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GSA talks EGNOS with Geospatial World Magazine

29.11.2017 9:51  
Published: 
29 November 2017

In a recent article published by Geospatial World, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) discusses how the EGNOS Open Service and the EGNOS Data Access Service (EDAS) help provide users with improved location performance.

Location plays an important role in many of our day-to-day activities. “Every day we need to locate various points, such as places, businesses, customers and resources,” says GSA Market Development Officer and article author Reinhard Blasi. “Maps are the means we use to place these points into a geographic context, and to create maps, these points need to be positioned.”

In Europe, the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service (EGNOS) helps locate these points with sub-meter accuracy in an easy, affordable and flexible way and in real time. It can also boost the data capture, which is usually the most time-consuming process in the development of a mapping or GIS application.

EGNOS was designed to improve GPS performance in Europe. “The EGNOS Open Service provides this improved performance to users of general-purpose applications,” says Blasi. “It is freely accessible through a GPS/SBAS compatible receiver within the area of coverage, and no specific authorisation is required.”

The EGNOS Data Access Service (EDAS), on the other hand, is EGNOS’ internet-based service. It provides free-of-charge access to all the data generated and collected by the EGNOS infrastructure. EDAS gathers all the raw data coming from the GPS, GLONASS and EGNOS GEO satellites collected by all the receivers located at the EGNOS stations, which are mainly distributed over Europe and North Africa. Once the data is received, EDAS disseminates it over the internet in real time and through an FTP archive, resulting in the different services, depending on the protocol and format used and the type of information available to users.

“With EDAS, users equipped with compatible software applications and/or GNSS receivers and having access to the internet can obtain improved accuracy with respect to GPS standalone by implementing advanced positioning techniques,” says Blasi in the article.

This is an excerpt from the 1 September 2017 article entitled European SBAS: EGNOS offers free sub-metre accuracy in Europe published by Geospatial World. You can read the full article here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

This figure shows the typical accuracy one can achieve with EGNOS.

Galileo-enabled RTK network brings clear benefits to surveyors

27.11.2017 8:36  
Published: 
27 November 2017

Now that surveyors worldwide are able to use Galileo positioning, following the declaration of Galileo Initial Services, all major Precise Point Positioning (PPP) providers in Europe have upgraded to Galileo and more than 50% of real time kinematic (RTK) network providers have already upgraded or have started to upgrade.

At the latest Council of European Geodetic Surveyors (CLGE) General Assembly, which was held in Potsdam in Germany on 29 September 2017, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) organised the second edition of the workshop “Integrating Galileo in RTK networks: success stories and open challenges”, at which industry representatives shared their experience and results received from Galileo performance testing.

At the event, Roberto Capua from Italian public augmentation service provider Sogei and Paul Chambon from French private RTK service provider Terria spoke about the technicalities, challenges and benefits of Galileo inclusion into RTK networks. The two service providers noted in particular that field tests had shown the benefits of Galileo inclusion into the RTK networks.

“The results confirm the usability of the Galileo constellation in high-precision RTK applications and show improved availability, reliability, accuracy and time-to-fix in difficult measuring environments such as urban canyons and under tree canopies,” they said.

New markets, new chipsets

Both service providers highlighted that there are new emerging markets for high precision services, especially in the mass market domain. One such promising sector is autonomous driving, which is slowly becoming a reality due to enhanced positioning systems and the evolution of augmentation services (RTK, PPP, PPP/RTK, etc.).

Capua also underlined the availability of new dual-frequency mass market chipsets using L1/L5 frequencies, which will allow increased positioning accuracy with mass market devices such as smartphones, tablets, wearables. “With E5/L5 capability added to the E1/L1, chipsets and receivers benefit from better accuracy, ionosphere error cancellation, improved code tracking pseudorange estimates, and faster transition from code tracking to phase tracking, among other benefits,” he said.

GSA questionnaire

During the workshop, the GSA also launched a real-time questionnaire that aimed to gain a better understanding of Galileo’s value to end-users, the needs of surveyors and reference network providers, the level of Galileo adoption and challenges users may face when upgrading to Galileo.

The survey showed that end-users have a good understanding of Galileo’s added value, with 69% of the respondents declaring that are convinced that Galileo will improve their work. On the other hand, the survey confirmed there is still an issue with inter-operability between the different brands of RX manufacturers within the RTK-network and that the inclusion of Galileo into the RTK network is expensive.

1st Galileo User Assembly

Information received from the Galileo questionnaire will feed into the discussion at the 1st Galileo User Assembly, which is set to take place next week (28-29 November). Hosted by the GSC at its premises in Madrid, the Assembly will give Galileo users the opportunity to discuss their needs, share their experience, and provide feedback on Galileo performance.

The Assembly will include:

  • A Galileo User Consultation Platform (UCP) in 4 thematic groups (transport, mass market, professional and R&D);
  • A general update on the Galileo programme;
  • Presentations on Galileo Initial Services performance, the Galileo Services Roadmap and the Galileo User Interfaces; and
  • A Galileo User Satisfaction Survey.

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

All major PPP providers and most RTK providers in Europe have already upgraded or have started to upgrade to Galileo

Galileo-enabled RTK network brings clear benefits to surveyors

27.11.2017 8:36  
Published: 
27 November 2017

Now that surveyors worldwide are able to use Galileo positioning, following the declaration of Galileo Initial Services, all major Precise Point Positioning (PPP) providers in Europe have upgraded to Galileo and more than 50% of real time kinematic (RTK) network providers have already upgraded or have started to upgrade.

At the latest Council of European Geodetic Surveyors (CLGE) General Assembly, which was held in Potsdam in Germany on 29 September 2017, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) organised the second edition of the workshop “Integrating Galileo in RTK networks: success stories and open challenges”, at which industry representatives shared their experience and results received from Galileo performance testing.

At the event, Roberto Capua from Italian public augmentation service provider Sogei and Paul Chambon from French private RTK service provider Terria spoke about the technicalities, challenges and benefits of Galileo inclusion into RTK networks. The two service providers noted in particular that field tests had shown the benefits of Galileo inclusion into the RTK networks.

“The results confirm the usability of the Galileo constellation in high-precision RTK applications and show improved availability, reliability, accuracy and time-to-fix in difficult measuring environments such as urban canyons and under tree canopies,” they said.

New markets, new chipsets

Both service providers highlighted that there are new emerging markets for high precision services, especially in the mass market domain. One such promising sector is autonomous driving, which is slowly becoming a reality due to enhanced positioning systems and the evolution of augmentation services (RTK, PPP, PPP/RTK, etc.).

Capua also underlined the availability of new dual-frequency mass market chipsets using L1/L5 frequencies, which will allow increased positioning accuracy with mass market devices such as smartphones, tablets, wearables. “With E5/L5 capability added to the E1/L1, chipsets and receivers benefit from better accuracy, ionosphere error cancellation, improved code tracking pseudorange estimates, and faster transition from code tracking to phase tracking, among other benefits,” he said.

GSA questionnaire

During the workshop, the GSA also launched a real-time questionnaire that aimed to gain a better understanding of Galileo’s value to end-users, the needs of surveyors and reference network providers, the level of Galileo adoption and challenges users may face when upgrading to Galileo.

The survey showed that end-users have a good understanding of Galileo’s added value, with 69% of the respondents declaring that are convinced that Galileo will improve their work. On the other hand, the survey confirmed there is still an issue with inter-operability between the different brands of RX manufacturers within the RTK-network and that the inclusion of Galileo into the RTK network is expensive.

1st Galileo User Assembly

Information received from the Galileo questionnaire will feed into the discussion at the 1st Galileo User Assembly, which is set to take place next week (28-29 November). Hosted by the GSC at its premises in Madrid, the Assembly will give Galileo users the opportunity to discuss their needs, share their experience, and provide feedback on Galileo performance.

The Assembly will include:

  • A Galileo User Consultation Platform (UCP) in 4 thematic groups (transport, mass market, professional and R&D);
  • A general update on the Galileo programme;
  • Presentations on Galileo Initial Services performance, the Galileo Services Roadmap and the Galileo User Interfaces; and
  • A Galileo User Satisfaction Survey.

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

All major PPP providers and most RTK providers in Europe have already upgraded or have started to upgrade to Galileo

JOHAN Sports set to go global

23.11.2017 11:03  
Published: 
23 November 2017

Last time we checked in with the JOHAN project, the team was finalising the final testing phase. Just a couple years later, they’re on the verge of going global.

Winner of the GSA Special Prize at the 2013 European Satellite Navigation Competition (ESNC), JOHAN Sports develops motion sensors for location determination and performance measurement of team athletes, especially football and hockey players.

“JOHAN Sports provides data-driven insights and advice to teams, trainers and players to improve performance and prevent injuries,” explains founder Robin van Kappel. “With JOHAN, you can see who is training too hard and who has a higher chance of injury, as well as who is strong in which performance aspects, such as endurance, sprint, agility and recovery.”

The wearable motion sensors are integrated with heart rate and recovery forms and an online platform based on data science, sports science and customer needs. The GNSS tracker – which is Galileo capable – can determine positioning up to 1.5 metres of a player’s location. By combining this data with measurements from inertial sensors, accuracy becomes even higher.

After each use, players and coaches can monitor workload, performance, tactical information and event analysis, allowing players to spot weaknesses and improve their game over time. Coaches can also use the analysis to better capitalise on certain players’ strengths to the team’s advantage. “The measured data is visualised online via a personalised analysis environment for coaches and players that is backed by live support,” adds van Kappel.

According to van Kappel, JOHAN stands apart from the competition in that it offers a user-friendly and affordable performance analysis system for mid-market sports teams. “Targeting professional and semi-professional teams with relatively small and non-specialised staff, our solution is easy to use and every level of trainer can understand it – which differentiates us from the competition,” he says. “By continuously investing in the research and development of the online platform, we are able to offer state-of-the-art but practical products.”

Growth mode

Since final testing was completed in 2015, the project has been busy. Its team has grown from two to 12. The GSA prize provided finance for JOHAN incubation at any incubation centre, and the project decided to cooperate with the European Space Agency’s (ESA) Business Innovation Centre in Noordwijk. Working from this centre, the company has been ramping up development, adding customers and raising funds. For example, in April 2016 they raised EUR 150,000 in investment to start production work towards the product’s official commercial launch in the Netherlands. In May of this year, the company secured an additional EUR 650,000 in capital, which has been earmarked for scaling up sales, expanding the organisation and launching new hardware.

According to van Kappel, the sports market is growing rapidly (see table, below), making the potential market for JOHAN huge and largely untapped. “Sports are becoming more scientific, meaning that more scientific staff are involved and the approach and methodologies are becoming increasingly based on validated sports science,” he says. “Furthermore, broadcasting media are becoming more stats-based, which requires more and more technologies like JOHAN that can monitor players.” 

  Current Value CAGR Value in 2020
Sports Wearable Tech1  $3.8bln  20% (even 40% for the European market)  $6bln
 Sports Analytics2  $350mln  68%  $4.7bln

With team solutions starting from EUR 400 per month, today JOHAN is already used by 30 sports teams, including PEC Zwolle (Eredivisie), NEC (First division), Feyenoord Academy, SD Feirense (Primeira Liga Portugal) and the Royal Dutch Hockey Association. However, in order to grow, the company knows it must look further afield, both to the European and US markets. “The US market is important to us because the value of sports there is very high, with lots of colleges, universities and professional sport clubs having high revenues and budgets,” says van Kappel.

To serve this market, JOHAN’s current products are completely English based, scalable, ready for rapid growth and are usable by everybody on the team – including trainers, players, staff and even directors. “This technology is now easily adoptable by ambitious teams searching for a competitive edge,” adds van Kappel. “As technology and sports are very much embraced in the US, it is a very attractive market for JOHAN.”

To continue to capitalise on these market opportunities, this year JOHAN is launching its next generation system, which will feature real-time analysis, almost full autonomy and automatic data analysis provided by machine learning technology. Players and trainers can use dedicated mobile apps for continuous interaction with the system, both on the field, between training and matches and at home. Furthermore, the system’s compatibility with third party products makes integration with video, heart rate monitoring and tactical tools even richer.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

JOHAN’s GNSS trackers – which are Galileo capable – can determine positioning up to 1.5 metres of a player’s location.

Taking stock of Commercial Space Applications, between Transformation, Fusion and Competition

22.11.2017 11:08  
Published: 
22 November 2017

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) recently sponsored the 23rd Ka and Broadband Communications Conference and the 35th AIAA International Communications Satellite Systems Conference (ICSSC), two of the most influential technical conferences on satellite systems, which were held jointly in Trieste, Italy, on 16-19 October 2017.

