA sponsored a special prize for entries that show a dedicated use of Galileo, EGNOS or Copernicus. The winner, announced at InterGEO, was Sander Varbla from the Tallinn University of Technology in Estonia.

      Varbla's paper, entitled 'Assessment of marine geoid models by ship-borne GNSS profiles', presented the results of a 2016 marine gravity and GNSS campaign carried out on board the Estonian Maritime Administration survey vessel 'Jakob Prei' in the WestEstonian archipeligo.

      The prize, awarded by the GSA's Hriscu, came with a check for 1000 euros. After receiving the award and thanking the GSA and contest organisers, Varbla said, "This means a lot to me. It means that my work is valued and it makes a difference, and I'm really looking forward to continuing with this kind of research."

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      Joint use of E-GNSS and Earth observation data enables many applications of interest to the mapping and surveying communities.

      Galileo and Copernicus combine forces at InterGEO 2017

      20.10.2017 9:32  
      Published: 
      20 October 2017

      Europe's flagship space programmes, Galileo and Copernicus, shared a stand and a stage at this year's InterGEO event in Berlin.

      For the European GNSS Agency (GSA) and the European Commission, the aim of this year's joint appearance by Galileo and Copernicus at InterGEO 2017 was to highlight the powerful synergies that exist between the two services.

      "This is the first time we have shared a common stand at an event of this type," said GSA Market Development Officer Reinhard Blasi. "We in the GNSS community know a lot about Galileo already, but we may not know so much about Copernicus. This is Europe's earth observation and monitoring programme, which, like Galileo, delivers openly and freely in a wide range of application areas, with both operational data and information services."

      Blasi was speaking at the world's premier event for the geospatial industry, and the joint use of E-GNSS and Earth observation data certainly enables a number of applications of great interest to the mapping and surveying communities that gather at InterGEO. But there are also large numbers of potential value-added applications for the agriculture sector, for smart cities, road transport, maritime navigation, emergency/crisis management, utilities and many others.

      "These synergies exist in many market segments," Blasi said, "for example in biomass monitoring, hydrographical offshore surveying or border surveillance." He cited a specific example in the area of precision agriculture, where Copernicus can deliver very detailed information about soil humidity and composition, which can then be used to generate metre- and centimetre-level maps of soil parameters. Farmers can then overlay Galileo- and EGNOS-generated location maps to guide targeted irrigation and other operations in their fields.

      In the area of environmental management, Copernicus delivers key information on the state of forests, water quality and snow cover, while again Galileo and EGNOS provide precise guidance to specific areas of interest.

      Many applications

      The European Union is supporting a major initiative in the area of Smart Cities. Here, Copernicus can be of great use in the monitoring of urban growth, green areas, and land use, both legal and illegal, while European GNSS can be combined with this kind of information to help better understand the mobility habits of urban citizens.

      "For public authorities, combined Earth observation and GNSS information is really very valuable," said Blasi, "for urban planning, defining new urban corridors and infrastructure projects and supporting law enforcement. And all of these are just a few of the areas where Galileo and Copernicus can work together to provide something that is more powerful than either one by itself."

      At the joint Galileo/Copernicus stand in the InterGEo exhibition area, representatives from the German Aerospace Centre (DLR), including Alexandra Förster and Lena Schultz-Lieckfeld, as well as the GSA's Blasi, and Julia Ioannou of the Copernicus Support Office, provided more insights into what can be accomplished by combining Copernicus and Galileo data.

      There was also an array of representatives on hand from small and medium-sized companies that have been involved in Galileo initiatives, all ready to meet visitors and answer questions. For everyone involved in the two programmes, the experience of coming together and presenting, for the first time, a united front in a very large public forum, appeared to be productive and ultimately very rewarding.

      Blasi said that in the future the two programmes would be more likely to work together in this way. "Galileo and Copernicus really do complement each other," he said, "so it makes sense for us, the people who work on these programmes, to come together like this, to tell our stories and promote our work, which is really of great benefit to the public and industry."

      More good news for European GNSS

      GSA Market Development Innovation Officer Alina Hriscu also spoke at a special conference session at InterGEO, where she described in detail Galileo operational status as well as the state of play among GNSS receiver manufacturers and the wider GNSS market. She also expressed the Agency's great satisfaction with the recent launch by Broadcom of the world's first dual frequency GNSS receiver for smartphones.

      Broadcom Limited is a worldwide semiconductor leader, and its new receiver, the BCM47755, will provide, among other things, lane-level accuracy with minimal power consumption and will help to enable a new range of high-precision LBS applications.

      As the GSA has pointed out, Europe’s Galileo constellation is largely responsible for the expanded availability of L1/E1 and L5/E5 frequencies, making it possible to use both frequencies to compute position much more accurately.

      Special Galileo student prize awarded

      InterGEO 2017 was also the occasion to recognize the work of some outstanding young people, in the context of the CLGE Students Contest. Every year, the Council of European Geodetic Surveyors (CLGE) organises the contest aimed at rewarding research in various surveying-related areas.

      This year, as it has in previous years, the GSA sponsored a special prize for entries that show a dedicated use of Galileo, EGNOS or Copernicus. The winner, announced at InterGEO, was Sander Varbla from the Tallinn University of Technology in Estonia.

      Varbla's paper, entitled 'Assessment of marine geoid models by ship-borne GNSS profiles', presented the results of a 2016 marine gravity and GNSS campaign carried out on board the Estonian Maritime Administration survey vessel 'Jakob Prei' in the WestEstonian archipeligo.

      The prize, awarded by the GSA's Hriscu, came with a check for 1000 euros. After receiving the award and thanking the GSA and contest organisers, Varbla said, "This means a lot to me. It means that my work is valued and it makes a difference, and I'm really looking forward to continuing with this kind of research."

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      Joint use of E-GNSS and Earth observation data enables many applications of interest to the mapping and surveying communities.

      Galileo and Copernicus combine forces at InterGEO 2017

      20.10.2017 9:32  
      Published: 
      20 October 2017

      Europe's flagship space programmes, Galileo and Copernicus, shared a stand and a stage at this year's InterGEO event in Berlin.

      For the European GNSS Agency (GSA) and the European Commission, the aim of this year's joint appearance by Galileo and Copernicus at InterGEO 2017 was to highlight the powerful synergies that exist between the two services.

      "This is the first time we have shared a common stand at an event of this type," said GSA Market Development Officer Reinhard Blasi. "We in the GNSS community know a lot about Galileo already, but we may not know so much about Copernicus. This is Europe's earth observation and monitoring programme, which, like Galileo, delivers openly and freely in a wide range of application areas, with both operational data and information services."

      Blasi was speaking at the world's premier event for the geospatial industry, and the joint use of E-GNSS and Earth observation data certainly enables a number of applications of great interest to the mapping and surveying communities that gather at InterGEO. But there are also large numbers of potential value-added applications for the agriculture sector, for smart cities, road transport, maritime navigation, emergency/crisis management, utilities and many others.

      "These synergies exist in many market segments," Blasi said, "for example in biomass monitoring, hydrographical offshore surveying or border surveillance." He cited a specific example in the area of precision agriculture, where Copernicus can deliver very detailed information about soil humidity and composition, which can then be used to generate metre- and centimetre-level maps of soil parameters. Farmers can then overlay Galileo- and EGNOS-generated location maps to guide targeted irrigation and other operations in their fields.

      In the area of environmental management, Copernicus delivers key information on the state of forests, water quality and snow cover, while again Galileo and EGNOS provide precise guidance to specific areas of interest.

      Many applications

      The European Union is supporting a major initiative in the area of Smart Cities. Here, Copernicus can be of great use in the monitoring of urban growth, green areas, and land use, both legal and illegal, while European GNSS can be combined with this kind of information to help better understand the mobility habits of urban citizens.

      "For public authorities, combined Earth observation and GNSS information is really very valuable," said Blasi, "for urban planning, defining new urban corridors and infrastructure projects and supporting law enforcement. And all of these are just a few of the areas where Galileo and Copernicus can work together to provide something that is more powerful than either one by itself."

      At the joint Galileo/Copernicus stand in the InterGEo exhibition area, representatives from the German Aerospace Centre (DLR), including Alexandra Förster and Lena Schultz-Lieckfeld, as well as the GSA's Blasi, and Julia Ioannou of the Copernicus Support Office, provided more insights into what can be accomplished by combining Copernicus and Galileo data.

      There was also an array of representatives on hand from small and medium-sized companies that have been involved in Galileo initiatives, all ready to meet visitors and answer questions. For everyone involved in the two programmes, the experience of coming together and presenting, for the first time, a united front in a very large public forum, appeared to be productive and ultimately very rewarding.

      Blasi said that in the future the two programmes would be more likely to work together in this way. "Galileo and Copernicus really do complement each other," he said, "so it makes sense for us, the people who work on these programmes, to come together like this, to tell our stories and promote our work, which is really of great benefit to the public and industry."

      More good news for European GNSS

      GSA Market Development Innovation Officer Alina Hriscu also spoke at a special conference session at InterGEO, where she described in detail Galileo operational status as well as the state of play among GNSS receiver manufacturers and the wider GNSS market. She also expressed the Agency's great satisfaction with the recent launch by Broadcom of the world's first dual frequency GNSS receiver for smartphones.

      Broadcom Limited is a worldwide semiconductor leader, and its new receiver, the BCM47755, will provide, among other things, lane-level accuracy with minimal power consumption and will help to enable a new range of high-precision LBS applications.

      As the GSA has pointed out, Europe’s Galileo constellation is largely responsible for the expanded availability of L1/E1 and L5/E5 frequencies, making it possible to use both frequencies to compute position much more accurately.

      Special Galileo student prize awarded

      InterGEO 2017 was also the occasion to recognize the work of some outstanding young people, in the context of the CLGE Students Contest. Every year, the Council of European Geodetic Surveyors (CLGE) organises the contest aimed at rewarding research in various surveying-related areas.

      This year, as it has in previous years, the GSA sponsored a special prize for entries that show a dedicated use of Galileo, EGNOS or Copernicus. The winner, announced at InterGEO, was Sander Varbla from the Tallinn University of Technology in Estonia.