Under the theme Commercial Space Applications: Transformation, Fusion and Competition, participants examined the competitive market transformations arising from the development of new low Earth orbit (LEO) systems and small satellites, in addition to stratospheric platforms and geostationary (GEO) systems, among other technological developments.

This rapid technological revolution and the resulting large scale integration of services are driving a major transformation in satellite systems. The attendees examined these developments, discussed new uses of the technologies, and explored the economic, marketing, technical and regulatory issues that need to be addressed for the technological developments to reach their full potential.

Technological advances to change how people live

At the conference, GSA Head of Market Development Gian-Gherardo Calini participated in a panel discussion on New Markets Emerging from Aviation and Autonomy, in which the participants discussed how new uses of airspace coupled with recent advances in autonomy will change how people live and work. It was noted, moreover, that the enormous amount of research taking place in autonomy, and its use in self-driving cars and drone operations, would result in exciting new opportunities for satellite technology.

Calini also chaired a thematic session on Navigation Systems and Applications, which he closed by pointing out the economic, marketing, technical and regulatory challenges that need to be overcome.

Next year’s joint conference - the 24th Ka and Broadband Communications Conference and the 36th AIAA International Communications Satellite Systems Conference - will be held in Niagara Falls, Canada, on 15-18 October 2018.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Participants in the conference examined the market potential of new satellite technology developments

Uniting space technologies, developers and ideas

21.11.2017 11:53  
Published: 
21 November 2017

The SpaceTech2017 Hackathon, part of Estonian Space Week, challenged hardware and software developers to utilise the synergies between Galileo and Copernicus to create innovative applications.

Although Galileo and Copernicus serve different functions – with Galileo being a GNSS system and Copernicus an Earth Observation system – there are a number of important synergies between the two. The challenge, however, is developing innovative applications that make full use of these synergies – which was the exact challenge presented to the teams competing at the SpaceTech2017 Hackathon in Tartu, Estonia.

“The idea behind the Hackathon is to bring together software and hardware developers and provide them the opportunity to combine the unprecedented volume of data made available by Galileo and Copernicus,” says Paul Liias, Expert in Space Technologies at the Economic Development Department of Estonia’s Ministry of Economic Affairs and Communications, who hosted the event as part of European Space Week.

Organised by Estonian event planning company Garage48 and with the support of the GSA and the European Space Agency (ESA), the hackathon brought together 122 developers, engineers, data scientists, designers and marketers from 23 different countries – including India, the Middle East, Europe and the US. The ESA provided participants with an API containing access to Copernicus data, while the GSA provided Galileo-enabled hardware featuring GNSS raw measurements, and access to a set of location APIs through Here Technologies - its partner for the event.

“We were happy to be able to bring together the GSA and ESA – two of the biggest players in space technology – to one hackathon,” says Garage48’s Kai Isand. “As a result, participants not only had access to Galileo and Copernicus data, but also top-notch mentors from each organisation who supported the teams during the event.”

Winning ideas

Each team was challenged to come up with exciting ideas using different elements from different streams to create integrated solutions – all within just 48 hours. Applications were judged based on their level of innovation and creativity, use of space technology and data, level of teamwork, business potential and vision for the future.

The winner of the GSA prize, which was awarded to Location Based Services (LBS) and Geo-IoT applications, was the Run Me If You Can game. The fun social fitness app lets runners interact and compete in real time with other runners from around the world. Matched runners race equal distances, crossing geo-placed checkpoints, and the first one back is declared the winner.

“The Hackathon was a great opportunity to learn more about the huge amount of data made available to developers through Copernicus and the incredible accuracy of Galileo positioning,” says Run Me If You Can team leader Francesco Renzi. “I think the ideas created at this event are just the tip of the iceberg, and that there are lots of yet-to-be-thought of real-world applications that will soon benefit from these European space technologies.” 

The overall winning idea came from the iDoBalloon team, who built an educational DIY High Altitude Balloon Kit. The balloon, which can be sent to the stratosphere, will provide science students with a unique point of view and a one-of-a-kind learning opportunity. “The whole process was a big challenge for our team – one filled with a lot of emotions and very little sleep,” says iDoBalloon team leader. “But thanks in large part to the on-site mentors and the support we received from the event organisers, we were able to reach our goal by the end of the hackathon.”

Taking home the prize for best GNSS/Copernicus integration was TeamONGrid and their application for tracking military endurance competitions using Military Grid Reference System (MGRS) maps. The app lets teams easily share location data with their support detail, designate upcoming team service points, and use digital breadcrumbs to simplify navigation on paper-based MGRS maps. TeamONGrid was also the overall runner up and the runner up on the GSA Prize.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The SpaceTech2017 Integrated Applications Hackathon brought together 122 developers, engineers, data scientists, designers and marketers from 23 different.

GSA management systems better than ever

20.11.2017 11:20  
Published: 
20 November 2017

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) has successfully qualified its ISO 9001: 2015-compliant management system as part of this year's re-certification audit. The audit revealed that quality management processes at the agency have improved as a result of being adapted and developed since the previous audit.

In this year’s recertification audit, the Lloyds Register (LRQA) auditors paid particular attention to the effectiveness of the GSA quality management system, and found that there were no deviations from the requirements of the standard.

Commenting on the audit results, GSA Executive Director Carlo Des Dorides said that ISO certification, complemented by ECSS (European Cooperation for Space Standardisation) and ITIL best practices for IT service management,   was not only important proof of the agency’s services, processes and customer orientation, but also evidence that the GSA is ready to implement operations in a sustainable manner. “In this respect, we are very happy about the confirmation of the certificate, also against the background of GSA now being the Galileo service provider," he said.

Appreciation of new tools and processes

During the re-certification, the GSA performed well and fulfilled all the criteria. As a special strength, it was emphasised that that GSA had been able to further improve its definition of operational processes. The audit also found that the GSA implements risk management at best practice levels and has developed an agency-wide work breakdown structure.

"The successful ISO 9001 re-certification is good news for GSA, as we have worked hard in the past few months to adapt our quality management to the role of being a service operator," said Patrick Hamilton, Head of the Project Control Department. "The fact that the audit has confirmed this so positively confirms our efforts and is also an incentive to continually evaluate and optimise our services and processes."

About ISO 9001

The International Standards Organisation (ISO) is a worldwide federation of national standards bodies (ISO member bodies). The work of preparing International Standards is carried out through ISO technical committees, in liaison with international organisations, governmental and non-governmental bodies.

The ISO 9001 certification is the most widely used and most important standard in quality management at national and international level. It sets standards that ensure transparency of operational procedures and increase customer satisfaction, as well as ensuring optimal operational structures. After a re-certification, the certification is valid for three years, but is checked annually in the context of so-called monitoring audits.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The ISO 9001 audit found that adapting and further developing existing processes has improved the GSA quality management system.

GSA management systems better than ever

20.11.2017 11:20  
The ISO 9001 audit found that adapting and further developing existing processes has improved the GSA quality management system.
Published: 
20 November 2017

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) has successfully qualified its ISO 9001: 2015-compliant management system as part of this year's re-certification audit. The audit revealed that quality management processes at the agency have improved as a result of being adapted and developed since the previous audit.

In this year’s recertification audit, the Lloyds Register (LRQA) auditors paid particular attention to the effectiveness of the GSA quality management system, and found that there were no deviations from the requirements of the standard.

Commenting on the audit results, GSA Executive Director Carlo Des Dorides said that ISO certification, complemented by ECSS (European Cooperation for Space Standardisation) and ITIL best practices for IT service management,   was not only important proof of the agency’s services, processes and customer orientation, but also evidence that the GSA is ready to implement operations in a sustainable manner. “In this respect, we are very happy about the confirmation of the certificate, also against the background of GSA now being the Galileo service provider," he said.

Appreciation of new tools and processes

During the re-certification, the GSA performed well and fulfilled all the criteria. As a special strength, it was emphasised that that GSA had been able to further improve its definition of operational processes. The audit also found that the GSA implements risk management at best practice levels and has developed an agency-wide work breakdown structure.

"The successful ISO 9001 re-certification is good news for GSA, as we have worked hard in the past few months to adapt our quality management to the role of being a service operator," said Patrick Hamilton, Head of the Project Control Department. "The fact that the audit has confirmed this so positively confirms our efforts and is also an incentive to continually evaluate and optimise our services and processes."

About ISO 9001

The International Standards Organisation (ISO) is a worldwide federation of national standards bodies (ISO member bodies). The work of preparing International Standards is carried out through ISO technical committees, in liaison with international organisations, governmental and non-governmental bodies.

The ISO 9001 certification is the most widely used and most important standard in quality management at national and international level. It sets standards that ensure transparency of operational procedures and increase customer satisfaction, as well as ensuring optimal operational structures. After a re-certification, the certification is valid for three years, but is checked annually in the context of so-called monitoring audits.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The ISO 9001 audit found that adapting and further developing existing processes has improved the GSA quality management system.

GSA management systems better than ever

20.11.2017 11:20  
Published: 
20 November 2017

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) has successfully qualified its ISO 9001: 2015-compliant management system as part of this year's re-certification audit. The audit revealed that quality management processes at the agency have improved as a result of being adapted and developed since the previous audit.

In this year’s recertification audit, the Lloyds Register (LRQA) auditors paid particular attention to the effectiveness of the GSA quality management system, and found that there were no deviations from the requirements of the standard.

Commenting on the audit results, GSA Executive Director Carlo Des Dorides said that ISO certification, complemented by ECSS (European Cooperation for Space Standardisation) and ITIL best practices for IT service management,   was not only important proof of the agency’s services, processes and customer orientation, but also evidence that the GSA is ready to implement operations in a sustainable manner. “In this respect, we are very happy about the confirmation of the certificate, also against the background of GSA now being the Galileo service provider," he said.

Appreciation of new tools and processes

During the re-certification, the GSA performed well and fulfilled all the criteria. As a special strength, it was emphasised that that GSA had been able to further improve its definition of operational processes. The audit also found that the GSA implements risk management at best practice levels and has developed an agency-wide work breakdown structure.

"The successful ISO 9001 re-certification is good news for GSA, as we have worked hard in the past few months to adapt our quality management to the role of being a service operator," said Patrick Hamilton, Head of the Project Control Department. "The fact that the audit has confirmed this so positively confirms our efforts and is also an incentive to continually evaluate and optimise our services and processes."

About ISO 9001

The International Standards Organisation (ISO) is a worldwide federation of national standards bodies (ISO member bodies). The work of preparing International Standards is carried out through ISO technical committees, in liaison with international organisations, governmental and non-governmental bodies.

The ISO 9001 certification is the most widely used and most important standard in quality management at national and international level. It sets standards that ensure transparency of operational procedures and increase customer satisfaction, as well as ensuring optimal operational structures. After a re-certification, the certification is valid for three years, but is checked annually in the context of so-called monitoring audits.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The ISO 9001 audit found that adapting and further developing existing processes has improved the GSA quality management system.

Central role for robust GNSS in autonomous driving

17.11.2017 10:31  
Published: 
17 November 2017

Scientists and researchers participating at the final event of the EU-funded SaPPART COST Action ('Satellite Positioning Performance Assessment for Road Transport') discussed the potential of GNSS to deliver necessary high-integrity and high-precision positioning capabilities for autonomous road vehicles. A robust centralised on-board GNSS unit could deliver the requisite levels of performance for a variety of in-vehicle applications.

Ifsttar's François Peyret, who served as Chairman of SaPPART, opened the event organised jointly with ERTICO, laying out a core emerging premise for autonomous road transport: "These automatic driving cars will definitely need absolute positioning. They will need a kind of 'box', a GNSS technology, that will provide you with your positioning, with all the required performances. And this will then be hybridised with other kinds of sensors."

SaPPART has been described by organisers as a framework for trans-national cooperation among European researchers, engineers and scholars working in the GNSS and ITS domains, with the common goal of defining requirements for positioning integrity in the road sector. Key areas of interest have included the standardisation and certification of vehicle positioning technologies, the attainment of which is expected to accelerate the uptake of GNSS-based ITS and mobility applications.

SaPPART Science officer Pierre-Yves Gilliéron said, "Positioning is playing a key role for many road and ITS applications such as road user charging. "Our COST Action has been a fantastic tool," he added, "a framework that has been very useful in gathering together researchers and scientists. With SaPPART we have created an international network where we can share knowledge and ideas."

The real challenge, Gilliéron said, was to get the diverse GNSS and ITS communities on the same page, all speaking the same language and understanding each other’s needs. "We received funding for four years and in that time we were able to come closer together and develop a number of clear ideas for common research."

In terms of concrete deliverables, SaPPART has already issued some key reference documents, including a White Paper outlining the basics of GNSS for the ITS audience, as well as a more technically detailed SaPPART Handbook.

"We collected real data sets, carried out testing on-board vehicles, including different GNSS receivers and high-end equipment," said Gilliéron. "In addition to our other publications, the White Paper and the Handbook, a set of Guidelines is now also under preparation on how to assess the quality of positioning in different contexts and for different applications. Those Guidelines will be available by the end of this year."

One thing all seem to be in agreement about – the deployment of autonomous vehicles will soon become a reality on European road networks, and most driving-related decisions will be based, one way or another, on the location of the vehicle and of other vehicles and objects in its vicinity. So vehicle location and positioning will be a critical component for the effective transportation of people and goods by self-driving road vehicles. That positioning will be enabled mainly by GNSS technologies, including Europe’s Galileo, which is expected to offer significant benefits in terms of accuracy and authentication compared to the other satellite-based navigation systems.

View of the European GNSS Agency

"We believe that GNSS is a core technology," said GSA officer Alberto Fernández-Wyttenbach. "It will have to be complimented with other technologies in order to get to the integrity level that we need in 100% of environmental situations, but we also believe GNSS can do more than just navigation. We expect to use it in a very robust way to enable or compliment many other applications."

Fernández said the GSA sees GNSS as an 'engine' for a range of uses within a vehicle: "In commercial vehicles, for example, today there are many applications for which the use of GNSS is particularly relevant."

He also referenced the GNSS-driven smart tachograph, with its enhanced security features, which allows users to pinpoint the geographic location of the vehicle, making compliance easier for operators and facilitating targeted enforcement by authorities throughout the EU.

"We see the convergence with road tolling and fleet management systems that are designed to control the deployment of trucks," Fernández said. "Now instead of having a separate GNSS unit for each of these applications, we understand that you could have one single on-board GNSS monitoring system that could provide positioning for all of them. And you would thereby save on costs."

There are barriers, he said, including the fact that commercial GNSS equipment manufacturers are not necessarily using the best quality chipsets at this time. "That means we may need to rely on more expensive sensor technologies to give us the required precision and integrity," Fernández said. "On the other hand, if we can push for a more advanced, more precise GNSS receiver, such as a multi-constellation and multi-frequency receiver, we could save some of the money that would otherwise go to other types of sensors."

Regardless of what kind of GNSS device finds its way into autonomous vehicles, there will always be some inherent weaknesses associated with satellite-based navigation, Fernández acknowledged. GNSS signals are comparatively weak and do not penetrate buildings such as multi-story car parks or inside tunnels, and there are issues of reflectivity and satellite visibility in built-up urban areas. Other potential problems include vulnerability to intentional and unintentional signal interferences.

These potential problems can be overcome, as already suggested, by hybridization with other positioning sensors and highly accurate digital maps. These techniques, it is hoped, will ultimately provide a seamless position fixing capability while moving between outdoor and indoor environments.

"Ubiquitous positioning is a serious challenge if you want to be able to work in different environments and keep the same level of integrity," said Fernández. "But the combination of GNSS with other technologies, such as simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) and also inertial systems will allow us to overcome these problems."

And there will be more high-accuracy GNSS services, he said. "We have in front of us the Galileo Commercial Service that is going to provide, starting at the beginning, high accuracy positioning. Then, in a second phase, the CS will provide an extra authentication feature that will tell you whether the signal is actually coming from a satellite or from some other source."

Cyber security is also being addressed, he said: "The basic message is if you want to go for the use of GNSS, in a regulated way, in autonomous driving, we need to think about the cyber security aspects and the industry will demand solutions that are providing authentication of the satellite signal."

Seeking more input

In an important announcement, Fernández said the European Commission, along with the GSA, has decided to create a new European consultation platform for GNSS applications. "In the United States you have the so-called Civil GPS Service Interface Committee that basically is providing the opinion of the different communities. So in this same way we have designed the concept of the 'European GNSS User Consultation Platform', which will systematically gather opinions, not just from the transport modes but also in the professional market."

The platform, he said, will be divided into subgroups represent the mass market, the professional market and other segments, with a plenary to bring them all together. "There will of course be a panel for transport, including a section on road transport," said Fernandez.

"We need and want to know what the user's needs in the market are, in order to improve our services and develop our thinking about future evolutions. And really that’s the aim of this group, to contribute on the future of GNSS and the Galileo system."

The first meeting of the new European GNSS User Consultation Platform is set to take place on 28 November in Madrid, and the GSA says it is hoping to hear much more from, among others, the participants who worked with so much energy under the SaPPART initiative.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

SaPPART will deliver high-integrity and high-precision positioning capabilities for a variety of in-vehicle applications

Stakeholder Consultation GSA/SC/30/17 on Galileo Commercial Service High Accuracy Provision

16.11.2017 14:41  
Published: 
16 November 2017

Ongoing discussions between stakeholders of the Galileo Programme have outlined the opportunity to consider offering the High Accuracy Commercial Service (HA CS) to all interested users on a free of charge basis, with content and format of data publicly and openly available on a global scale.

This approach would increase the public benefit delivered by Galileo, contributing to its positioning in the market as the first GNSS system offering high accuracy services on a free of charge basis. At the same time, since departing from the scheme originally foreseen by Implementing Decision (EU) 2017/2243 of 8 February 2017, the possibility to provide HA CS on a free of charge and global basis needs to be carefully assessed in many respects. The results of the consultation may be used to support the change of the Implementing Decision. On this basis, preparation and conduct of a procurement procedure for Commercial Service provision may be initiated by the GSA. For the avoidance of doubt this stakeholder consultation shall not create any obligation on the GSA as to possible follow-up procurements.

All organisations, economic operators and members of the public with a personal or professional interest in Galileo Commercial Service, are invited to express their opinion, experience and expectations with the various aspects of the Galileo Commercial Service provision.

Further information on the Consultation is provided here.

Deadline for submission : 7 December 2017

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Stakeholder Consultation GSA/SC/30/17 on Galileo Commercial Service High Accuracy Provision

16.11.2017 14:41  
Published: 
16 November 2017

 

Ongoing discussions between stakeholders of the Galileo Programme have outlined the opportunity to consider offering the High Accuracy Commercial Service (HA CS) to all interested users on a free of charge basis, with content and format of data publicly and openly available on a global scale. This approach would increase the public benefit delivered by Galileo, contributing to its positioning in the market as the first GNSS system offering high accuracy services on a free of charge basis. At the same time, since departing from the scheme originally foreseen by Implementing Decision (EU) 2017/2243 of 8 February 2017, the possibility to provide HA CS on a free of charge and global basis needs to be carefully assessed in many respects. The results of the consultation may be used to support the change of the Implementing Decision. On this basis, preparation and conduct of a procurement procedure for Commercial Service provision may be initiated by the GSA. For the avoidance of doubt this stakeholder consultation shall not create any obligation on the GSA as to possible follow-up procurements.

All organisations, economic operators and members of the public with a personal or professional interest in Galileo Commercial Service, are invited to express their opinion, experience and expectations with the various aspects of the Galileo Commercial Service provision.

Further information on the Consultation is provided here.

Deadline for submission : 30 November 2017

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Stakeholder Consultation GSA/SC/30/17 on Galileo Commercial Service High Accuracy Provision

16.11.2017 14:41  
Published: 
16 November 2017

Ongoing discussions between stakeholders of the Galileo Programme have outlined the opportunity to consider offering the High Accuracy Commercial Service (HA CS) to all interested users on a free of charge basis, with content and format of data publicly and openly available on a global scale. This approach would increase the public benefit delivered by Galileo, contributing to its positioning in the market as the first GNSS system offering high accuracy services on a free of charge basis. At the same time, since departing from the scheme originally foreseen by Implementing Decision (EU) 2017/2243 of 8 February 2017, the possibility to provide HA CS on a free of charge and global basis needs to be carefully assessed in many respects. The results of the consultation may be used to support the change of the Implementing Decision. On this basis, preparation and conduct of a procurement procedure for Commercial Service provision may be initiated by the GSA. For the avoidance of doubt this stakeholder consultation shall not create any obligation on the GSA as to possible follow-up procurements.

All organisations, economic operators and members of the public with a personal or professional interest in Galileo Commercial Service, are invited to express their opinion, experience and expectations with the various aspects of the Galileo Commercial Service provision.

Further information on the Consultation is provided here.

Deadline for submission : 30 November 2017

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Stakeholder Consultation GSA/SC/30/17 on Galileo Commercial Service High Accuracy Provision

16.11.2017 14:41  
Published: 
16 November 2017

Ongoing discussions between stakeholders of the Galileo Programme have outlined the opportunity to consider offering the High Accuracy Commercial Service (HA CS) to all interested users on a free of charge basis, with content and format of data publicly and openly available on a global scale.

This approach would increase the public benefit delivered by Galileo, contributing to its positioning in the market as the first GNSS system offering high accuracy services on a free of charge basis. At the same time, since departing from the scheme originally foreseen by Implementing Decision (EU) 2017/2243 of 8 February 2017, the possibility to provide HA CS on a free of charge and global basis needs to be carefully assessed in many respects. The results of the consultation may be used to support the change of the Implementing Decision. On this basis, preparation and conduct of a procurement procedure for Commercial Service provision may be initiated by the GSA. For the avoidance of doubt this stakeholder consultation shall not create any obligation on the GSA as to possible follow-up procurements.

All organisations, economic operators and members of the public with a personal or professional interest in Galileo Commercial Service, are invited to express their opinion, experience and expectations with the various aspects of the Galileo Commercial Service provision.

Further information on the Consultation is provided here.

Deadline for submission : 30 November 2017

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Stakeholder Consultation GSA/SC/30/17 on Galileo Commercial Service High Accuracy Provision

16.11.2017 14:41  
Published: 
16 November 2017

Ongoing discussions between stakeholders of the Galileo Programme have outlined the opportunity to consider offering the High Accuracy Commercial Service (HA CS) to all interested users on a free of charge basis, with content and format of data publicly and openly available on a global scale.

This approach would increase the public benefit delivered by Galileo, contributing to its positioning in the market as the first GNSS system offering high accuracy services on a free of charge basis. At the same time, since departing from the scheme originally foreseen by Implementing Decision (EU) 2017/2243 of 8 February 2017, the possibility to provide HA CS on a free of charge and global basis needs to be carefully assessed in many respects. The results of the consultation may be used to support the change of the Implementing Decision. On this basis, preparation and conduct of a procurement procedure for Commercial Service provision may be initiated by the GSA. For the avoidance of doubt this stakeholder consultation shall not create any obligation on the GSA as to possible follow-up procurements.

All organisations, economic operators and members of the public with a personal or professional interest in Galileo Commercial Service, are invited to express their opinion, experience and expectations with the various aspects of the Galileo Commercial Service provision.

Further information on the Consultation is provided here.

Deadline for submission : 7 December 2017

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

GSA launches Galileo test campaign for GIS grade receivers

16.11.2017 10:48  
Published: 
16 November 2017

GSA is reaching out to receivers manufactures with a Galileo test campaign for GIS grade receivers.  Receivers will be tested using Signal in Space, and comparing GNSS constellations or their combinations both in a single frequency and dual frequency mode.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) has officially launched the Galileo test campaign for GIS grade receivers with the main objective to evaluate the receivers` performance, highlighting the added value of Galileo system for GIS Data Collection.

Testing with GSA provides, among others, the following advantages:

  • Independent tests: GSA will conduct neutral tests and provide objective results.
  • Flexible test cases: GSA can modify or add new test cases depending on the manufacturer's needs.
  • Two facilities equipped with state-of-the-art tools and instruments: GSA is collaborating with two laboratories (one at Thales Alenia Space Italy and the other at Airbus Defense and Space) to carry out the test cases.
  • Free of cost: The tests are completely free of charge to the manufacturers as the aim of the campaign is to support to the industry to leverage the benefits of Galileo.
  • Anonymous comparison of results: GSA provides the opportunity to compare results with other manufacturers in an anonymous way.

The scenarios of interest will be tested comparing the different GNSS constellations and their combinations both in a single frequency and dual frequency mode. All receivers will be tested using GNSS Signal in Space, so the test execution will be performed in parallel running all the receivers under test at the same time for each test case.