      Varbla's paper, entitled 'Assessment of marine geoid models by ship-borne GNSS profiles', presented the results of a 2016 marine gravity and GNSS campaign carried out on board the Estonian Maritime Administration survey vessel 'Jakob Prei' in the WestEstonian archipeligo.

      The prize, awarded by the GSA's Hriscu, came with a check for 1000 euros. After receiving the award and thanking the GSA and contest organisers, Varbla said, "This means a lot to me. It means that my work is valued and it makes a difference, and I'm really looking forward to continuing with this kind of research."

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      Joint use of E-GNSS and Earth observation data enables many applications of interest to the mapping and surveying communities.

      Don’t miss the 1st Galileo User Assembly set for November 28-29

      19.10.2017 15:32  
      Published: 
      20 October 2017

      The 1st Galileo User Assembly is set to take place in Madrid on November 28-29. The event will provide Galileo and EGNOS users with the opportunity to discuss their needs, share their experience and provide feedback on EGNSS performance.

      One year after the launch of Galileo Initial Services, in December 2016, EGNSS users will gather for the 1st Galileo User Assembly in Madrid this November. On the first day of the Assembly, Galileo and EGNOS users will participate in the first ever EGNSS User Consultation Platform (UCP), broken into four thematic groups - Transport, Mass Market, Professional and R&D. The participants in the thematic groups will then discuss their findings in a plenary session, to be held on the second day of the Assembly.

      Improving service delivery

      Participants in the event will be given a general update on the Galileo programme, along with presentations on Galileo Initial Services performance, the Galileo Services Roadmap and the Galileo User Interfaces. They will also have the opportunity to take part in the 2017 Galileo User Satisfaction Survey, through which the GSA aims to gain a better understanding of Galileo’s value to users, aiming at continuously improving service delivery. The User Consultation Platform will be covering both EGNOS and Galileo.

      Watch this: Galileo Initial Services

      The 1st Galileo User Assembly will be hosted by the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) at its premises in Madrid. The GSC provides an interface for the Galileo Open Service (OS), Commercial Service (CS) and Safety-of-Life (SoL) user communities, and participants in the Assembly will have the opportunity to tour the premises and to take part in a networking reception.

      You can pre-register to attend the 1st Galileo User Assembly here. Places are limited, so filling out the form does not guarantee a place. You will receive a confirmation via email once your request is processed.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      The 1st Galileo User Assembly will give users the chance to discuss their experience of using Galileo so far, and their needs for the future

      Don’t miss the 1st Galileo User Assembly set for November 28-29

      19.10.2017 15:32  

      The 1st Galileo User Assembly is set to take place in Madrid on November 28-29. The event will provide Galileo and EGNOS users with the opportunity to discuss their needs, share their experience and provide feedback on EGNSS performance.

      One year after the launch of Galileo Initial Services, in December 2016, EGNSS users will gather for the 1st Galileo User Assembly in Madrid this November. On the first day of the Assembly, Galileo and EGNOS users will participate in the first ever EGNSS User Consultation Platform (UCP), broken into four thematic groups - Transport, Mass Market, Professional and R&D. The participants in the thematic groups will then discuss their findings in a plenary session, to be held on the second day of the Assembly.

      Improving service delivery

      Participants in the event will be given a general update on the Galileo programme, along with presentations on Galileo Initial Services performance, the Galileo Services Roadmap and the Galileo User Interfaces. They will also have the opportunity to take part in the 2017 Galileo User Satisfaction Survey, through which the GSA aims to gain a better understanding of Galileo’s value to users, aiming at continuously improving service delivery. The User Consultation Platform will be covering both EGNOS and Galileo.

      Watch this: Galileo Initial Services

      The 1st Galileo User Assembly will be hosted by the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) at its premises in Madrid. The GSC provides an interface for the Galileo Open Service (OS), Commercial Service (CS) and Safety-of-Life (SoL) user communities, and participants in the Assembly will have the opportunity to tour the premises and to take part in a networking reception.

      You can pre-register to attend the 1st Galileo User Assembly here. Places are limited, so filling out the form does not guarantee a place. You will receive a confirmation via email once your request is processed.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      The 1st Galileo User Assembly will give users the chance to discuss their experience of using Galileo so far, and their needs for the future

      Don’t miss the 1st Galileo User Assembly set for November 28-29

      19.10.2017 15:32  
      Published: 
      20 October 2017

      The 1st Galileo User Assembly is set to take place in Madrid on November 28-29. The event will provide Galileo and EGNOS users with the opportunity to discuss their needs, share their experience and provide feedback on EGNSS performance.

      One year after the launch of Galileo Initial Services, in December 2016, EGNSS users will gather for the 1st Galileo User Assembly in Madrid this November. On the first day of the Assembly, Galileo and EGNOS users will participate in the first ever EGNSS User Consultation Platform (UCP), broken into four thematic groups - Transport, Mass Market, Professional and R&D. The participants in the thematic groups will then discuss their findings in a plenary session, to be held on the second day of the Assembly.

      Improving service delivery

      Participants in the event will be given a general update on the Galileo programme, along with presentations on Galileo Initial Services performance, the Galileo Services Roadmap and the Galileo User Interfaces. They will also have the opportunity to take part in the 2017 Galileo User Satisfaction Survey, through which the GSA aims to gain a better understanding of Galileo’s value to users, aiming at continuously improving service delivery. The User Consultation Platform will be covering both EGNOS and Galileo.

      Watch this: Galileo Initial Services

      The 1st Galileo User Assembly will be hosted by the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) at its premises in Madrid. The GSC provides an interface for the Galileo Open Service (OS), Commercial Service (CS) and Safety-of-Life (SoL) user communities, and participants in the Assembly will have the opportunity to tour the premises and to take part in a networking reception.

      You can pre-register to attend the 1st Galileo User Assembly here. Places are limited, so filling out the form does not guarantee a place. You will receive a confirmation via email once your request is processed.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      The 1st Galileo User Assembly will give users the chance to discuss their experience of using Galileo so far, and their needs for the future

      Don’t miss the 1st Galileo User Assembly set for November 28-29

      19.10.2017 15:32  

      The 1st Galileo User Assembly is set to take place in Madrid on November 28-29. The event will provide Galileo and EGNOS users with the opportunity to discuss their needs, share their experience and provide feedback on EGNSS performance.

      One year after the launch of Galileo Initial Services, in December 2016, EGNSS users will gather for the 1st Galileo User Assembly in Madrid this November. On the first day of the Assembly, Galileo and EGNOS users will participate in the first ever EGNSS User Consultation Platform (UCP), broken into four thematic groups - Transport, Mass Market, Professional and R&D. The participants in the thematic groups will then discuss their findings in a plenary session, to be held on the second day of the Assembly.

      Improving service delivery

      Participants in the event will be given a general update on the Galileo programme, along with presentations on Galileo Initial Services performance, the Galileo Services Roadmap and the Galileo User Interfaces. They will also have the opportunity to take part in the 2017 Galileo User Satisfaction Survey, through which the GSA aims to gain a better understanding of Galileo’s value to users, aiming at continuously improving service delivery. The User Consultation Platform will be covering both EGNOS and Galileo.

      Watch this: Galileo Initial Services

      The 1st Galileo User Assembly will be hosted by the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) at its premises in Madrid. The GSC provides an interface for the Galileo Open Service (OS), Commercial Service (CS) and Safety-of-Life (SoL) user communities, and participants in the Assembly will have the opportunity to tour the premises and to take part in a networking reception.

      You can pre-register to attend the 1st Galileo User Assembly here. Places are limited, so filling out the form does not guarantee a place. You will receive a confirmation via email once your request is processed.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      The 1st Galileo User Assembly will give users the chance to discuss their experience of using Galileo so far, and their needs for the future

      Don’t miss the 1st Galileo User Assembly set for November 28-29

      19.10.2017 15:32  
      Published: 
      20 October 2017

      The 1st Galileo User Assembly is set to take place in Madrid on November 28-29. The event will provide Galileo and EGNOS users with the opportunity to discuss their needs, share their experience and provide feedback on EGNSS performance.

      One year after the launch of Galileo Initial Services, in December 2016, EGNSS users will gather for the 1st Galileo User Assembly in Madrid this November. On the first day of the Assembly, Galileo and EGNOS users will participate in the first ever EGNSS User Consultation Platform (UCP), broken into four thematic groups - Transport, Mass Market, Professional and R&D. The participants in the thematic groups will then discuss their findings in a plenary session, to be held on the second day of the Assembly.

      Improving service delivery

      Participants in the event will be given a general update on the Galileo programme, along with presentations on Galileo Initial Services performance, the Galileo Services Roadmap and the Galileo User Interfaces. They will also have the opportunity to take part in the 2017 Galileo User Satisfaction Survey, through which the GSA aims to gain a better understanding of Galileo’s value to users, aiming at continuously improving service delivery. The User Consultation Platform will be covering both EGNOS and Galileo.

      Watch this: Galileo Initial Services

      The 1st Galileo User Assembly will be hosted by the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) at its premises in Madrid. The GSC provides an interface for the Galileo Open Service (OS), Commercial Service (CS) and Safety-of-Life (SoL) user communities, and participants in the Assembly will have the opportunity to tour the premises and to take part in a networking reception.

      You can pre-register to attend the 1st Galileo User Assembly here. Places are limited, so filling out the form does not guarantee a place. You will receive a confirmation via email once your request is processed.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      The 1st Galileo User Assembly will give users the chance to discuss their experience of using Galileo so far, and their needs for the future

      Don’t miss the 1st Galileo User Assembly set for November 28-29

      19.10.2017 15:32  

      The 1st Galileo User Assembly is set to take place in Madrid on November 28-29. The event will provide Galileo and EGNOS users with the opportunity to discuss their needs, share their experience and provide feedback on EGNSS performance.

      One year after the launch of Galileo Initial Services, in December 2016, EGNSS users will gather for the 1st Galileo User Assembly in Madrid this November. On the first day of the Assembly, Galileo and EGNOS users will participate in the first ever EGNSS User Consultation Platform (UCP), broken into four thematic groups - Transport, Mass Market, Professional and R&D. The participants in the thematic groups will then discuss their findings in a plenary session, to be held on the second day of the Assembly.