The tests will assess:

  • positioning accuracy under different conditions
  • time-to-first-fix
  • tracking capability

Sign up today!

Manufacturers are encouraged to take advantage of this opportunity, which is completely free-of-charge and on a voluntary basis. All results will be kept confidential and covered by individual non-disclosure agreements. For more information, contact the GSA Market Development Department (market@gsa.europa.eu) no later than 1 December 2017.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

H2020 Call for Proposals Now Open

15.11.2017 12:54  
Published: 
15 November 2017

Through its latest Horizon 2020 (H2020) call for proposals, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is seeking Galileo and EGNOS-enabled applications to meet the evolving needs of various market segments.

The new call for proposals focuses on two main activities:

  1. The development of innovative Galileo and EGNOS enabled applications in different market segments; and
  2. Raising awareness about and building capacity for European GNSS.

The aim of the first activity is to support the market uptake of European GNSS both in Europe and beyond. Proposed applications should leverage the differentiators of EGNOS and Galileo systems, including multi- frequency capability, high accuracy, authentication services, and better accuracy for single-frequency users. Proposed applications should have a commercial impact that will help foster green, safe and smart mobility, along with digitisation. Applications should also support societal resilience and contribute to environment protection.

The second activity is dedicated to the development of EGNSS competences. Proposals should focus on raising awareness and providing opportunities for creating networks of industrial relationships. Applications that facilitate international cooperation are also encouraged.

Overall, these two activities will maximise the adoption of Galileo and EGNOS. They will also support the European GNSS industry by contributing to its growth and competitiveness and by creating jobs and public benefits. 

The deadline for applications in all categories is 5 March 2019.

The topics of the call are the following:

EGNSS applications fostering green, safe and smart mobility

The main focus is on those applications that will lead to low emission, safer, more secure, lower cost and higher performance transport solutions able to respond to society’s increasing mobility needs. For example, within the aviation, road, maritime and rail sectors, this could include applications relating to advanced navigation, connected cars, vessel navigation or autonomous trains.

The indicative budget for this topic is EUR 10 million.

EGNSS applications fostering digitisation

Proposals should foster digitisation and integrate such digital technologies as the Internet of Things (IoT), cloud computing, big data and robotics. Specifically, funds will be awarded to those proposals that facilitate the adoption of EGNOS and Galileo in mass markets, encourage the competitiveness of the European GNSS industry in mobile applications, and maximise public benefits by addressing such societal challenges as health, citizen safety, mobility and regional growth. Preference will be given to those applications that make the best use of innovative EGNSS features like multipath resistance and authentication. Secure financial transactions, tracking solutions, augmented reality and commercial LBS are all examples of mass market applications that integrate digital technology.

The indicative budget for this category of applications is EUR 4 million.

EGNSS applications fostering societal resilience and protecting the environment

The main focus of this topic is on protecting the environment and promoting societal resilience through applications that support the wellbeing of EU citizens and emergency and disaster management. For example, search and rescue, surveying and mapping and efficient agriculture can all benefit from these types of applications. More specifically, as emergency and disaster management applications become increasingly important, they should integrate different sensors and position sources to better identify, locate and react in critical situations.

Successful proposals in this category will leverage Galileo and EGNOS differentiators in order to both increase effectiveness and reduce costs.

The indicative budget for this category of applications is EUR 4 million.

Awareness, networks and international cooperation

As it is more important than ever to raise awareness about E-GNSS competencies across EU Member States and Associated Countries, this call aims to support building industrial relationships by uniting private and public institutions around EGSS services. Proposals within this topic should support the competitiveness of EU industry by identifying strategic partners and developing market opportunities, promote incentive schemes and encourage the emergence of new downstream applications based on Galileo and EGNOS.

The indicative budget for this category of applications is EUR 2 million.

More information on the call is available here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The deadline for applications is 5 March 2019.

Galileo Public Regulated Service (PRS) application takes overall prize at ESNC awards in Tallinn

10.11.2017 12:24  
The ESNCC is an effective scouting and support mechanism for new European GNSS applications
Published: 
09 November 2017

The SORUS solution, developed by Alexander Rügamer from Fraunhofer IIS and Dr Jan Wendel from Airbus Defence and Space, significantly reduces the security requirements and Galileo PRS costs per user device, which means that police, Special Forces, and other authorised Galileo PRS users can exploit the application to equip their UAVs with a secure, trustworthy, solution that is resistant to jamming and spoofing.

The system enables user receivers to calculate Galileo PRS positions at predefined points in time and circumvents all the drawbacks of conventional PRS receivers and server-based techniques. For example, the solution does away with the need for a PRS security module on the user receiver, in addition to resolving problems related to size, weight and power. The application stores short sequences of Galileo PRS pseudo-random noise (PRN) code chips on user receivers prior to missions, which are only valid for the duration and area of a given mission.

An effective scouting and support mechanism

25 more business cases and challenge winners were also recognised at the awards ceremony by high-ranking industry and institutional representatives, including the European GNSS Agency (GSA), the European Space Agency (ESA), the German Aerospace Centre (DLR), the German Federal Ministry of Transport and Digital Infrastructure (BMVI) and the European Committee of the Regions (CoR). In addition, 20 partner regions from across the globe awarded the best competition entries.

GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides commented that the ESNC had once again proven to be an effective scouting and support mechanism for new European GNSS applications. “The GSA is proud to be a long-time partner in this useful initiative. The new applications inspired by this competition constantly advance the growth and use of GNSS technology,” he said.

Special Prizes

The SORUS project also received a Special Prize awarded by the German Federal Ministry of Transport and Digital Infrastructure (BMVI) and the Bavaria Challenge. This year’s GSA ‘EU at 60 – Space for Europe’ Special Prize went to CENTRIP (ChildrEN TRIp Protector), a project developed by Ewa Kodziolka of Poland to help teachers keep track of students during field trips and outings. For more on this innovative project, click here.

E-GNSS Accelerator

The ESNC is now additionally equipped with a new E-GNSS Accelerator. This programme is a unique opportunity for entrepreneurs and start-ups to accelerate their business case on a broad scale and bring their products and services to market. The E-GNSS Accelerator will run for three years and will directly support the winners of the ESNC 2017, 2018 and 2019. This programme offers the top three pitching start-ups access to dedicated incubation programmes at their preferred incubation centre of the ESNC network all across Europe worth EUR 180,000.

About ESNC

The ESNC annually awards the best services, products, and business ideas using satellite navigation in everyday life, spurring the development of respective market-driven applications. For 14 years, the international innovation competition has served as an accelerator for space‐related entrepreneurs and start-ups. Since 2004, over 11,500 developers have competed for an overall prize pool worth EUR 13 million, with more than 300 winners having been selected by 200 international judges. For more information on the ESNC, including all relevant information on prizes, partners, and terms of participation, visit the Competition’s official website: www.esnc.eu.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link the article back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Galileo Public Regulated Service (PRS) application takes overall prize at ESNC awards in Tallinn

10.11.2017 12:24  
The ESNCC is an effective scouting and support mechanism for new European GNSS applications
Published: 
09 November 2017

The SORUS solution, developed by Alexander Rügamer from Fraunhofer IIS and Dr Jan Wendel from Airbus Defence and Space, significantly reduces the security requirements and Galileo PRS costs per user device, which means that police, Special Forces, and other authorised Galileo PRS users can exploit the application to equip their UAVs with a secure, trustworthy, solution that is resistant to jamming and spoofing.

The system enables user receivers to calculate Galileo PRS positions at predefined points in time and circumvents all the drawbacks of conventional PRS receivers and server-based techniques. For example, the solution does away with the need for a PRS security module on the user receiver, in addition to resolving problems related to size, weight and power. The application stores short sequences of Galileo PRS pseudo-random noise (PRN) code chips on user receivers prior to missions, which are only valid for the duration and area of a given mission.

An effective scouting and support mechanism

The ESNCC is an effective scouting and support mechanism for new European GNSS applications

25 more business cases and challenge winners were also recognised at the awards ceremony by high-ranking industry and institutional representatives, including the European GNSS Agency (GSA), the European Space Agency (ESA), the German Aerospace Centre (DLR), the German Federal Ministry of Transport and Digital Infrastructure (BMVI) and the European Committee of the Regions (CoR). In addition, 20 partner regions from across the globe awarded the best competition entries.

GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides commented that the ESNC had once again proven to be an effective scouting and support mechanism for new European GNSS applications. “The GSA is proud to be a long-time partner in this useful initiative. The new applications inspired by this competition constantly advance the growth and use of GNSS technology,” he said.

Special Prizes

The SORUS project also received a Special Prize awarded by the German Federal Ministry of Transport and Digital Infrastructure (BMVI) and the Bavaria Challenge. This year’s GSA ‘EU at 60 – Space for Europe’ Special Prize went to CENTRIP (ChildrEN TRIp Protector), a project developed by Ewa Kodziolka of Poland to help teachers keep track of students during field trips and outings. For more on this innovative project, click here.

E-GNSS Accelerator

The ESNC is now additionally equipped with a new E-GNSS Accelerator. This programme is a unique opportunity for entrepreneurs and start-ups to accelerate their business case on a broad scale and bring their products and services to market. The E-GNSS Accelerator will run for three years and will directly support the winners of the ESNC 2017, 2018 and 2019. This programme offers the top three pitching start-ups access to dedicated incubation programmes at their preferred incubation centre of the ESNC network all across Europe worth EUR 180,000.

About ESNC

The ESNC annually awards the best services, products, and business ideas using satellite navigation in everyday life, spurring the development of respective market-driven applications. For 14 years, the international innovation competition has served as an accelerator for space‐related entrepreneurs and start-ups. Since 2004, over 11,500 developers have competed for an overall prize pool worth EUR 13 million, with more than 300 winners having been selected by 200 international judges. For more information on the ESNC, including all relevant information on prizes, partners, and terms of participation, visit the Competition’s official website: www.esnc.eu.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Galileo Public Regulated Service (PRS) application takes overall prize at ESNC awards in Tallinn

Winner of ‘EU at 60 – Space for Europe’ Special Prize Special Prize helps keep kids safe

10.11.2017 12:15  
The ESNCC is an effective scouting and support mechanism for new European GNSS applications
Published: 
09 November 2017

Kids are unpredictable and easily distracted – and any parent or teacher knows well how fast a kid can simply wander off. In fact, whenever a teacher takes a group of students outside the classroom, such as to go on a field trip, one of their greatest challenges – and causes of stress – is trying to keep track of everyone. There are simply too many tragedies that begin with a child wandering away from the group to not do everything possible to minimise this risk.

Now, thanks to the CENTRIP early warning system, teachers can utilise GNSS-enabled technology to constantly track and locate each individual student.

Giving teachers another set of eyes

The winner of this year’s GSA ‘EU at 60 – Space for Europe’ Special Prize at the European Satellite Navigation Conference (ESNC), CENTRIP (ChildrEN TRIp Protector) was developed out of the ESA/JRC summer school on GNSS. The CENTRIP team is led by Ewa Kadziolka and includes Philipp Muller, Terri Richardson, Yahao Cheng and Niccolo Gastaldello. “The idea behind CENTRIP is to increase the safety of children and lower the stress for teachers trying to keep track of a large group of students by using low-cost, easy to use technology,” she says. “For us, GNSS was clearly the way to go.”

GSA Executive Director Carlos des Dorides commented that the GSA Special Prize winner focussed on the protection of Europe’s most valuable asset - its children. “It is one of the first GNSS tracking systems to offer an affordable solution for simultaneously tracking multiple people. Plus, it is designed to work indoors, outdoors and even underground on a metro, so it can be effective in all learning environments,” he said.

CENTRIP combines GNSS (including Galileo) and ZigBee technology to set a geo-fence around a specified area. With the CENTRIP system, each child wears a lightweight, durable bracelet that contains a GNSS tracking device. Each teacher, on the other hand, is provided with an intuitive and easy-to-use device that helps track the location of each child.

If a student strays away from the group and outside the specified area, both the student and the teacher receive alerts. The audio alert on the child’s wristband is meant to get their attention, causing them to ‘look up’ and see that they’ve wandered away from the group, whereas the teacher’s alert shows the child’s location on the screen of their CENTRIP device. Using the tracking information, the teacher can then quickly and easily track and find the student before they wander out of sight. 