      Improving service delivery

      Participants in the event will be given a general update on the Galileo programme, along with presentations on Galileo Initial Services performance, the Galileo Services Roadmap and the Galileo User Interfaces. They will also have the opportunity to take part in the 2017 Galileo User Satisfaction Survey, through which the GSA aims to gain a better understanding of Galileo’s value to users, aiming at continuously improving service delivery. The User Consultation Platform will be covering both EGNOS and Galileo.

      Watch this: Galileo Initial Services

      The 1st Galileo User Assembly will be hosted by the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) at its premises in Madrid. The GSC provides an interface for the Galileo Open Service (OS), Commercial Service (CS) and Safety-of-Life (SoL) user communities, and participants in the Assembly will have the opportunity to tour the premises and to take part in a networking reception.

      You can pre-register to attend the 1st Galileo User Assembly here. Places are limited, so filling out the form does not guarantee a place. You will receive a confirmation via email once your request is processed.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      The 1st Galileo User Assembly will give users the chance to discuss their experience of using Galileo so far, and their needs for the future

      Don’t miss the 1st Galileo User Assembly set for November 28-29

      19.10.2017 15:32  
      Published: 
      20 October 2017

      The 1st Galileo User Assembly is set to take place in Madrid on November 28-29. The event will provide Galileo and EGNOS users with the opportunity to discuss their needs, share their experience and provide feedback on EGNSS performance.

      One year after the launch of Galileo Initial Services, in December 2016, EGNSS users will gather for the 1st Galileo User Assembly in Madrid this November. On the first day of the Assembly, Galileo and EGNOS users will participate in the first ever EGNSS User Consultation Platform (UCP), broken into four thematic groups - Transport, Mass Market, Professional and R&D. The participants in the thematic groups will then discuss their findings in a plenary session, to be held on the second day of the Assembly.

      Improving service delivery

      Participants in the event will be given a general update on the Galileo programme, along with presentations on Galileo Initial Services performance, the Galileo Services Roadmap and the Galileo User Interfaces. They will also have the opportunity to take part in the 2017 Galileo User Satisfaction Survey, through which the GSA aims to gain a better understanding of Galileo’s value to users, aiming at continuously improving service delivery. The User Consultation Platform will be covering both EGNOS and Galileo.

      Watch this: Galileo Initial Services

      The 1st Galileo User Assembly will be hosted by the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) at its premises in Madrid. The GSC provides an interface for the Galileo Open Service (OS), Commercial Service (CS) and Safety-of-Life (SoL) user communities, and participants in the Assembly will have the opportunity to tour the premises and to take part in a networking reception.

      You can pre-register to attend the 1st Galileo User Assembly here. Places are limited, so filling out the form does not guarantee a place. You will receive a confirmation via email once your request is processed.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      The 1st Galileo User Assembly will give users the chance to discuss their experience of using Galileo so far, and their needs for the future

      Galileo and Copernicus combine forces at InterGEO 2017

      17.10.2017 12:06  
      Published: 
      17 October 2017

      For the European GNSS Agency (GSA) and the European Commission, the aim of this year's joint appearance by Galileo and Copernicus at InterGEO 2017 was to highlight the powerful synergies that exist between the two services.

       

      "This is the first time we have shared a common stand at an event of this type," said GSA Market Development Officer Reinhard Blasi. "The GNSS community knows a lot about Galileo already, and is getting increasingly interested to know more about Copernicus. This is Europe's earth observation and monitoring programme, which, like Galileo, delivers openly and freely both operational data and information services impacting a wide range of application areas. "

       

      Blasi was speaking at the world's premier event for the geospatial industry, and the joint use of E-GNSS and earth observation data certainly enables many applications of great interest to the mapping and surveying communities that gather at InterGEO. But there are also large numbers of potential value-added applications for the agriculture sector, for smart cities, road transport, maritime navigation, emergency/crisis management, utilities and many others.

       

      Among the specific examples presented, a notable one is in the area of precision agriculture, where Copernicus can deliver detailed information about soil and plant condition, which can then be used to generate precise maps of parameters on the field. Farmers can then overlay Galileo- and EGNOS-generated location maps to guide targeted irrigation and other operations in their fields. "Synergies exist in many additional segments for example in biomass monitoring, hydrographical offshore surveying or border surveillance."

       

      In the area of environmental management, Copernicus delivers key information on the state of forests, water quality and snow cover, while again Galileo and EGNOS provide geo-tagging of samples as well as precise guidance to specific areas of interest.

       

      “It always boils down to the principle that Copernicus tells you what is around you while with EGNOS and Galileo you precisely know where you are.”

       

      Many applications

       

      The European Union is supporting a major initiative in the area of Smart Cities. Here, Copernicus can be of great use in the monitoring of urban growth, green areas, and land use, both legal and illegal, while European GNSS can be combined with this kind of information to help better understand the mobility habits of urban citizens.

       

      "For public authorities, combined Earth observation and GNSS information is really very valuable," said Blasi, "for urban planning, defining new urban corridors, monitoring land movements and infrastructure projects and supporting law enforcement. And all of these are just a few of the areas where Galileo and Copernicus can work together to provide something that is more powerful than either one by itself."

       

      At the joint Galileo/Copernicus stand in the InterGEo exhibition area, representatives from the German Aerospace Centre (DLR) the Copernicus Support Office, provided more insights into what can be accomplished by combining Copernicus and Galileo data.

       

      There was also an array of representatives on hand from small and medium-sized companies that have been involved in Galileo initiatives, all ready to meet visitors and answer questions. For everyone involved in the two programmes, the experience of coming together and presenting, for the first time, a united front in a very large public forum, appeared to be productive and ultimately very rewarding.

       

      Blasi said that in the future the two programmes would be more likely to work together in this way. "Galileo and Copernicus really do complement each other," he said, "so it makes sense for us, the people who work on these programmes, to come together like this, to tell our stories and promote our work, which is really of great benefit to the public and industry."

       

      The UNOOSA and GSA are preparing a report to be published shortly on the EGNSS-Copernicus synergies. The emphasis is on the impact of the joint usage of GNSS and Earth Observation may have to support the countries to reach the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). 

       

      More good news for European GNSS

       

      A special conference session at InterGEO allows describing in detail Galileo operational status as well as the state of play among GNSS receiver manufacturers and the wider GNSS market, including the recent launch by Broadcom of the world's first dual frequency GNSS receiver for smartphones.

       

      Broadcom Limited is a worldwide semiconductor leader, and its new chipset will provide, among other things, lane-level accuracy with minimal power consumption and will help to enable a new range of high-precision LBS applications.

       

      As the GSA has pointed out, Europe’s Galileo constellation is largely responsible for the expanded availability of L1/E1 and L5/E5 frequencies for mass market applications, making it possible to use both frequencies to compute position much more accurately.

       

      Special Galileo student prize awarded

       

      InterGEO 2017 was also the occasion to recognize the work of some outstanding young people, in the context of the CLGE Students Contest. Every year, the Council of European Geodetic Surveyors (CLGE) organises the contest aimed at rewarding research in various surveying-related areas.

       

      This year, as it has in previous years, the GSA sponsored a special prize for entries that show a dedicated use of Galileo, EGNOS and/or Copernicus. The winner, announced at InterGEO, was Sander Varbla from the Tallinn University of Technology in Estonia.

       

      Varbla's paper, entitled 'Assessment of marine geoid models by ship-borne GNSS profiles', presented the results of a 2016 marine gravity and GNSS campaign carried out on board the Estonian Maritime Administration survey vessel 'Jakob Prei' in the WestEstonian archipeligo.

       

      After receiving the award and thanking the GSA and contest organisers, Varbla said, "This means a lot to me. It means that my work is valued and it makes a difference, and I'm really looking forward to continuing with this kind of research."

       

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      Galileo and Copernicus combine forces at InterGEO 2017

      Updated Galileo Satellite Metadata now available

      16.10.2017 13:53  
      Published: 
      16 October 2017

      The European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) has published updated Galileo Satellite Metadata information on its web portal.

      The updated Metadata contains information on the properties of both Galileo IOV (In-Orbit Validation) and Galileo FOC (Full Operational Capability) satellites, including:

      • Physical characteristics (mass, area of reflectivity, etc.)
      • Attitude law
      • Antenna parameters (Phase Centre Offsets (PCOs), Phase Centre Variations (PCVs)

      This information is required to properly implement advanced processing algorithms for precise orbit determination or Precise Point Positioning (PPP). 

      The updated information can be found under the ‘Support to Developers’ tab in the Galileo Satellite Metadata section. 

      All questions and comments can be directed to the Galileo Helpdesk.

      About the GSC

      The GSC is run by the European GNSS Agency (GSA). It was created to act as an interface between the Galileo system and its end users. The aim of the GSC is to provide system users with relevant information on Galileo. Through the easy-to-use GSC web portal, Galileo users can access a Helpdesk dedicated to addressing a wide range of questions on the status of Galileo and its use. The GSC also actively provides support to R&D and industry from its centre of expertise, as well as hosts workshops and training sessions.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      The updated Metadata contains information on the properties of both Galileo IOV (In-Orbit Validation) and Galileo FOC (Full Operational Capability) satellites.

      Updated Galileo Satellite Metadata now available

      16.10.2017 13:53  
      Published: 
      16 October 2017

      The European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) has published updated Galileo Satellite Metadata information on its web portal.

      The updated Metadata contains information on the properties of both Galileo IOV (In-Orbit Validation) and Galileo FOC (Full Operational Capability) satellites, including:

      • Physical characteristics (mass, area of reflectivity, etc.)
      • Attitude law
      • Antenna parameters (Phase Centre Offsets (PCOs), Phase Centre Variations (PCVs)

      This information is required to properly implement advanced processing algorithms for precise orbit determination or Precise Point Positioning (PPP). 

      The updated information can be found under the ‘Support to Developers’ tab in the Galileo Satellite Metadata section. 

      All questions and comments can be directed to the Galileo Helpdesk.

      About the GSC

      The GSC is run by the European GNSS Agency (GSA). It was created to act as an interface between the Galileo system and its end users. The aim of the GSC is to provide system users with relevant information on Galileo. Through the easy-to-use GSC web portal, Galileo users can access a Helpdesk dedicated to addressing a wide range of questions on the status of Galileo and its use. The GSC also actively provides support to R&D and industry from its centre of expertise, as well as hosts workshops and training sessions.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      The updated Metadata contains information on the properties of both Galileo IOV (In-Orbit Validation) and Galileo FOC (Full Operational Capability) satellites.