Ready for every type of field trip

According to Kadziolka, one of the key features of the device is its flexibility. “CENTRIP is designed to work indoors and outdoors and even underground on a metro, meaning it can be used in all learning environments,” she says. As a school group moves from, for example, the metro to a park and into a museum, the teacher can constantly adjust the parameters of the geo-fence based on the risk. “If a group is waiting for a metro, the teacher can keep the parameters within meters, but if they are in the park and they want to give the kids more freedom, the parameters can be easily expanded directly from their CENTRIP device.”

Thanks to the system’s use of GNSS, CENTRIP also offers an array of helpful location-based information. “Based on the group’s location, CENTRIP can

provide the teacher with the location of the closest hospital, a list of local emergency numbers and even stores where they can go and get necessary supplies,” explains Kadziolka. As an add-on feature, CENTRIP has the possibility to incorporate a SIM card, which adds an additional layer of protection so if a kid does happen to wander out of the system’s parameters, the teacher can still track their location using the same CENTRIP device.

From idea to reality

Ewa and the CENTRIP team now have the opportunity to make CENTRIP a reality. “We thought we had a good idea that could harness the power of European GNSS in order to keep kids safe,” she says. “Being awarded the Special Prize is a validation of the value that our idea will bring to schools across Europe and, hopefully someday, the world.”

Thanks to the support provided by the 60 Years of EU Special Prize, the team is now set to develop their idea at a suitable incubation centre of their choice within the EU28 for six months, with the option of a six-month extension based on an evaluation after the first six-month period (a total value of up to EUR 40,000).

About the GSA 60 Years of EU Prize

In celebration of the 60th anniversary of the signing of the Treaty of Rome, which laid the foundation for building the EU, the GSA 60 Years of EU Special Prize focused on the contribution that Europe’s space programmes – and in particular European GNSS – make to European integration. The prize was awarded during last night’s (7 November 2017) annual European Satellite Navigation Competition (ESNC) and Copernicus Masters ceremony, Europe’s pre-eminent innovation competitions for space applications.

The 2017 edition of the ESNC again received a remarkable number of entries. CENTRIP’s winning idea was competing against a total of 76 entries from 16 business sectors – including 28 start-ups, 11 SMEs, nine universities and 23 individuals.

“According to the GSA’s 2017 Market Report, personal tracking devices will soon become the fastest growing market within the LBS sector – with many solutions using Galileo for enhanced performances,” says GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. “CENTRIP is following this trend. The concept is unique as there is no such solution on the market that monitors groups of children.”

Des Dorides notes how the CENTRIP team is very motivated to enter the market. “They have a clear, convincing business plan that proves their aim to commercialise the product in the short term,” he adds. “In fact, CENTRIC already has potential customers, as some nurseries from Germany have expressed interest in wanting to implement the solution.”

The annual event recognises the most outstanding applications for Copernicus and European GNSS (Galileo and EGNOS) in various categories. Since 2014, the awards ceremony has been associated with the Satellite Masters Conference. The conference, which this year took place in Tallinn, Estonia and was a part of European Space Week, features an array of plenary sessions, workshops and roundtable discussions centred on leveraging satellite-derived data and other space solutions for business and society. It serves as a unique marketplace for sharing ideas on space-based innovation and connecting with the world’s leading network for downstream satellite businesses. 

CENTRIP Features

  • Accurate dual system location
  • Location tagging
  • Boundary setting
  • Band removal alert
  • Water resistant
  • View and track your GPS tracker in real time (optional)
  • Records full GNSS history for all journeys, showing addresses of locations visited and time spent at locations (optional)
  • Used by care-givers and families
  • Geo fencing (perimeter alert)
  • Movement alerts and warnings

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link the article back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Winner of ‘EU at 60 – Space for Europe’ Special Prize helps keep kids safe

10.11.2017 12:15  
The ESNCC is an effective scouting and support mechanism for new European GNSS applications
Published: 
09 November 2017

Kids are unpredictable and easily distracted – and any parent or teacher knows well how fast a kid can simply wander off. In fact, whenever a teacher takes a group of students outside the classroom, such as to go on a field trip, one of their greatest challenges – and causes of stress – is trying to keep track of everyone. There are simply too many tragedies that begin with a child wandering away from the group to not do everything possible to minimise this risk.

Now, thanks to the CENTRIP early warning system, teachers can utilise GNSS-enabled technology to constantly track and locate each individual student.

Giving teachers another set of eyes

The winner of this year’s GSA ‘EU at 60 – Space for Europe’ Special Prize at the European Satellite Navigation Conference (ESNC), CENTRIP (ChildrEN TRIp Protector) was developed out of the ESA/JRC summer school on GNSS. The CENTRIP team is led by Ewa Kadziolka and includes Philipp Muller, Terri Richardson, Yahao Cheng and Niccolo Gastaldello. “The idea behind CENTRIP is to increase the safety of children and lower the stress for teachers trying to keep track of a large group of students by using low-cost, easy to use technology,” she says. “For us, GNSS was clearly the way to go.”

GSA Executive Director Carlos des Dorides commented that the GSA Special Prize winner focussed on the protection of Europe’s most valuable asset - its children. “It is one of the first GNSS tracking systems to offer an affordable solution for simultaneously tracking multiple people. Plus, it is designed to work indoors, outdoors and even underground on a metro, so it can be effective in all learning environments,” he said.

CENTRIP combines GNSS (including Galileo) and ZigBee technology to set a geo-fence around a specified area. With the CENTRIP system, each child wears a lightweight, durable bracelet that contains a GNSS tracking device. Each teacher, on the other hand, is provided with an intuitive and easy-to-use device that helps track the location of each child.

If a student strays away from the group and outside the specified area, both the student and the teacher receive alerts. The audio alert on the child’s wristband is meant to get their attention, causing them to ‘look up’ and see that they’ve wandered away from the group, whereas the teacher’s alert shows the child’s location on the screen of their CENTRIP device. Using the tracking information, the teacher can then quickly and easily track and find the student before they wander out of sight. 

Ready for every type of field trip

According to Kadziolka, one of the key features of the device is its flexibility. “CENTRIP is designed to work indoors and outdoors and even underground on a metro, meaning it can be used in all learning environments,” she says. As a school group moves from, for example, the metro to a park and into a museum, the teacher can constantly adjust the parameters of the geo-fence based on the risk. “If a group is waiting for a metro, the teacher can keep the parameters within meters, but if they are in the park and they want to give the kids more freedom, the parameters can be easily expanded directly from their CENTRIP device.”

Thanks to the system’s use of GNSS, CENTRIP also offers an array of helpful location-based information. “Based on the group’s location, CENTRIP can

provide the teacher with the location of the closest hospital, a list of local emergency numbers and even stores where they can go and get necessary supplies,” explains Kadziolka. As an add-on feature, CENTRIP has the possibility to incorporate a SIM card, which adds an additional layer of protection so if a kid does happen to wander out of the system’s parameters, the teacher can still track their location using the same CENTRIP device.

From idea to reality

Ewa and the CENTRIP team now have the opportunity to make CENTRIP a reality. “We thought we had a good idea that could harness the power of European GNSS in order to keep kids safe,” she says. “Being awarded the Special Prize is a validation of the value that our idea will bring to schools across Europe and, hopefully someday, the world.”

Thanks to the support provided by the 60 Years of EU Special Prize, the team is now set to develop their idea at a suitable incubation centre of their choice within the EU28 for six months, with the option of a six-month extension based on an evaluation after the first six-month period (a total value of up to EUR 40,000).

About the GSA 60 Years of EU Prize

In celebration of the 60th anniversary of the signing of the Treaty of Rome, which laid the foundation for building the EU, the GSA 60 Years of EU Special Prize focused on the contribution that Europe’s space programmes – and in particular European GNSS – make to European integration. The prize was awarded during last night’s (7 November 2017) annual European Satellite Navigation Competition (ESNC) and Copernicus Masters ceremony, Europe’s pre-eminent innovation competitions for space applications.

The 2017 edition of the ESNC again received a remarkable number of entries. CENTRIP’s winning idea was competing against a total of 76 entries from 16 business sectors – including 28 start-ups, 11 SMEs, nine universities and 23 individuals.

“According to the GSA’s 2017 Market Report, personal tracking devices will soon become the fastest growing market within the LBS sector – with many solutions using Galileo for enhanced performances,” says GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. “CENTRIP is following this trend. The concept is unique as there is no such solution on the market that monitors groups of children.”

Des Dorides notes how the CENTRIP team is very motivated to enter the market. “They have a clear, convincing business plan that proves their aim to commercialise the product in the short term,” he adds. “In fact, CENTRIC already has potential customers, as some nurseries from Germany have expressed interest in wanting to implement the solution.”

The annual event recognises the most outstanding applications for Copernicus and European GNSS (Galileo and EGNOS) in various categories. Since 2014, the awards ceremony has been associated with the Satellite Masters Conference. The conference, which this year took place in Tallinn, Estonia and was a part of European Space Week, features an array of plenary sessions, workshops and roundtable discussions centred on leveraging satellite-derived data and other space solutions for business and society. It serves as a unique marketplace for sharing ideas on space-based innovation and connecting with the world’s leading network for downstream satellite businesses. 

CENTRIP Features

  • Accurate dual system location
  • Location tagging
  • Boundary setting
  • Band removal alert
  • Water resistant
  • View and track your GPS tracker in real time (optional)
  • Records full GNSS history for all journeys, showing addresses of locations visited and time spent at locations (optional)
  • Used by care-givers and families
  • Geo fencing (perimeter alert)
  • Movement alerts and warnings

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link the article back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Winner of ‘EU at 60 – Space for Europe’ Special Prize helps keep kids safe

10.11.2017 12:15  
The ESNCC is an effective scouting and support mechanism for new European GNSS applications
Published: 
09 November 2017

Kids are unpredictable and easily distracted – and any parent or teacher knows well how fast a kid can simply wander off. In fact, whenever a teacher takes a group of students outside the classroom, such as to go on a field trip, one of their greatest challenges – and causes of stress – is trying to keep track of everyone. There are simply too many tragedies that begin with a child wandering away from the group to not do everything possible to minimise this risk.

Now, thanks to the CENTRIP early warning system, teachers can utilise GNSS-enabled technology to constantly track and locate each individual student.

Giving teachers another set of eyes

The winner of this year’s GSA ‘EU at 60 – Space for Europe’ Special Prize at the European Satellite Navigation Conference (ESNC), CENTRIP (ChildrEN TRIp Protector) was developed out of the ESA/JRC summer school on GNSS. The CENTRIP team is led by Ewa Kadziolka and includes Philipp Muller, Terri Richardson, Yahao Cheng and Niccolo Gastaldello. “The idea behind CENTRIP is to increase the safety of children and lower the stress for teachers trying to keep track of a large group of students by using low-cost, easy to use technology,” she says. “For us, GNSS was clearly the way to go.”

GSA Executive Director Carlos des Dorides commented that the GSA Special Prize winner focussed on the protection of Europe’s most valuable asset - its children. “It is one of the first GNSS tracking systems to offer an affordable solution for simultaneously tracking multiple people. Plus, it is designed to work indoors, outdoors and even underground on a metro, so it can be effective in all learning environments,” he said.

CENTRIP combines GNSS (including Galileo) and ZigBee technology to set a geo-fence around a specified area. With the CENTRIP system, each child wears a lightweight, durable bracelet that contains a GNSS tracking device. Each teacher, on the other hand, is provided with an intuitive and easy-to-use device that helps track the location of each child.

If a student strays away from the group and outside the specified area, both the student and the teacher receive alerts. The audio alert on the child’s wristband is meant to get their attention, causing them to ‘look up’ and see that they’ve wandered away from the group, whereas the teacher’s alert shows the child’s location on the screen of their CENTRIP device. Using the tracking information, the teacher can then quickly and easily track and find the student before they wander out of sight. 

Ready for every type of field trip

According to Kadziolka, one of the key features of the device is its flexibility. “CENTRIP is designed to work indoors and outdoors and even underground on a metro, meaning it can be used in all learning environments,” she says. As a school group moves from, for example, the metro to a park and into a museum, the teacher can constantly adjust the parameters of the geo-fence based on the risk. “If a group is waiting for a metro, the teacher can keep the parameters within meters, but if they are in the park and they want to give the kids more freedom, the parameters can be easily expanded directly from their CENTRIP device.”

Thanks to the system’s use of GNSS, CENTRIP also offers an array of helpful location-based information. “Based on the group’s location, CENTRIP can

provide the teacher with the location of the closest hospital, a list of local emergency numbers and even stores where they can go and get necessary supplies,” explains Kadziolka. As an add-on feature, CENTRIP has the possibility to incorporate a SIM card, which adds an additional layer of protection so if a kid does happen to wander out of the system’s parameters, the teacher can still track their location using the same CENTRIP device.