      Updated Galileo Satellite Metadata now available

      16.10.2017 13:53  
      Published: 
      16 October 2017

      The European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) has published updated Galileo Satellite Metadata information on its web portal.

      The updated Metadata contains information on the properties of both Galileo IOV (In-Orbit Validation) and Galileo FOC (Full Operational Capability) satellites, including:

      • Physical characteristics (mass, area of reflectivity, etc.)
      • Attitude law
      • Antenna parameters (Phase Centre Offsets (PCOs), Phase Centre Variations (PCVs)

      This information is required to properly implement advanced processing algorithms for precise orbit determination or Precise Point Positioning (PPP). 

      The updated information can be found under the ‘Support to Developers’ tab in the Galileo Satellite Metadata section. 

      All questions and comments can be directed to the Galileo Helpdesk.

      About the GSC

      The GSC is run by the European GNSS Agency (GSA). It was created to act as an interface between the Galileo system and its end users. The aim of the GSC is to provide system users with relevant information on Galileo. Through the easy-to-use GSC web portal, Galileo users can access a Helpdesk dedicated to addressing a wide range of questions on the status of Galileo and its use. The GSC also actively provides support to R&D and industry from its centre of expertise, as well as hosts workshops and training sessions.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      The updated Metadata contains information on the properties of both Galileo IOV (In-Orbit Validation) and Galileo FOC (Full Operational Capability) satellites.

      Updated Galileo Satellite Metadata now available

      16.10.2017 13:53  
      Published: 
      16 October 2017

      The European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) has published updated Galileo Satellite Metadata information on its web portal.

      The updated Metadata contains information on the properties of both Galileo IOV (In-Orbit Validation) and Galileo FOC (Full Operational Capability) satellites, including:

      • Physical characteristics (mass, area of reflectivity, etc.)
      • Attitude law
      • Antenna parameters (Phase Centre Offsets (PCOs), Phase Centre Variations (PCVs)

      This information is required to properly implement advanced processing algorithms for precise orbit determination or Precise Point Positioning (PPP). 

      The updated information can be found under the ‘Support to Developers’ tab in the Galileo Satellite Metadata section. 

      All questions and comments can be directed to the Galileo Helpdesk.

      About the GSC

      The GSC is run by the European GNSS Agency (GSA). It was created to act as an interface between the Galileo system and its end users. The aim of the GSC is to provide system users with relevant information on Galileo. Through the easy-to-use GSC web portal, Galileo users can access a Helpdesk dedicated to addressing a wide range of questions on the status of Galileo and its use. The GSC also actively provides support to R&D and industry from its centre of expertise, as well as hosts workshops and training sessions.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      The updated Metadata contains information on the properties of both Galileo IOV (In-Orbit Validation) and Galileo FOC (Full Operational Capability) satellites.

      Precision farming becoming more and more important in modern agriculture

      12.10.2017 11:19  
      Published: 
      12 October 2017

      Agriculture faces significant challenges, there is ever-increasing pressure on profit margins and farmers are also trying to produce food in the most sustainable way possible.

      The AGRO SHOW in Bednary, near Poznan, is an opportunity for companies to showcase the latest technologies to help farmers work as efficiently as possible. Precision farming makes use of satellite technology allowing real-time management of crops, fields and animals. It helps to monitor and reduce the environmental impact of farming. This is underlined, for instance, by the “European Innovation Partnership for Agricultural Productivity and Sustainability (EIP-AGRI). This Partnership was launched in 2012 by the European Commission (DG AGRI) to contribute to the European Union's 'Europe 2020' strategy for smart, sustainable and inclusive growth, in which precision farming plays a key role.

      The Bednary show focuses on arable farming. Combining sensor technologies with software linked to EGNOS and Galileo allows farmers to monitor and react to what is happening on the ground. Sensors can pick up on water, nutrient and pesticide levels. The technology will identify where product is needed and the best way to deliver this on the ground. It is also used for seeding and harvesting.

      Most producers of agricultural vehicles have incorporated satellite receivers into their machinery to make sure they can offer the highest levels of productivity to farmers. We spoke to three companies to find out how they were making use of GNSS to help farmers.
      ‘Precision engineering is becoming more and more important in modern agriculture’

      Karl Wilhelm Hundertmark, CLAAS Polska, spoke about the role of precision machinery in agriculture, which he said is becoming more and more important. He said that machines were now installed with standard informatics tools that, for example, help to manage fuel consumption and carry out early diagnosis of machine faults. CLAAS, like many manufacturers, install EGNOS as standard in all their agricultural vehicles and for ploughing and spraying it is particularly useful. For seeding, further accuracy is needed, down to as little as two to three centimetres.

      Galileo enabled device for precision agriculture

      Jerzy Koronczok, Agrocom Polska presented the software developed in the course of the Geopal H2020 project, which can be accessed through any computer. This tool also requires a small Galileo enabled device. This little box (see photo) is useful to all farmers, including small farmers, as it can be added to older machinery. It works with a tablet or smart phone and is a cost-effective solution to digitally document all the farm’s machinery and equipment. Movement and location are easily monitored through the application, which makes use of Galileo satellite signals. Free of charge in its basic version, farmers can tailor it to their specific needs. Farmers can also decide which additional components they need to buy, so that they only pay for what they really need.

      ‘Customers can save a lot of money on all agriculture products through technology’

      Bogdan Kazimierczak, Product Sales Specialist with John Deere Polska, stood beside a large picture of a tractor on the moon! The image makes the point that precision farming tools use satellite information. Kazinierczak explained that these technologies save farmers a lot of money on fertilizers, pesticides and fuel. He said that even smaller farms of 75 hectares can make use of applications to help manage their properties as efficiently as possible.

      Kazinierczak says that there are also benefits for the environment. Precision agriculture can reduce the risk of excess chemicals going into the ground by making use of section controls. For example, in an area where chemicals can’t be used, the system will be shut off and no chemicals will be sprayed. So, developments in the agriculture sector are showing that, as highlighted in a European Parliament study on precision agriculture, “suitable services from GNSS developments (Galileo) as a key feature of Precision Agriculture are a priority, but also more easily available data from remote sensing programmes (Copernicus) can be a stimulant to improving Precision Agriculture applications.”

      So, it seems that exploiting the synergies between Galileo and Copernicus is the way forward for agriculture.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      Many agricultural machinery manufacturers install EGNOS as standard

      Precision farming becoming more and more important in modern agriculture

      12.10.2017 11:19  
      Published: 
      12 October 2017

      Agriculture faces significant challenges, there is ever-increasing pressure on profit margins and farmers are also trying to produce food in the most sustainable way possible.

      The AGRO SHOW in Bednary, near Poznan, is an opportunity for companies to showcase the latest technologies to help farmers work as efficiently as possible. Precision farming makes use of satellite technology allowing real-time management of crops, fields and animals. It helps to monitor and reduce the environmental impact of farming. This is underlined, for instance, by the “European Innovation Partnership for Agricultural Productivity and Sustainability (EIP-AGRI). This Partnership was launched in 2012 by the European Commission (DG AGRI) to contribute to the European Union's 'Europe 2020' strategy for smart, sustainable and inclusive growth, in which precision farming plays a key role.

      The Bednary show focuses on arable farming. Combining sensor technologies with software linked to EGNOS and Galileo allows farmers to monitor and react to what is happening on the ground. Sensors can pick up on water, nutrient and pesticide levels. The technology will identify where product is needed and the best way to deliver this on the ground. It is also used for seeding and harvesting.

      Most producers of agricultural vehicles have incorporated satellite receivers into their machinery to make sure they can offer the highest levels of productivity to farmers. We spoke to three companies to find out how they were making use of GNSS to help farmers.
      ‘Precision engineering is becoming more and more important in modern agriculture’

      Karl Wilhelm Hundertmark, CLAAS Polska, spoke about the role of precision machinery in agriculture, which he said is becoming more and more important. He said that machines were now installed with standard informatics tools that, for example, help to manage fuel consumption and carry out early diagnosis of machine faults. CLAAS, like many manufacturers, install EGNOS as standard in all their agricultural vehicles and for ploughing and spraying it is particularly useful. For seeding, further accuracy is needed, down to as little as two to three centimetres.

      Galileo enabled device for precision agriculture

      Jerzy Koronczok, Agrocom Polska presented the software developed in the course of the Geopal H2020 project, which can be accessed through any computer. This tool also requires a small Galileo enabled device. This little box (see photo) is useful to all farmers, including small farmers, as it can be added to older machinery. It works with a tablet or smart phone and is a cost-effective solution to digitally document all the farm’s machinery and equipment. Movement and location are easily monitored through the application, which makes use of Galileo satellite signals. Free of charge in its basic version, farmers can tailor it to their specific needs. Farmers can also decide which additional components they need to buy, so that they only pay for what they really need.

      ‘Customers can save a lot of money on all agriculture products through technology’

      Bogdan Kazimierczak, Product Sales Specialist with John Deere Polska, stood beside a large picture of a tractor on the moon! The image makes the point that precision farming tools use satellite information. Kazinierczak explained that these technologies save farmers a lot of money on fertilizers, pesticides and fuel. He said that even smaller farms of 75 hectares can make use of applications to help manage their properties as efficiently as possible.

      Kazinierczak says that there are also benefits for the environment. Precision agriculture can reduce the risk of excess chemicals going into the ground by making use of section controls. For example, in an area where chemicals can’t be used, the system will be shut off and no chemicals will be sprayed. So, developments in the agriculture sector are showing that, as highlighted in a European Parliament study on precision agriculture, “suitable services from GNSS developments (Galileo) as a key feature of Precision Agriculture are a priority, but also more easily available data from remote sensing programmes (Copernicus) can be a stimulant to improving Precision Agriculture applications.”

      So, it seems that exploiting the synergies between Galileo and Copernicus is the way forward for agriculture.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      Many agricultural machinery manufacturers install EGNOS as standard

      Precision farming becoming more and more important in modern agriculture

      12.10.2017 11:19  
      Published: 
      12 October 2017

      Agriculture faces significant challenges, there is ever-increasing pressure on profit margins and farmers are also trying to produce food in the most sustainable way possible.