From idea to reality

Ewa and the CENTRIP team now have the opportunity to make CENTRIP a reality. “We thought we had a good idea that could harness the power of European GNSS in order to keep kids safe,” she says. “Being awarded the Special Prize is a validation of the value that our idea will bring to schools across Europe and, hopefully someday, the world.”

Thanks to the support provided by the 60 Years of EU Special Prize, the team is now set to develop their idea at a suitable incubation centre of their choice within the EU28 for six months, with the option of a six-month extension based on an evaluation after the first six-month period (a total value of up to EUR 40,000).

About the GSA 60 Years of EU Prize

In celebration of the 60th anniversary of the signing of the Treaty of Rome, which laid the foundation for building the EU, the GSA 60 Years of EU Special Prize focused on the contribution that Europe’s space programmes – and in particular European GNSS – make to European integration. The prize was awarded during last night’s (7 November 2017) annual European Satellite Navigation Competition (ESNC) and Copernicus Masters ceremony, Europe’s pre-eminent innovation competitions for space applications.

The 2017 edition of the ESNC again received a remarkable number of entries. CENTRIP’s winning idea was competing against a total of 76 entries from 16 business sectors – including 28 start-ups, 11 SMEs, nine universities and 23 individuals.

“According to the GSA’s 2017 Market Report, personal tracking devices will soon become the fastest growing market within the LBS sector – with many solutions using Galileo for enhanced performances,” says GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. “CENTRIP is following this trend. The concept is unique as there is no such solution on the market that monitors groups of children.”

Des Dorides notes how the CENTRIP team is very motivated to enter the market. “They have a clear, convincing business plan that proves their aim to commercialise the product in the short term,” he adds. “In fact, CENTRIC already has potential customers, as some nurseries from Germany have expressed interest in wanting to implement the solution.”

The annual event recognises the most outstanding applications for Copernicus and European GNSS (Galileo and EGNOS) in various categories. Since 2014, the awards ceremony has been associated with the Satellite Masters Conference. The conference, which this year took place in Tallinn, Estonia and was a part of European Space Week, features an array of plenary sessions, workshops and roundtable discussions centred on leveraging satellite-derived data and other space solutions for business and society. It serves as a unique marketplace for sharing ideas on space-based innovation and connecting with the world’s leading network for downstream satellite businesses. 

CENTRIP Features

  • Accurate dual system location
  • Location tagging
  • Boundary setting
  • Band removal alert
  • Water resistant
  • View and track your GPS tracker in real time (optional)
  • Records full GNSS history for all journeys, showing addresses of locations visited and time spent at locations (optional)
  • Used by care-givers and families
  • Geo fencing (perimeter alert)
  • Movement alerts and warnings

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link the article back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The ESNCC is an effective scouting and support mechanism for new European GNSS applications

Winner of ‘EU at 60 – Space for Europe’ Special Prize helps keep kids safe

10.11.2017 12:15  
Winner of ‘EU at 60 – Space for Europe’ Special Prize helps keep kids safe
Published: 
09 November 2017

Kids are unpredictable and easily distracted – and any parent or teacher knows well how fast a kid can simply wander off. In fact, whenever a teacher takes a group of students outside the classroom, such as to go on a field trip, one of their greatest challenges – and causes of stress – is trying to keep track of everyone. There are simply too many tragedies that begin with a child wandering away from the group to not do everything possible to minimise this risk.

Now, thanks to the CENTRIP early warning system, teachers can utilise GNSS-enabled technology to constantly track and locate each individual student.

Giving teachers another set of eyes

The winner of this year’s GSA ‘EU at 60 – Space for Europe’ Special Prize at the European Satellite Navigation Conference (ESNC), CENTRIP (ChildrEN TRIp Protector) was developed out of the ESA/JRC summer school on GNSS. The CENTRIP team is led by Ewa Kadziolka and includes Philipp Muller, Terri Richardson, Yahao Cheng and Niccolo Gastaldello. “The idea behind CENTRIP is to increase the safety of children and lower the stress for teachers trying to keep track of a large group of students by using low-cost, easy to use technology,” she says. “For us, GNSS was clearly the way to go.”

GSA Executive Director Carlos des Dorides commented that the GSA Special Prize winner focussed on the protection of Europe’s most valuable asset - its children. “It is one of the first GNSS tracking systems to offer an affordable solution for simultaneously tracking multiple people. Plus, it is designed to work indoors, outdoors and even underground on a metro, so it can be effective in all learning environments,” he said.

CENTRIP combines GNSS (including Galileo) and ZigBee technology to set a geo-fence around a specified area. With the CENTRIP system, each child wears a lightweight, durable bracelet that contains a GNSS tracking device. Each teacher, on the other hand, is provided with an intuitive and easy-to-use device that helps track the location of each child.

If a student strays away from the group and outside the specified area, both the student and the teacher receive alerts. The audio alert on the child’s wristband is meant to get their attention, causing them to ‘look up’ and see that they’ve wandered away from the group, whereas the teacher’s alert shows the child’s location on the screen of their CENTRIP device. Using the tracking information, the teacher can then quickly and easily track and find the student before they wander out of sight. 

Ready for every type of field trip

According to Kadziolka, one of the key features of the device is its flexibility. “CENTRIP is designed to work indoors and outdoors and even underground on a metro, meaning it can be used in all learning environments,” she says. As a school group moves from, for example, the metro to a park and into a museum, the teacher can constantly adjust the parameters of the geo-fence based on the risk. “If a group is waiting for a metro, the teacher can keep the parameters within meters, but if they are in the park and they want to give the kids more freedom, the parameters can be easily expanded directly from their CENTRIP device.”

Thanks to the system’s use of GNSS, CENTRIP also offers an array of helpful location-based information. “Based on the group’s location, CENTRIP can

provide the teacher with the location of the closest hospital, a list of local emergency numbers and even stores where they can go and get necessary supplies,” explains Kadziolka. As an add-on feature, CENTRIP has the possibility to incorporate a SIM card, which adds an additional layer of protection so if a kid does happen to wander out of the system’s parameters, the teacher can still track their location using the same CENTRIP device.

From idea to reality

Ewa and the CENTRIP team now have the opportunity to make CENTRIP a reality. “We thought we had a good idea that could harness the power of European GNSS in order to keep kids safe,” she says. “Being awarded the Special Prize is a validation of the value that our idea will bring to schools across Europe and, hopefully someday, the world.”

Thanks to the support provided by the 60 Years of EU Special Prize, the team is now set to develop their idea at a suitable incubation centre of their choice within the EU28 for six months, with the option of a six-month extension based on an evaluation after the first six-month period (a total value of up to EUR 40,000).

About the GSA 60 Years of EU Prize

In celebration of the 60th anniversary of the signing of the Treaty of Rome, which laid the foundation for building the EU, the GSA 60 Years of EU Special Prize focused on the contribution that Europe’s space programmes – and in particular European GNSS – make to European integration. The prize was awarded during last night’s (7 November 2017) annual European Satellite Navigation Competition (ESNC) and Copernicus Masters ceremony, Europe’s pre-eminent innovation competitions for space applications.

The 2017 edition of the ESNC again received a remarkable number of entries. CENTRIP’s winning idea was competing against a total of 76 entries from 16 business sectors – including 28 start-ups, 11 SMEs, nine universities and 23 individuals.

“According to the GSA’s 2017 Market Report, personal tracking devices will soon become the fastest growing market within the LBS sector – with many solutions using Galileo for enhanced performances,” says GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. “CENTRIP is following this trend. The concept is unique as there is no such solution on the market that monitors groups of children.”

Des Dorides notes how the CENTRIP team is very motivated to enter the market. “They have a clear, convincing business plan that proves their aim to commercialise the product in the short term,” he adds. “In fact, CENTRIC already has potential customers, as some nurseries from Germany have expressed interest in wanting to implement the solution.”

The annual event recognises the most outstanding applications for Copernicus and European GNSS (Galileo and EGNOS) in various categories. Since 2014, the awards ceremony has been associated with the Satellite Masters Conference. The conference, which this year took place in Tallinn, Estonia and was a part of European Space Week, features an array of plenary sessions, workshops and roundtable discussions centred on leveraging satellite-derived data and other space solutions for business and society. It serves as a unique marketplace for sharing ideas on space-based innovation and connecting with the world’s leading network for downstream satellite businesses. 

CENTRIP Features

  • Accurate dual system location
  • Location tagging
  • Boundary setting
  • Band removal alert
  • Water resistant
  • View and track your GPS tracker in real time (optional)
  • Records full GNSS history for all journeys, showing addresses of locations visited and time spent at locations (optional)
  • Used by care-givers and families
  • Geo fencing (perimeter alert)
  • Movement alerts and warnings

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link the article back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Winner of ‘EU at 60 – Space for Europe’ Special Prize helps keep kids safe

Winner of ‘EU at 60 – Space for Europe’ Special Prize helps keep kids safe

10.11.2017 12:15  
ESNC GSA special prize
Published: 
09 November 2017

Kids are unpredictable and easily distracted – and any parent or teacher knows well how fast a kid can simply wander off. In fact, whenever a teacher takes a group of students outside the classroom, such as to go on a field trip, one of their greatest challenges – and causes of stress – is trying to keep track of everyone. There are simply too many tragedies that begin with a child wandering away from the group to not do everything possible to minimise this risk.

Now, thanks to the CENTRIP early warning system, teachers can utilise GNSS-enabled technology to constantly track and locate each individual student.

Giving teachers another set of eyes

The winner of this year’s GSA ‘EU at 60 – Space for Europe’ Special Prize at the European Satellite Navigation Conference (ESNC), CENTRIP (ChildrEN TRIp Protector) was developed out of the ESA/JRC summer school on GNSS. The CENTRIP team is led by Ewa Kadziolka and includes Philipp Muller, Terri Richardson, Yahao Cheng and Niccolo Gastaldello. “The idea behind CENTRIP is to increase the safety of children and lower the stress for teachers trying to keep track of a large group of students by using low-cost, easy to use technology,” she says. “For us, GNSS was clearly the way to go.”

GSA Executive Director Carlos des Dorides commented that the GSA Special Prize winner focussed on the protection of Europe’s most valuable asset - its children. “It is one of the first GNSS tracking systems to offer an affordable solution for simultaneously tracking multiple people. Plus, it is designed to work indoors, outdoors and even underground on a metro, so it can be effective in all learning environments,” he said.

CENTRIP combines GNSS (including Galileo) and ZigBee technology to set a geo-fence around a specified area. With the CENTRIP system, each child wears a lightweight, durable bracelet that contains a GNSS tracking device. Each teacher, on the other hand, is provided with an intuitive and easy-to-use device that helps track the location of each child.

If a student strays away from the group and outside the specified area, both the student and the teacher receive alerts. The audio alert on the child’s wristband is meant to get their attention, causing them to ‘look up’ and see that they’ve wandered away from the group, whereas the teacher’s alert shows the child’s location on the screen of their CENTRIP device. Using the tracking information, the teacher can then quickly and easily track and find the student before they wander out of sight. 

Ready for every type of field trip

According to Kadziolka, one of the key features of the device is its flexibility. “CENTRIP is designed to work indoors and outdoors and even underground on a metro, meaning it can be used in all learning environments,” she says. As a school group moves from, for example, the metro to a park and into a museum, the teacher can constantly adjust the parameters of the geo-fence based on the risk. “If a group is waiting for a metro, the teacher can keep the parameters within meters, but if they are in the park and they want to give the kids more freedom, the parameters can be easily expanded directly from their CENTRIP device.”

Thanks to the system’s use of GNSS, CENTRIP also offers an array of helpful location-based information. “Based on the group’s location, CENTRIP can

provide the teacher with the location of the closest hospital, a list of local emergency numbers and even stores where they can go and get necessary supplies,” explains Kadziolka. As an add-on feature, CENTRIP has the possibility to incorporate a SIM card, which adds an additional layer of protection so if a kid does happen to wander out of the system’s parameters, the teacher can still track their location using the same CENTRIP device.

From idea to reality

Ewa and the CENTRIP team now have the opportunity to make CENTRIP a reality. “We thought we had a good idea that could harness the power of European GNSS in order to keep kids safe,” she says. “Being awarded the Special Prize is a validation of the value that our idea will bring to schools across Europe and, hopefully someday, the world.”