      The AGRO SHOW in Bednary, near Poznan, is an opportunity for companies to showcase the latest technologies to help farmers work as efficiently as possible. Precision farming makes use of satellite technology allowing real-time management of crops, fields and animals. It helps to monitor and reduce the environmental impact of farming. This is underlined, for instance, by the “European Innovation Partnership for Agricultural Productivity and Sustainability (EIP-AGRI). This Partnership was launched in 2012 by the European Commission (DG AGRI) to contribute to the European Union's 'Europe 2020' strategy for smart, sustainable and inclusive growth, in which precision farming plays a key role.

      The Bednary show focuses on arable farming. Combining sensor technologies with software linked to EGNOS and Galileo allows farmers to monitor and react to what is happening on the ground. Sensors can pick up on water, nutrient and pesticide levels. The technology will identify where product is needed and the best way to deliver this on the ground. It is also used for seeding and harvesting.

      Most producers of agricultural vehicles have incorporated satellite receivers into their machinery to make sure they can offer the highest levels of productivity to farmers. We spoke to three companies to find out how they were making use of GNSS to help farmers.
      ‘Precision engineering is becoming more and more important in modern agriculture’

      Karl Wilhelm Hundertmark, CLAAS Polska, spoke about the role of precision machinery in agriculture, which he said is becoming more and more important. He said that machines were now installed with standard informatics tools that, for example, help to manage fuel consumption and carry out early diagnosis of machine faults. CLAAS, like many manufacturers, install EGNOS as standard in all their agricultural vehicles and for ploughing and spraying it is particularly useful. For seeding, further accuracy is needed, down to as little as two to three centimetres.

      Galileo enabled device for precision agriculture

      Jerzy Koronczok, Agrocom Polska presented the software developed in the course of the Geopal H2020 project, which can be accessed through any computer. This tool also requires a small Galileo enabled device. This little box (see photo) is useful to all farmers, including small farmers, as it can be added to older machinery. It works with a tablet or smart phone and is a cost-effective solution to digitally document all the farm’s machinery and equipment. Movement and location are easily monitored through the application, which makes use of Galileo satellite signals. Free of charge in its basic version, farmers can tailor it to their specific needs. Farmers can also decide which additional components they need to buy, so that they only pay for what they really need.

      ‘Customers can save a lot of money on all agriculture products through technology’

      Bogdan Kazimierczak, Product Sales Specialist with John Deere Polska, stood beside a large picture of a tractor on the moon! The image makes the point that precision farming tools use satellite information. Kazinierczak explained that these technologies save farmers a lot of money on fertilizers, pesticides and fuel. He said that even smaller farms of 75 hectares can make use of applications to help manage their properties as efficiently as possible.

      Kazinierczak says that there are also benefits for the environment. Precision agriculture can reduce the risk of excess chemicals going into the ground by making use of section controls. For example, in an area where chemicals can’t be used, the system will be shut off and no chemicals will be sprayed. So, developments in the agriculture sector are showing that, as highlighted in a European Parliament study on precision agriculture, “suitable services from GNSS developments (Galileo) as a key feature of Precision Agriculture are a priority, but also more easily available data from remote sensing programmes (Copernicus) can be a stimulant to improving Precision Agriculture applications.”

      So, it seems that exploiting the synergies between Galileo and Copernicus is the way forward for agriculture.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      Many agricultural machinery manufacturers install EGNOS as standard

      Precision farming becoming more and more important in modern agriculture

      12.10.2017 11:19  
      Published: 
      12 October 2017

      Agriculture faces significant challenges, there is ever-increasing pressure on profit margins and farmers are also trying to produce food in the most sustainable way possible.

      The AGRO SHOW in Bednary, near Poznan, is an opportunity for companies to showcase the latest technologies to help farmers work as efficiently as possible. Precision farming makes use of satellite technology allowing real-time management of crops, fields and animals. It helps to monitor and reduce the environmental impact of farming. This is underlined, for instance, by the “European Innovation Partnership for Agricultural Productivity and Sustainability (EIP-AGRI). This Partnership was launched in 2012 by the European Commission (DG AGRI) to contribute to the European Union's 'Europe 2020' strategy for smart, sustainable and inclusive growth, in which precision farming plays a key role.

      The Bednary show focuses on arable farming. Combining sensor technologies with software linked to EGNOS and Galileo allows farmers to monitor and react to what is happening on the ground. Sensors can pick up on water, nutrient and pesticide levels. The technology will identify where product is needed and the best way to deliver this on the ground. It is also used for seeding and harvesting.

      Most producers of agricultural vehicles have incorporated satellite receivers into their machinery to make sure they can offer the highest levels of productivity to farmers. We spoke to three companies to find out how they were making use of GNSS to help farmers.
      ‘Precision engineering is becoming more and more important in modern agriculture’

      Karl Wilhelm Hundertmark, CLAAS Polska, spoke about the role of precision machinery in agriculture, which he said is becoming more and more important. He said that machines were now installed with standard informatics tools that, for example, help to manage fuel consumption and carry out early diagnosis of machine faults. CLAAS, like many manufacturers, install EGNOS as standard in all their agricultural vehicles and for ploughing and spraying it is particularly useful. For seeding, further accuracy is needed, down to as little as two to three centimetres.

      Galileo enabled device for precision agriculture

      Jerzy Koronczok, Agrocom Polska presented the software developed in the course of the Geopal H2020 project, which can be accessed through any computer. This tool also requires a small Galileo enabled device. This little box (see photo) is useful to all farmers, including small farmers, as it can be added to older machinery. It works with a tablet or smart phone and is a cost-effective solution to digitally document all the farm’s machinery and equipment. Movement and location are easily monitored through the application, which makes use of Galileo satellite signals. Free of charge in its basic version, farmers can tailor it to their specific needs. Farmers can also decide which additional components they need to buy, so that they only pay for what they really need.

      ‘Customers can save a lot of money on all agriculture products through technology’

      Bogdan Kazimierczak, Product Sales Specialist with John Deere Polska, stood beside a large picture of a tractor on the moon! The image makes the point that precision farming tools use satellite information. Kazinierczak explained that these technologies save farmers a lot of money on fertilizers, pesticides and fuel. He said that even smaller farms of 75 hectares can make use of applications to help manage their properties as efficiently as possible.

      Kazinierczak says that there are also benefits for the environment. Precision agriculture can reduce the risk of excess chemicals going into the ground by making use of section controls. For example, in an area where chemicals can’t be used, the system will be shut off and no chemicals will be sprayed. So, developments in the agriculture sector are showing that, as highlighted in a European Parliament study on precision agriculture, “suitable services from GNSS developments (Galileo) as a key feature of Precision Agriculture are a priority, but also more easily available data from remote sensing programmes (Copernicus) can be a stimulant to improving Precision Agriculture applications.”

      So, it seems that exploiting the synergies between Galileo and Copernicus is the way forward for agriculture.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      Many agricultural machinery manufacturers install EGNOS as standard

      Precision farming becoming more and more important in modern agriculture

      12.10.2017 11:19  
      Published: 
      12 October 2017

      Agriculture faces significant challenges, there is ever-increasing pressure on profit margins and farmers are also trying to produce food in the most sustainable way possible.

      The AGRO SHOW in Bednary, near Poznan, is an opportunity for companies to showcase the latest technologies to help farmers work as efficiently as possible. Precision farming makes use of satellite technology allowing real-time management of crops, fields and animals. It helps to monitor and reduce the environmental impact of farming. This is underlined, for instance, by the “European Innovation Partnership for Agricultural Productivity and Sustainability (EIP-AGRI). This Partnership was launched in 2012 by the European Commission (DG AGRI) to contribute to the European Union's 'Europe 2020' strategy for smart, sustainable and inclusive growth, in which precision farming plays a key role.

      The Bednary show focuses on arable farming. Combining sensor technologies with software linked to EGNOS and Galileo allows farmers to monitor and react to what is happening on the ground. Sensors can pick up on water, nutrient and pesticide levels. The technology will identify where product is needed and the best way to deliver this on the ground. It is also used for seeding and harvesting.

      Most producers of agricultural vehicles have incorporated satellite receivers into their machinery to make sure they can offer the highest levels of productivity to farmers. We spoke to three companies to find out how they were making use of GNSS to help farmers.
      ‘Precision engineering is becoming more and more important in modern agriculture’

      Karl Wilhelm Hundertmark, CLAAS Polska, spoke about the role of precision machinery in agriculture, which he said is becoming more and more important. He said that machines were now installed with standard informatics tools that, for example, help to manage fuel consumption and carry out early diagnosis of machine faults. CLAAS, like many manufacturers, install EGNOS as standard in all their agricultural vehicles and for ploughing and spraying it is particularly useful. For seeding, further accuracy is needed, down to as little as two to three centimetres.

      Galileo enabled device for precision agriculture

      Jerzy Koronczok, Agrocom Polska presented the software developed in the course of the Geopal H2020 project, which can be accessed through any computer. This tool also requires a small Galileo enabled device. This little box (see photo) is useful to all farmers, including small farmers, as it can be added to older machinery. It works with a tablet or smart phone and is a cost-effective solution to digitally document all the farm’s machinery and equipment. Movement and location are easily monitored through the application, which makes use of Galileo satellite signals. Free of charge in its basic version, farmers can tailor it to their specific needs. Farmers can also decide which additional components they need to buy, so that they only pay for what they really need.

      ‘Customers can save a lot of money on all agriculture products through technology’

      Bogdan Kazimierczak, Product Sales Specialist with John Deere Polska, stood beside a large picture of a tractor on the moon! The image makes the point that precision farming tools use satellite information. Kazinierczak explained that these technologies save farmers a lot of money on fertilizers, pesticides and fuel. He said that even smaller farms of 75 hectares can make use of applications to help manage their properties as efficiently as possible.

      Kazinierczak says that there are also benefits for the environment. Precision agriculture can reduce the risk of excess chemicals going into the ground by making use of section controls. For example, in an area where chemicals can’t be used, the system will be shut off and no chemicals will be sprayed. So, developments in the agriculture sector are showing that, as highlighted in a European Parliament study on precision agriculture, “suitable services from GNSS developments (Galileo) as a key feature of Precision Agriculture are a priority, but also more easily available data from remote sensing programmes (Copernicus) can be a stimulant to improving Precision Agriculture applications.”

      So, it seems that exploiting the synergies between Galileo and Copernicus is the way forward for agriculture.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      Many agricultural machinery manufacturers install EGNOS as standard

      Be part of the EGNOS aviation services evolution

      6.10.2017 12:15  
      Published: 
      06 October 2017

      The European Commission (EC), Directorate-General for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs, is defining the roadmap for the evolution of the EGNOS programme beyond the EGNOS Service Releases of EGNOS V3 currently defined. Evolutions shall support the implementation of safer and more efficient aviation operations. In this sense, further evolutions of EGNOS services for aviation safety beyond 2025 could take any of the following three directions, either:

      (1)    Enlarge the provision of EGNOS services to Communication Navigation Surveillance (CNS) and Air Traffic Management (ATM) beyond navigation, notably to address surveillance (ADS-B) and possibly support timing services for communication systems; this approach is aligned with the vision of integrated CNS;

       (2)    Provide additional features to increase the robustness against external intentional or unintentional threats/attacks to the EGNOS navigation service, for instance by adding authentication to GNSS signals or ad hoc features at antenna and receiver level;

       (3)    Enhance the navigation, positioning and/or timing performance provided at user level, for instance by improving the vertical position accuracy and the time-to-alert to enable supporting Cat-II approach procedures.

      The aims are to analyse and define the reasons motivating evolutions along those three axes beyond 2025, determine constraints and pre-requisites, and assess the added value to end users. The analysis shall consider each area separately and determine under what condition it would be beneficial for the programme to implement these services. The analysis shall focus on:

      (1)    Identifying user requirements for each of these new services and how they translate into service requirements for EGNOS;

       (2)    Defining the associated regulatory constraints and safety analyses required before the service can be implemented operationally;

      (3)    Analysing the added value for aviation end users and defining how the service could be provided, to enable a programmatic decision on which service should be implemented as a priority.

      The study will be fully financed by the European Commission under the Horizon 2020 framework programme for research and innovation, within the budget allocated to the evolution of the EGNOS mission. The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is in charge of the technical supervision of the project on behalf of the European Commission.

      More information about the invitation to tender can be found here.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      Be part of the EGNOS aviation services evolution

      Be part of the EGNOS aviation services evolution

      6.10.2017 12:15  
      Published: 
      06 October 2017

      The European Commission (EC), Directorate-General for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs, is defining the roadmap for the evolution of the EGNOS programme beyond the EGNOS Service Releases of EGNOS V3 currently defined. Evolutions shall support the implementation of safer and more efficient aviation operations. In this sense, further evolutions of EGNOS services for aviation safety beyond 2025 could take any of the following three directions, either:

      (1)    Enlarge the provision of EGNOS services to Communication Navigation Surveillance (CNS) and Air Traffic Management (ATM) beyond navigation, notably to address surveillance (ADS-B) and possibly support timing services for communication systems; this approach is aligned with the vision of integrated CNS;

       (2)    Provide additional features to increase the robustness against external intentional or unintentional threats/attacks to the EGNOS navigation service, for instance by adding authentication to GNSS signals or ad hoc features at antenna and receiver level;

       (3)    Enhance the navigation, positioning and/or timing performance provided at user level, for instance by improving the vertical position accuracy and the time-to-alert to enable supporting Cat-II approach procedures.

      The aims are to analyse and define the reasons motivating evolutions along those three axes beyond 2025, determine constraints and pre-requisites, and assess the added value to end users. The analysis shall consider each area separately and determine under what condition it would be beneficial for the programme to implement these services. The analysis shall focus on:

      (1)    Identifying user requirements for each of these new services and how they translate into service requirements for EGNOS;

       (2)    Defining the associated regulatory constraints and safety analyses required before the service can be implemented operationally;

      (3)    Analysing the added value for aviation end users and defining how the service could be provided, to enable a programmatic decision on which service should be implemented as a priority.

      The study will be fully financed by the European Commission under the Horizon 2020 framework programme for research and innovation, within the budget allocated to the evolution of the EGNOS mission. The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is in charge of the technical supervision of the project on behalf of the European Commission.

      More information about the invitation to tender can be found here.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      Be part of the EGNOS aviation services evolution

      Be part of the EGNOS aviation services evolution

      6.10.2017 12:15  
      Published: 
      06 October 2017

      The European Commission (EC), Directorate-General for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs, is defining the roadmap for the evolution of the EGNOS programme beyond the EGNOS Service Releases of EGNOS V3 currently defined. Evolutions shall support the implementation of safer and more efficient aviation operations. In this sense, further evolutions of EGNOS services for aviation safety beyond 2025 could take any of the following three directions, either:

      • (1)    Enlarge the provision of EGNOS services to Communication Navigation Surveillance (CNS) and Air Traffic Management (ATM) beyond navigation, notably to address surveillance (ADS-B) and possibly support timing services for communication systems; this approach is aligned with the vision of integrated CNS;
      • (2)    Provide additional features to increase the robustness against external intentional or unintentional threats/attacks to the EGNOS navigation service, for instance by adding authentication to GNSS signals or ad hoc features at antenna and receiver level;
      • (3)    Enhance the navigation, positioning and/or timing performance provided at user level, for instance by reducing the vertical position accuracy and the time-to-alert to enable supporting Cat-II approach procedures.

      The aims are to analyse and define the reasons motivating evolutions along those three axes beyond 2025, determine constraints and pre-requisites, and assess the added value to end users. The analysis shall consider each area separately and determine under what condition it would be beneficial for the programme to implement these services. The analysis shall focus on:

      • (1)    Identifying user requirements for each of these new services and how they translate into service requirements for EGNOS;
      • (2)    Defining the associated regulatory constraints and safety analyses required before the service can be implemented operationally;
      • (3)    Analysing the added value for aviation end users and defining how the service could be provided, to enable a programmatic decision on which service should be implemented as a priority.

      The study will be fully financed by the European Commission under the Horizon 2020 framework programme for research and innovation, within the budget allocated to the evolution of the EGNOS mission. The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is in charge of the technical supervision of the project on behalf of the European Commission.

      More information about the ITT can be found here.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      Be part of the EGNOS aviation services evolution

      Be part of the EGNOS aviation services evolution

      6.10.2017 12:15  
      Published: 
      06 October 2017

      The European Commission (EC), Directorate-General for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs, is defining the roadmap for the evolution of the EGNOS programme beyond the EGNOS Service Releases of EGNOS V3 currently defined. Evolutions shall support the implementation of safer and more efficient aviation operations. In this sense, further evolutions of EGNOS services for aviation safety beyond 2025 could take any of the following three directions, either:

      (1)    Enlarge the provision of EGNOS services to Communication Navigation Surveillance (CNS) and Air Traffic Management (ATM) beyond navigation, notably to address surveillance (ADS-B) and possibly support timing services for communication systems; this approach is aligned with the vision of integrated CNS;

       (2)    Provide additional features to increase the robustness against external intentional or unintentional threats/attacks to the EGNOS navigation service, for instance by adding authentication to GNSS signals or ad hoc features at antenna and receiver level;

       (3)    Enhance the navigation, positioning and/or timing performance provided at user level, for instance by reducing the vertical position accuracy and the time-to-alert to enable supporting Cat-II approach procedures.

      The aims are to analyse and define the reasons motivating evolutions along those three axes beyond 2025, determine constraints and pre-requisites, and assess the added value to end users. The analysis shall consider each area separately and determine under what condition it would be beneficial for the programme to implement these services. The analysis shall focus on:

      (1)    Identifying user requirements for each of these new services and how they translate into service requirements for EGNOS;

       (2)    Defining the associated regulatory constraints and safety analyses required before the service can be implemented operationally;

      (3)    Analysing the added value for aviation end users and defining how the service could be provided, to enable a programmatic decision on which service should be implemented as a priority.

      The study will be fully financed by the European Commission under the Horizon 2020 framework programme for research and innovation, within the budget allocated to the evolution of the EGNOS mission. The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is in charge of the technical supervision of the project on behalf of the European Commission.

      More information about the invitation to tender can be found here.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      Be part of the EGNOS aviation services evolution

      Be part of the EGNOS aviation services evolution

      6.10.2017 12:15  
      Published: 
      06 October 2017

      The European Commission (EC), Directorate-General for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs, is defining the roadmap for the evolution of the EGNOS programme beyond the EGNOS Service Releases of EGNOS V3 currently defined. Evolutions shall support the implementation of safer and more efficient aviation operations. In this sense, further evolutions of EGNOS services for aviation safety beyond 2025 could take any of the following three directions, either:

      (1)    Enlarge the provision of EGNOS services to Communication Navigation Surveillance (CNS) and Air Traffic Management (ATM) beyond navigation, notably to address surveillance (ADS-B) and possibly support timing services for communication systems; this approach is aligned with the vision of integrated CNS;

       (2)    Provide additional features to increase the robustness against external intentional or unintentional threats/attacks to the EGNOS navigation service, for instance by adding authentication to GNSS signals or ad hoc features at antenna and receiver level;

       (3)    Enhance the navigation, positioning and/or timing performance provided at user level, for instance by improving the vertical position accuracy and the time-to-alert to enable supporting Cat-II approach procedures.

      The aims are to analyse and define the reasons motivating evolutions along those three axes beyond 2025, determine constraints and pre-requisites, and assess the added value to end users. The analysis shall consider each area separately and determine under what condition it would be beneficial for the programme to implement these services. The analysis shall focus on:

      (1)    Identifying user requirements for each of these new services and how they translate into service requirements for EGNOS;

       (2)    Defining the associated regulatory constraints and safety analyses required before the service can be implemented operationally;

      (3)    Analysing the added value for aviation end users and defining how the service could be provided, to enable a programmatic decision on which service should be implemented as a priority.

      The study will be fully financed by the European Commission under the Horizon 2020 framework programme for research and innovation, within the budget allocated to the evolution of the EGNOS mission. The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is in charge of the technical supervision of the project on behalf of the European Commission.