Thanks to the support provided by the 60 Years of EU Special Prize, the team is now set to develop their idea at a suitable incubation centre of their choice within the EU28 for six months, with the option of a six-month extension based on an evaluation after the first six-month period (a total value of up to EUR 40,000).

About the GSA 60 Years of EU Prize

In celebration of the 60th anniversary of the signing of the Treaty of Rome, which laid the foundation for building the EU, the GSA 60 Years of EU Special Prize focused on the contribution that Europe’s space programmes – and in particular European GNSS – make to European integration. The prize was awarded during last night’s (7 November 2017) annual European Satellite Navigation Competition (ESNC) and Copernicus Masters ceremony, Europe’s pre-eminent innovation competitions for space applications.

The 2017 edition of the ESNC again received a remarkable number of entries. CENTRIP’s winning idea was competing against a total of 76 entries from 16 business sectors – including 28 start-ups, 11 SMEs, nine universities and 23 individuals.

“According to the GSA’s 2017 Market Report, personal tracking devices will soon become the fastest growing market within the LBS sector – with many solutions using Galileo for enhanced performances,” says GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. “CENTRIP is following this trend. The concept is unique as there is no such solution on the market that monitors groups of children.”

Des Dorides notes how the CENTRIP team is very motivated to enter the market. “They have a clear, convincing business plan that proves their aim to commercialise the product in the short term,” he adds. “In fact, CENTRIC already has potential customers, as some nurseries from Germany have expressed interest in wanting to implement the solution.”

The annual event recognises the most outstanding applications for Copernicus and European GNSS (Galileo and EGNOS) in various categories. Since 2014, the awards ceremony has been associated with the Satellite Masters Conference. The conference, which this year took place in Tallinn, Estonia and was a part of European Space Week, features an array of plenary sessions, workshops and roundtable discussions centred on leveraging satellite-derived data and other space solutions for business and society. It serves as a unique marketplace for sharing ideas on space-based innovation and connecting with the world’s leading network for downstream satellite businesses. 

CENTRIP Features

  • Accurate dual system location
  • Location tagging
  • Boundary setting
  • Band removal alert
  • Water resistant
  • View and track your GPS tracker in real time (optional)
  • Records full GNSS history for all journeys, showing addresses of locations visited and time spent at locations (optional)
  • Used by care-givers and families
  • Geo fencing (perimeter alert)
  • Movement alerts and warnings

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link the article back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Winner of ‘EU at 60 – Space for Europe’ Special Prize helps keep kids safe

Winner of ‘EU at 60 – Space for Europe’ Special Prize helps keep kids safe

10.11.2017 12:15  
ESNC GSA special prize
Published: 
09 November 2017

Kids are unpredictable and easily distracted – and any parent or teacher knows well how fast a kid can simply wander off. In fact, whenever a teacher takes a group of students outside the classroom, such as to go on a field trip, one of their greatest challenges – and causes of stress – is trying to keep track of everyone. There are simply too many tragedies that begin with a child wandering away from the group to not do everything possible to minimise this risk.

Now, thanks to the CENTRIP early warning system, teachers can utilise GNSS-enabled technology to constantly track and locate each individual student.

Giving teachers another set of eyes

The winner of this year’s GSA ‘EU at 60 – Space for Europe’ Special Prize at the European Satellite Navigation Conference (ESNC), CENTRIP (ChildrEN TRIp Protector) was developed out of the ESA/JRC summer school on GNSS. The CENTRIP team is led by Ewa Kadziolka and includes Philipp Muller, Terri Richardson, Yahao Cheng and Niccolo Gastaldello. “The idea behind CENTRIP is to increase the safety of children and lower the stress for teachers trying to keep track of a large group of students by using low-cost, easy to use technology,” she says. “For us, GNSS was clearly the way to go.”

GSA Executive Director Carlos des Dorides commented that the GSA Special Prize winner focussed on the protection of Europe’s most valuable asset - its children. “It is one of the first GNSS tracking systems to offer an affordable solution for simultaneously tracking multiple people. Plus, it is designed to work indoors, outdoors and even underground on a metro, so it can be effective in all learning environments,” he said.

CENTRIP combines GNSS (including Galileo) and ZigBee technology to set a geo-fence around a specified area. With the CENTRIP system, each child wears a lightweight, durable bracelet that contains a GNSS tracking device. Each teacher, on the other hand, is provided with an intuitive and easy-to-use device that helps track the location of each child.

If a student strays away from the group and outside the specified area, both the student and the teacher receive alerts. The audio alert on the child’s wristband is meant to get their attention, causing them to ‘look up’ and see that they’ve wandered away from the group, whereas the teacher’s alert shows the child’s location on the screen of their CENTRIP device. Using the tracking information, the teacher can then quickly and easily track and find the student before they wander out of sight. 

Ready for every type of field trip

According to Kadziolka, one of the key features of the device is its flexibility. “CENTRIP is designed to work indoors and outdoors and even underground on a metro, meaning it can be used in all learning environments,” she says. As a school group moves from, for example, the metro to a park and into a museum, the teacher can constantly adjust the parameters of the geo-fence based on the risk. “If a group is waiting for a metro, the teacher can keep the parameters within meters, but if they are in the park and they want to give the kids more freedom, the parameters can be easily expanded directly from their CENTRIP device.”

Thanks to the system’s use of GNSS, CENTRIP also offers an array of helpful location-based information. “Based on the group’s location, CENTRIP can

provide the teacher with the location of the closest hospital, a list of local emergency numbers and even stores where they can go and get necessary supplies,” explains Kadziolka. As an add-on feature, CENTRIP has the possibility to incorporate a SIM card, which adds an additional layer of protection so if a kid does happen to wander out of the system’s parameters, the teacher can still track their location using the same CENTRIP device.

From idea to reality

Ewa and the CENTRIP team now have the opportunity to make CENTRIP a reality. “We thought we had a good idea that could harness the power of European GNSS in order to keep kids safe,” she says. “Being awarded the Special Prize is a validation of the value that our idea will bring to schools across Europe and, hopefully someday, the world.”

Thanks to the support provided by the 60 Years of EU Special Prize, the team is now set to develop their idea at a suitable incubation centre of their choice within the EU28 for six months, with the option of a six-month extension based on an evaluation after the first six-month period (a total value of up to EUR 40,000).

About the GSA 60 Years of EU Prize

In celebration of the 60th anniversary of the signing of the Treaty of Rome, which laid the foundation for building the EU, the GSA 60 Years of EU Special Prize focused on the contribution that Europe’s space programmes – and in particular European GNSS – make to European integration. The prize was awarded during last night’s (7 November 2017) annual European Satellite Navigation Competition (ESNC) and Copernicus Masters ceremony, Europe’s pre-eminent innovation competitions for space applications.

The 2017 edition of the ESNC again received a remarkable number of entries. CENTRIP’s winning idea was competing against a total of 76 entries from 16 business sectors – including 28 start-ups, 11 SMEs, nine universities and 23 individuals.

“According to the GSA’s 2017 Market Report, personal tracking devices will soon become the fastest growing market within the LBS sector – with many solutions using Galileo for enhanced performances,” says GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. “CENTRIP is following this trend. The concept is unique as there is no such solution on the market that monitors groups of children.”

Des Dorides notes how the CENTRIP team is very motivated to enter the market. “They have a clear, convincing business plan that proves their aim to commercialise the product in the short term,” he adds. “In fact, CENTRIC already has potential customers, as some nurseries from Germany have expressed interest in wanting to implement the solution.”

The annual event recognises the most outstanding applications for Copernicus and European GNSS (Galileo and EGNOS) in various categories. Since 2014, the awards ceremony has been associated with the Satellite Masters Conference. The conference, which this year took place in Tallinn, Estonia and was a part of European Space Week, features an array of plenary sessions, workshops and roundtable discussions centred on leveraging satellite-derived data and other space solutions for business and society. It serves as a unique marketplace for sharing ideas on space-based innovation and connecting with the world’s leading network for downstream satellite businesses. 

CENTRIP Features

  • Accurate dual system location
  • Location tagging
  • Boundary setting
  • Band removal alert
  • Water resistant
  • View and track your GPS tracker in real time (optional)
  • Records full GNSS history for all journeys, showing addresses of locations visited and time spent at locations (optional)
  • Used by care-givers and families
  • Geo fencing (perimeter alert)
  • Movement alerts and warnings

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link the article back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Winner of ‘EU at 60 – Space for Europe’ Special Prize helps keep kids safe

EGNOS’s annual workshop captures state-of-play and state-of-the-art

31.10.2017 10:04  
Published: 
31 October 2017

The EGNOS Annual Workshop is an opportunity to catch up on the latest state-of-play and state-of-the-art in Europe’s satellite-based augmentation system (SBAS). Another year and again goals have been met, there are more and more users and EGNOS continues to forge forward in accuracy and reliability.

The EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey 2016 shows that users were happy with EGNOS’s outstanding performance. The signal (Signal in Space) was available 100% of the time, with excellent monthly performance. Airport authorities spoke highly of the support offered to users, thanking for the speed of their response to any enquiries. GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides noted: “EGNOS has a good story to tell, we have 250 airports with more than 450 approach procedures.”

EDAS, which delivers data to users who cannot always view the EGNOS’s satellites (such as in urban canyons) or to support a variety of other value added services, applications and research programmes also worked well, with almost 99% availability.

Watch this: ESSP - EGNOS Satellite Navigation Systems

The workshop offered a chance to hear from users. Dominic Hysam from Easyjet said EGNOS brings great benefits: “It provides precise guidance at airports where we don’t get that currently. It can provide precision approaches at secondary airports; this benefits us from a safety perspective and allows us to operate in different weather conditions, improving accessibility at those airports.” There is ever increasing pressure on airlines to deliver reliable services to their customers. Hysam added: “EGNOS means we are better at getting customers to where they want to go.”

Alexander Desyllas of the Hellenic Civil Aviation Authority, which manages many airports, said: “We are encouraging all to adopt EGNOS now. It brings huge benefits, direct approaches and means not having to depend on conventional ground installations, this is a very important advantage.”

Reaching out

Other sectors are also reaping the benefits. Des Dorides said: “Even if civil aviation is the main natural-market segment, it is proving to be more and more valuable for other sectors, such as maritime and rail. Next year there will be a new regulation coming into place requiring EGNOS and Galileo capability on all new cars produced in Europe.”

Seventy-five percent of maritime receiver models are now SBAS enabled – in the agricultural sector, 80% of European GNSS enabled tractors are using EGNOS.

Reaching further

EGNOS is also reaching further afield. EGNOS technology has been made available to South Korea, to develop its own KASS system and related services. Julien Lapie, who works for the Agency for Air Navigation Safety in Africa and Madagascar (ASECNA), which manages a major part of the African and Indian Ocean airspace, said that EGNOS will bring huge benefits to flight efficiency and safety. Lapie said that this lent itself particularly well to airports in remote areas with difficult access, due to the unrequired local ground infrastructure and staff.

What next?

The GSA and EGNOS never stand still, Des Dorides said: “In the year ahead, we will start with a major technology development that will bring dual-frequency use; and the overlay on Galileo which will bring even more robust and accurate use. This will be ready in 2023-2025.”

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey 2016 shows users are happy with EGNOS’s outstanding performance

EGNOS’ annual workshop captures state-of-play and state-of-the-art

31.10.2017 10:04  
Published: 
31 October 2017

The EGNOS Annual Workshop is an opportunity to catch up on the latest state-of-play and state-of-the-art in Europe’s satellite-based augmentation system (SBAS). Another year and again goals have been met, there are more and more users and EGNOS continues to forge forward in accuracy and reliability.

The EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey 2016 shows that users were happy with EGNOS’ outstanding performance. The signal (Signal in Space) was available 100% of the time, with excellent monthly performance. Airport authorities spoke highly of the support offered to users, thanking for the speed of their response to any enquiries. GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides noted: “EGNOS has a good story to tell, we have 250 airports with more than 450 approach procedures.”

EDAS, which delivers data to users who cannot always view the EGNOS’ satellites (such as in urban canyons) or to support a variety of other value added services, applications and research programmes also worked well, with almost 99% availability.

Watch this: ESSP - EGNOS Satellite Navigation Systems

The workshop offered a chance to hear from users. Dominic Hysam from Easyjet said EGNOS brings great benefits: “It provides precise guidance at airports where we don’t get that currently. It can provide precision approaches at secondary airports; this benefits us from a safety perspective and allows us to operate in different weather conditions, improving accessibility at those airports.” There is ever increasing pressure on airlines to deliver reliable services to their customers. Hysam added: “EGNOS means we are better at getting customers to where they want to go.”