      More information about the invitation to tender can be found here.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      Be part of the EGNOS aviation services evolution

      Be part of the EGNOS aviation services evolution

      6.10.2017 12:15  
      Published: 
      06 October 2017

      The European Commission (EC), Directorate-General for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs, is defining the roadmap for the evolution of the EGNOS programme beyond the EGNOS Service Releases of EGNOS V3 currently defined. Evolutions shall support the implementation of safer and more efficient aviation operations. In this sense, further evolutions of EGNOS services for aviation safety beyond 2025 could take any of the following three directions, either:

      (1)    Enlarge the provision of EGNOS services to Communication Navigation Surveillance (CNS) and Air Traffic Management (ATM) beyond navigation, notably to address surveillance (ADS-B) and possibly support timing services for communication systems; this approach is aligned with the vision of integrated CNS;

       (2)    Provide additional features to increase the robustness against external intentional or unintentional threats/attacks to the EGNOS navigation service, for instance by adding authentication to GNSS signals or ad hoc features at antenna and receiver level;

       (3)    Enhance the navigation, positioning and/or timing performance provided at user level, for instance by improving the vertical position accuracy and the time-to-alert to enable supporting Cat-II approach procedures.

      The aims are to analyse and define the reasons motivating evolutions along those three axes beyond 2025, determine constraints and pre-requisites, and assess the added value to end users. The analysis shall consider each area separately and determine under what condition it would be beneficial for the programme to implement these services. The analysis shall focus on:

      (1)    Identifying user requirements for each of these new services and how they translate into service requirements for EGNOS;

       (2)    Defining the associated regulatory constraints and safety analyses required before the service can be implemented operationally;

      (3)    Analysing the added value for aviation end users and defining how the service could be provided, to enable a programmatic decision on which service should be implemented as a priority.

      The study will be fully financed by the European Commission under the Horizon 2020 framework programme for research and innovation, within the budget allocated to the evolution of the EGNOS mission. The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is in charge of the technical supervision of the project on behalf of the European Commission.

      More information about the invitation to tender can be found here.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      Be part of the EGNOS aviation services evolution

      Time is of the essence

      5.10.2017 10:23  
      Published: 
      05 October 2017

      To identify timing service needs that are not yet being met by the EGNSS basic time service, the ‘DEMonstrator of EGNSS services based on Time Reference Architecture’ (DEMETRA) project developed a prototype of an EGNSS-based time disseminator that provides time certification, redundancy, resilience, integrity, and improved accuracy, while validating the concept of ‘time as a service’.

      The overarching goal of the DEMETRA project was to promote the use of EGNSS (EGNOS and Galileo) by enhancing and augmenting its timing service characteristics. To ensure that the needs of timing and synchronisation users were incorporated into the project design, the developers engaged with these end-users to design a system to demonstrate new or advanced timing services based on a common infrastructure that is scalable, robust, and continuously monitored.

      Nine different time services were developed and integrated in the demonstrator, with varying degrees of technical and commercial maturity, based on the European GNSS basic timing service, which was complemented by other independent time transfer technologies. The services tested were:

      1. Time Broadcasting over TV/Radio Links;
      2. Certified Trusted Time Distribution using the Network Time Protocol (NTP);
      3. Time & Frequency Distribution over Optical Link;
      4. Time & Frequency Distribution via GEO Satellite;
      5. User GNSS Receiver Calibration;
      6. Certified Time Steering;
      7. Time Monitoring and Steering;
      8. Time Integrity; and an
      9. All-in-one Time Synchronisation Solution.

      These services could become the basis for European timing standards, making timing of critical European infrastructure independent from GPS and fostering the dissemination of EGNSS-based common standardised time services throughout Europe.

      Watch this: DEMETRA: Time as a Service

      Main features

      The project demonstrated the feasibility of delivering early EGNSS timing services to end users by utilising an operational prototype of a Galileo Time Services Provider (TSP) which could provide timing products to the Galileo system while also providing additional time services to other external customers.

      The demonstrator was built around the concept of a common core infrastructure hosting advanced time services and delivering common services. These include time services monitoring, reference time, managing a centralised TSP database, and offering public and private web services such as the provision of TSP information for the general public and usage data and KPI for subscribed users. The demonstrator was deployed as an open and scalable architecture with common interfaces, making it easier to integrate new time services in the future.

      This allows service developers to focus on performance at user level.

      Galileo Time Services Provider

      An eye on the market

      There is significant untapped potential on the market for timing services, with some users already requiring these services and others about to reach a maturity level at which they will require them in the near future. The project conducted a Timing Service User Needs Analysis to identify the timing needs of end-users in market sectors as diverse as agriculture, energy, finance, media, science, surveying, telecommunications and transport.

      This analysis concluded that the finance, energy and telecommunications markets have the greatest short-term commercial potential for the delivery of timing services. Synchronisation monitoring, accuracy, certification and availability were found to be the key areas where timing services are required in these three markets.

      Each market is already served by existing solutions, but these mainly concentrate on the delivery of accurate time and focus less on monitoring, certification of time sources and availability of time. To ensure that the needs of the market are met, specific business plans will be rolled out for each DEMETRA service. These will vary considerably based on the maturity of the service and the applicability of the service to each market.

      For more information, click here.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      Services tested by DEMETRA could foster the dissemination of EGNSS-based common standardised time services throughout Europe

      Time is of the essence

      5.10.2017 10:23  
      Published: 
      05 October 2017

      To identify timing service needs that are not yet being met by the EGNSS basic time service, the ‘DEMonstrator of EGNSS services based on Time Reference Architecture’ (DEMETRA) project developed a prototype of an EGNSS-based time disseminator that provides time certification, redundancy, resilience, integrity, and improved accuracy, while validating the concept of ‘time as a service’.

      The overarching goal of the DEMETRA project was to promote the use of EGNSS (EGNOS and Galileo) by enhancing and augmenting its timing service characteristics. To ensure that the needs of timing and synchronisation users were incorporated into the project design, the developers engaged with these end-users to design a system to demonstrate new or advanced timing services based on a common infrastructure that is scalable, robust, and continuously monitored.

      Nine different time services were developed and integrated in the demonstrator, with varying degrees of technical and commercial maturity, based on the European GNSS basic timing service, which was complemented by other independent time transfer technologies. The services tested were:

      1. Time Broadcasting over TV/Radio Links;
      2. Certified Trusted Time Distribution using the Network Time Protocol (NTP);
      3. Time & Frequency Distribution over Optical Link;
      4. Time & Frequency Distribution via GEO Satellite;
      5. User GNSS Receiver Calibration;
      6. Certified Time Steering;
      7. Time Monitoring and Steering;
      8. Time Integrity; and an
      9. All-in-one Time Synchronisation Solution.

      These services could become the basis for European timing standards, making timing of critical European infrastructure independent from GPS and fostering the dissemination of EGNSS-based common standardised time services throughout Europe.

      Watch this: DEMETRA: Time as a Service

      Main features

      The project demonstrated the feasibility of delivering early EGNSS timing services to end users by utilising an operational prototype of a Galileo Time Services Provider (TSP) which could provide timing products to the Galileo system while also providing additional time services to other external customers.

      The demonstrator was built around the concept of a common core infrastructure hosting advanced time services and delivering common services. These include time services monitoring, reference time, managing a centralised TSP database, and offering public and private web services such as the provision of TSP information for the general public and usage data and KPI for subscribed users. The demonstrator was deployed as an open and scalable architecture with common interfaces, making it easier to integrate new time services in the future.

      This allows service developers to focus on performance at user level.

      Galileo Time Services Provider

      An eye on the market

      There is significant untapped potential on the market for timing services, with some users already requiring these services and others about to reach a maturity level at which they will require them in the near future. The project conducted a Timing Service User Needs Analysis to identify the timing needs of end-users in market sectors as diverse as agriculture, energy, finance, media, science, surveying, telecommunications and transport.

      This analysis concluded that the finance, energy and telecommunications markets have the greatest short-term commercial potential for the delivery of timing services. Synchronisation monitoring, accuracy, certification and availability were found to be the key areas where timing services are required in these three markets.

      Each market is already served by existing solutions, but these mainly concentrate on the delivery of accurate time and focus less on monitoring, certification of time sources and availability of time. To ensure that the needs of the market are met, specific business plans will be rolled out for each DEMETRA service. These will vary considerably based on the maturity of the service and the applicability of the service to each market.

      For more information, click here.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      Services tested by DEMETRA could foster the dissemination of EGNSS-based common standardised time services throughout Europe

      Time is of the essence

      5.10.2017 10:23  
      Published: 
      05 October 2017

      To identify timing service needs that are not yet being met by the EGNSS basic time service, the ‘DEMonstrator of EGNSS services based on Time Reference Architecture’ (DEMETRA) project developed a prototype of an EGNSS-based time disseminator that provides time certification, redundancy, resilience, integrity, and improved accuracy, while validating the concept of ‘time as a service’.

      The overarching goal of the DEMETRA project was to promote the use of EGNSS (EGNOS and Galileo) by enhancing and augmenting its timing service characteristics. To ensure that the needs of timing and synchronisation users were incorporated into the project design, the developers engaged with these end-users to design a system to demonstrate new or advanced timing services based on a common infrastructure that is scalable, robust, and continuously monitored.

      Nine different time services were developed and integrated in the demonstrator, with varying degrees of technical and commercial maturity, based on the European GNSS basic timing service, which was complemented by other independent time transfer technologies. The services tested were:

      1. Time Broadcasting over TV/Radio Links;
      2. Certified Trusted Time Distribution using the Network Time Protocol (NTP);
      3. Time & Frequency Distribution over Optical Link;
      4. Time & Frequency Distribution via GEO Satellite;
      5. User GNSS Receiver Calibration;
      6. Certified Time Steering;
      7. Time Monitoring and Steering;
      8. Time Integrity; and an
      9. All-in-one Time Synchronisation Solution.

      These services could become the basis for European timing standards, making timing of critical European infrastructure independent from GPS and fostering the dissemination of EGNSS-based common standardised time services throughout Europe.

      Watch this: DEMETRA: Time as a Service

      Main features

      The project demonstrated the feasibility of delivering early EGNSS timing services to end users by utilising an operational prototype of a Galileo Time Services Provider (TSP) which could provide timing products to the Galileo system while also providing additional time services to other external customers.

      The demonstrator was built around the concept of a common core infrastructure hosting advanced time services and delivering common services. These include time services monitoring, reference time, managing a centralised TSP database, and offering public and private web services such as the provision of TSP information for the general public and usage data and KPI for subscribed users. The demonstrator was deployed as an open and scalable architecture with common interfaces, making it easier to integrate new time services in the future.

      This allows service developers to focus on performance at user level.

      Galileo Time Services Provider

      An eye on the market

      There is significant untapped potential on the market for timing services, with some users already requiring these services and others about to reach a maturity level at which they will require them in the near future. The project conducted a Timing Service User Needs Analysis to identify the timing needs of end-users in market sectors as diverse as agriculture, energy, finance, media, science, surveying, telecommunications and transport.

      This analysis concluded that the finance, energy and telecommunications markets have the greatest short-term commercial potential for the delivery of timing services. Synchronisation monitoring, accuracy, certification and availability were found to be the key areas where timing services are required in these three markets.

      Each market is already served by existing solutions, but these mainly concentrate on the delivery of accurate time and focus less on monitoring, certification of time sources and availability of time. To ensure that the needs of the market are met, specific business plans will be rolled out for each DEMETRA service. These will vary considerably based on the maturity of the service and the applicability of the service to each market.

      For more information, click here.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      Services tested by DEMETRA could foster the dissemination of EGNSS-based common standardised time services throughout Europe

      Time is of the essence

      5.10.2017 10:23  
      Published: 
      05 October 2017

      To identify timing service needs that are not yet being met by the EGNSS basic time service, the ‘DEMonstrator of EGNSS services based on Time Reference Architecture’ (DEMETRA) project developed a prototype of an EGNSS-based time disseminator that provides time certification, redundancy, resilience, integrity, and improved accuracy, while validating the concept of ‘time as a service’.

      The overarching goal of the DEMETRA project was to promote the use of EGNSS (EGNOS and Galileo) by enhancing and augmenting its timing service characteristics. To ensure that the needs of timing and synchronisation users were incorporated into the project design, the developers engaged with these end-users to design a system to demonstrate new or advanced timing services based on a common infrastructure that is scalable, robust, and continuously monitored.

      Nine different time services were developed and integrated in the demonstrator, with varying degrees of technical and commercial maturity, based on the European GNSS basic timing service, which was complemented by other independent time transfer technologies. The services tested were:

      1. Time Broadcasting over TV/Radio Links;
      2. Certified Trusted Time Distribution using the Network Time Protocol (NTP);
      3. Time & Frequency Distribution over Optical Link;
      4. Time & Frequency Distribution via GEO Satellite;
      5. User GNSS Receiver Calibration;
      6. Certified Time Steering;
      7. Time Monitoring and Steering;
      8. Time Integrity; and an
      9. All-in-one Time Synchronisation Solution.

      These services could become the basis for European timing standards, making timing of critical European infrastructure independent from GPS and fostering the dissemination of EGNSS-based common standardised time services throughout Europe.

      Watch this: DEMETRA: Time as a Service

      Main features

      The project demonstrated the feasibility of delivering early EGNSS timing services to end users by utilising an operational prototype of a Galileo Time Services Provider (TSP) which could provide timing products to the Galileo system while also providing additional time services to other external customers.

      The demonstrator was built around the concept of a common core infrastructure hosting advanced time services and delivering common services. These include time services monitoring, reference time, managing a centralised TSP database, and offering public and private web services such as the provision of TSP information for the general public and usage data and KPI for subscribed users. The demonstrator was deployed as an open and scalable architecture with common interfaces, making it easier to integrate new time services in the future.

      This allows service developers to focus on performance at user level.

      Galileo Time Services Provider

      An eye on the market

      There is significant untapped potential on the market for timing services, with some users already requiring these services and others about to reach a maturity level at which they will require them in the near future. The project conducted a Timing Service User Needs Analysis to identify the timing needs of end-users in market sectors as diverse as agriculture, energy, finance, media, science, surveying, telecommunications and transport.

      This analysis concluded that the finance, energy and telecommunications markets have the greatest short-term commercial potential for the delivery of timing services. Synchronisation monitoring, accuracy, certification and availability were found to be the key areas where timing services are required in these three markets.

      Each market is already served by existing solutions, but these mainly concentrate on the delivery of accurate time and focus less on monitoring, certification of time sources and availability of time. To ensure that the needs of the market are met, specific business plans will be rolled out for each DEMETRA service. These will vary considerably based on the maturity of the service and the applicability of the service to each market.

      For more information, click here.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      Services tested by DEMETRA could foster the dissemination of EGNSS-based common standardised time services throughout Europe

      Are you an EGNOS user? We want to hear from you!

      3.10.2017 14:13  
      The GSA uses feedback from users to improve EGNOS service delivery.
      Published: 
      03 October 2017

      With the 2017 EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) aims to gain a clearer picture of the requirements of EGNOS users so it can improve EGNOS service delivery.

      The GSA, along with the European Satellite Services Provider (ESSP), has launched the 2017 edition of its EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey. In conducting this survey, the GSA and ESSP aim to gain a better understanding of EGNOS’ value to users, with a view to providing better customer service.

      The survey will be open to EGNOS users until November 30 and only takes a few moments to complete.

      You can access the survey here.

      The survey covers all market segments and services, including the Open Service, the Safety of Life Service and the EGNOS Data Access Service (EDAS). It also assesses the ESSP’s management of EGNOS User Support Services. All EGNOS users are strongly encouraged to participate, regardless of the market segment in which they operate.

      The 2016 EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey showed a positive trend, with user satisfaction increased substantially compared with 2015. These results will be presented in full at the EGNOS Workshop, which is to be held in Athens, Greece, on 3-4 October, 2017.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      The GSA uses feedback from users to improve EGNOS service delivery.

      Are you an EGNOS user? We want to hear from you!

      3.10.2017 14:13  
      Published: 
      03 October 2017

      With the 2017 EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) aims to gain a clearer picture of the requirements of EGNOS users so it can improve EGNOS service delivery.

      The GSA, along with the European Satellite Services Provider (ESSP), has launched the 2017 edition of its EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey. In conducting this survey, the GSA and ESSP aim to gain a better understanding of EGNOS’ value to users, with a view to providing better customer service.

      The survey will be open to EGNOS users until December 1 and only takes a few moments to complete.

      You can access the survey here.

      The survey covers all market segments and services, including the Open Service, the Safety of Life Service and the EGNOS Data Access Service (EDAS). It also assesses the ESSP’s management of EGNOS User Support Services. All EGNOS users are strongly encouraged to participate, regardless of the market segment in which they operate.

      The 2016 EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey showed a positive trend, with user satisfaction increased substantially compared with 2015. These results will be presented in full at the EGNOS Workshop, which is to be held in Athens, Greece, on 3-4 October, 2017.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      The GSA uses feedback from users to improve EGNOS service delivery.

      Are you an EGNOS user? We want to hear from you!

      3.10.2017 14:13  
      Published: 
      03 October 2017

      With the 2017 EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) aims to gain a clearer picture of the requirements of EGNOS users so it can improve EGNOS service delivery.

      The GSA, along with the European Satellite Services Provider (ESSP), has launched the 2017 edition of its EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey. In conducting this survey, the GSA and ESSP aim to gain a better understanding of EGNOS’ value to users, with a view to providing better customer service.

      The survey will be open to EGNOS users until November 30 and only takes a few moments to complete.

      You can access the survey here.

      The survey covers all market segments and services, including the Open Service, the Safety of Life Service and the EGNOS Data Access Service (EDAS). It also assesses the ESSP’s management of EGNOS User Support Services. All EGNOS users are strongly encouraged to participate, regardless of the market segment in which they operate.

      The 2016 EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey showed a positive trend, with user satisfaction increased substantially compared with 2015. These results will be presented in full at the EGNOS Workshop, which is to be held in Athens, Greece, on 3-4 October, 2017.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      The GSA uses feedback from users to improve EGNOS service delivery.

      Are you an EGNOS user? We want to hear from you!

      3.10.2017 14:13  
      Published: 
      03 October 2017

      With the 2017 EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) aims to gain a clearer picture of the requirements of EGNOS users so it can improve EGNOS service delivery.

      The GSA, along with the European Satellite Services Provider (ESSP), has launched the 2017 edition of its EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey. In conducting this survey, the GSA and ESSP aim to gain a better understanding of EGNOS’ value to users, with a view to providing better customer service.

      The survey will be open to EGNOS users until December 1 and only takes a few moments to complete.

      You can access the survey here.

      The survey covers all market segments and services, including the Open Service, the Safety of Life Service and the EGNOS Data Access Service (EDAS). It also assesses the ESSP’s management of EGNOS User Support Services. All EGNOS users are strongly encouraged to participate, regardless of the market segment in which they operate.

      The 2016 EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey showed a positive trend, with user satisfaction increased substantially compared with 2015. These results will be presented in full at the EGNOS Workshop, which is to be held in Athens, Greece, on 3-4 October, 2017.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      The GSA uses feedback from users to improve EGNOS service delivery.

      Are you an EGNOS user? We want to hear from you!

      3.10.2017 14:13  
      Published: 
      03 October 2017

      With the 2017 EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) aims to gain a clearer picture of the requirements of EGNOS users so it can improve EGNOS service delivery.

      The GSA, along with the European Satellite Services Provider (ESSP), has launched the 2017 edition of its EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey. In conducting this survey, the GSA and ESSP aim to gain a better understanding of EGNOS’ value to users, with a view to providing better customer service.

      The survey will be open to EGNOS users until December 1 and only takes a few moments to complete.

      You can access the survey here.

      The survey covers all market segments and services, including the Open Service, the Safety of Life Service and the EGNOS Data Access Service (EDAS). It also assesses the ESSP’s management of EGNOS User Support Services. All EGNOS users are strongly encouraged to participate, regardless of the market segment in which they operate.

      The 2016 EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey showed a positive trend, with user satisfaction increased substantially compared with 2015. These results will be presented in full at the EGNOS Workshop, which is to be held in Athens, Greece, on 3-4 October, 2017.

      Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

      The GSA uses feedback from users to improve EGNOS service delivery.
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