Alexander Desyllas of the Hellenic Civil Aviation Authority, which manages many airports, said: “We are encouraging all to adopt EGNOS now. It brings huge benefits, direct approaches and means not having to depend on conventional ground installations, this is a very important advantage.”

Reaching out

Other sectors are also reaping the benefits. Des Dorides said: “Even if civil aviation is the main natural-market segment, it is proving to be more and more valuable for other sectors, such as maritime and rail. Next year there will be a new regulation coming into place requiring EGNOS and Galileo capability on all new cars produced in Europe.”

Seventy-five percent of maritime receiver models are now SBAS enabled – in the agricultural sector, 80% of European GNSS enabled tractors are using EGNOS.

Reaching further

EGNOS is also reaching further afield. EGNOS technology has been made available to South Korea, to develop its own KASS system and related services. Julien Lapie, who works for the Agency for Air Navigation Safety in Africa and Madagascar (ASECNA), which manages a major part of the African and Indian Ocean airspace, said that EGNOS will bring huge benefits to flight efficiency and safety. Lapie said that this lent itself particularly well to airports in remote areas with difficult access, due to the unrequired local ground infrastructure and staff.

What next?

The GSA and EGNOS never stand still, Des Dorides said: “In the year ahead, we will start with a major technology development that will bring dual-frequency use; and the overlay on Galileo which will bring even more robust and accurate use. This will be ready in 2023-2025.”

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey 2016 shows users are happy with EGNOS’s outstanding performance

EGNOS’ annual workshop captures state-of-play and state-of-the-art

31.10.2017 10:04  
Published: 
31 October 2017

The EGNOS Annual Workshop is an opportunity to catch up on the latest state-of-play and state-of-the-art in Europe’s satellite-based augmentation system (SBAS). Another year and again goals have been met, there are more and more users and EGNOS continues to forge forward in accuracy and reliability.

The EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey 2016 shows that users were happy with EGNOS’ outstanding performance. The signal (Signal in Space) was available 100% of the time, with excellent monthly performance. Airport authorities spoke highly of the support offered to users, thanking for the speed of their response to any enquiries. GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides noted: “EGNOS has a good story to tell, we have 250 airports with more than 450 approach procedures.”

EDAS, which delivers data to users who cannot always view the EGNOS’ satellites (such as in urban canyons) or to support a variety of other value added services, applications and research programmes also worked well, with almost 99% availability.

Watch this: ESSP - EGNOS Satellite Navigation Systems

The workshop offered a chance to hear from users. Dominic Hysam from Easyjet said EGNOS brings great benefits: “It provides precise guidance at airports where we don’t get that currently. It can provide precision approaches at secondary airports; this benefits us from a safety perspective and allows us to operate in different weather conditions, improving accessibility at those airports.” There is ever increasing pressure on airlines to deliver reliable services to their customers. Hysam added: “EGNOS means we are better at getting customers to where they want to go.”

Alexander Desyllas of the Hellenic Civil Aviation Authority, which manages many airports, said: “We are encouraging all to adopt EGNOS now. It brings huge benefits, direct approaches and means not having to depend on conventional ground installations, this is a very important advantage.”

Reaching out

Other sectors are also reaping the benefits. Des Dorides said: “Even if civil aviation is the main natural-market segment, it is proving to be more and more valuable for other sectors, such as maritime and rail. Next year there will be a new regulation coming into place requiring EGNOS and Galileo capability on all new cars produced in Europe.”

Seventy-five percent of maritime receiver models are now SBAS enabled – in the agricultural sector, 80% of European GNSS enabled tractors are using EGNOS.

Reaching further

EGNOS is also reaching further afield. EGNOS technology has been made available to South Korea, to develop its own KASS system and related services. Julien Lapie, who works for the Agency for Air Navigation Safety in Africa and Madagascar (ASECNA), which manages a major part of the African and Indian Ocean airspace, said that EGNOS will bring huge benefits to flight efficiency and safety. Lapie said that this lent itself particularly well to airports in remote areas with difficult access, due to the unrequired local ground infrastructure and staff.

What next?

The GSA and EGNOS never stand still, Des Dorides said: “In the year ahead, we will start with a major technology development that will bring dual-frequency use; and the overlay on Galileo which will bring even more robust and accurate use. This will be ready in 2023-2025.”

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey 2016 shows users are happy with EGNOS’s outstanding performance

Last chance to start your Space3ac adventure and apply for financial support

30.10.2017 11:41  
Published: 
30 October 2017

The latest recruitment drive for Space3ac, a three-month acceleration programme for start-ups using satellite technologies to create solutions for the intermodal transportation, oil and gas and insurance sectors, is set to end at midnight on Tuesday, 31 October 2017. Interested start-ups with capabilities to solve problems provided by industry partners should “raise their hands” and register (by filling out a short form) on the programme’s website. The recruitment process will continue with interviews and meetings on 20-21 November.

The Space3ac programme aims to solve problems experienced by transportation, oil and gas and insurance industry stakeholders by connecting them to start-ups with new ideas based on Earth observation, GNSS, telecommunications or integrated applications. In addition to PLN 200 000 (EUR 47,000) in cash, the start-ups will receive access to over 40 international technical and business mentors, be given a place to develop their business ideas, and be introduced to investors from all over the world.

Basic space industry knowledge required

The programme is looking for teams that have an early prototype or minimum viable product (MVP) of their solution, with a technology readiness level of at least 2. The teams should also have at least basic knowledge of the space industry and downstream sector and include experts with multidisciplinary skills. You can find all of the terms and conditions for participation here.

Some of the more than 30 problems that the start-ups will aim to resolve include designing and implementing an intelligent monitoring system for the electrical power system at the Port of Gdynia; intelligent surveillance of safe navigation in the inner harbour of the Port of Gdansk; and an IT system allowing the handling of wheeled vehicle transport for OT Logistics, among others. The full list of problems to be solved is available on the website.

In the second call, the programme has money to support 13 start-ups. Initially, at least 18 will be invited to take part in the programme and, after the first month of the acceleration phase a decision will be made on which teams can advance further. The selected projects will work for three months to develop their business, after which they will have an opportunity to pitch their ideas and attract investors to develop their business further.

For more information, check out the programme’s website.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Space3ac gives start-ups working with EO, GNSS and integrated applications access to international mentors and investors and the opportunity to develop their business.

Last chance to start your Space3ac adventure and apply for financial support

30.10.2017 11:41  
Published: 
30 October 2017

The latest recruitment drive for Space3ac, a three-month acceleration programme for start-ups using satellite technologies to create solutions for the intermodal transportation, oil and gas and insurance sectors, is set to end at midnight on Tuesday, 31 October 2017. Interested start-ups with capabilities to solve problems provided by industry partners should “raise their hands” and register (by filling out a short form) on the programme’s website. The recruitment process will continue with interviews and meetings on 20-21 November.

The Space3ac programme aims to solve problems experienced by transportation, oil and gas and insurance industry stakeholders by connecting them to start-ups with new ideas based on Earth observation, GNSS, telecommunications or integrated applications. In addition to PLN 200 000 (EUR 47,000) in cash, the start-ups will receive access to over 40 international technical and business mentors, be given a place to develop their business ideas, and be introduced to investors from all over the world.

Basic space industry knowledge required

The programme is looking for teams that have an early prototype or minimum viable product (MVP) of their solution, with a technology readiness level of at least 2. The teams should also have at least basic knowledge of the space industry and downstream sector and include experts with multidisciplinary skills. You can find all of the terms and conditions for participation here.

Some of the more than 30 problems that the start-ups will aim to resolve include designing and implementing an intelligent monitoring system for the electrical power system at the Port of Gdynia; intelligent surveillance of safe navigation in the inner harbour of the Port of Gdansk; and an IT system allowing the handling of wheeled vehicle transport for OT Logistics, among others. The full list of problems to be solved is available on the website.

In the second call, the programme has money to support 13 start-ups. Initially, at least 18 will be invited to take part in the programme and, after the first month of the acceleration phase a decision will be made on which teams can advance further. The selected projects will work for three months to develop their business, after which they will have an opportunity to pitch their ideas and attract investors to develop their business further.

For more information, check out the programme’s website.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Space3ac gives start-ups working with EO, GNSS and integrated applications access to international mentors and investors and the opportunity to develop their business.

Last chance to start your Space3ac adventure and apply for financial support

30.10.2017 11:41  
Published: 
30 October 2017

The latest recruitment drive for Space3ac, a three-month acceleration programme for start-ups using satellite technologies to create solutions for the intermodal transportation, oil and gas and insurance sectors, is set to end at midnight on Friday, November 3. Interested start-ups with capabilities to solve problems provided by industry partners should “raise their hands” and register (by filling out a short form) on the programme’s website. The recruitment process will continue with interviews and meetings on 20-21 November.

The Space3ac programme aims to solve problems experienced by transportation, oil and gas and insurance industry stakeholders by connecting them to start-ups with new ideas based on Earth observation, GNSS, telecommunications or integrated applications. In addition to PLN 200 000 (EUR 47,000) in cash, the start-ups will receive access to over 40 international technical and business mentors, be given a place to develop their business ideas, and be introduced to investors from all over the world.

Basic space industry knowledge required

The programme is looking for teams that have an early prototype or minimum viable product (MVP) of their solution, with a technology readiness level of at least 2. The teams should also have at least basic knowledge of the space industry and downstream sector and include experts with multidisciplinary skills. You can find all of the terms and conditions for participation here.

Some of the more than 30 problems that the start-ups will aim to resolve include designing and implementing an intelligent monitoring system for the electrical power system at the Port of Gdynia; intelligent surveillance of safe navigation in the inner harbour of the Port of Gdansk; and an IT system allowing the handling of wheeled vehicle transport for OT Logistics, among others. The full list of problems to be solved is available on the website.

In the second call, the programme has money to support 13 start-ups. Initially, at least 18 will be invited to take part in the programme and, after the first month of the acceleration phase a decision will be made on which teams can advance further. The selected projects will work for three months to develop their business, after which they will have an opportunity to pitch their ideas and attract investors to develop their business further.

For more information, check out the programme’s website.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Space3ac gives start-ups working with EO, GNSS and integrated applications access to international mentors and investors and the opportunity to develop their business.

Last chance to start your Space3ac adventure and apply for financial support

30.10.2017 11:41  
Published: 
30 October 2017

The latest recruitment drive for Space3ac, a three-month acceleration programme for start-ups using satellite technologies to create solutions for the intermodal transportation, oil and gas and insurance sectors, is set to end at midnight on Tuesday, October 31. Interested start-ups with capabilities to solve problems provided by industry partners should “raise their hands” and register (by filling out a short form) on the programme’s website. The recruitment process will continue with interviews and meetings on 20-21 November.

The Space3ac programme aims to solve problems experienced by transportation, oil and gas and insurance industry stakeholders by connecting them to start-ups with new ideas based on Earth observation, GNSS, telecommunications or integrated applications. In addition to PLN 200 000 (EUR 47,000) in cash, the start-ups will receive access to over 40 international technical and business mentors, be given a place to develop their business ideas, and be introduced to investors from all over the world.

Basic space industry knowledge required

The programme is looking for teams that have an early prototype or minimum viable product (MVP) of their solution, with a technology readiness level of at least 2. The teams should also have at least basic knowledge of the space industry and downstream sector and include experts with multidisciplinary skills. You can find all of the terms and conditions for participation here.

Some of the more than 30 problems that the start-ups will aim to resolve include designing and implementing an intelligent monitoring system for the electrical power system at the Port of Gdynia; intelligent surveillance of safe navigation in the inner harbour of the Port of Gdansk; and an IT system allowing the handling of wheeled vehicle transport for OT Logistics, among others. The full list of problems to be solved is available on the website.

In the second call, the programme has money to support 13 start-ups. Initially, at least 18 will be invited to take part in the programme and, after the first month of the acceleration phase a decision will be made on which teams can advance further. The selected projects will work for three months to develop their business, after which they will have an opportunity to pitch their ideas and attract investors to develop their business further.

For more information, check out the programme’s website.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Space3ac gives start-ups working with EO, GNSS and integrated applications access to international mentors and investors and the opportunity to develop their business.

GNSS raw measurements set to be a game changer

25.10.2017 13:47  
Published: 
25 October 2017

Are GNSS raw measurements in consumer devices just a playground for scientists, or do they represent a real market opportunity? This was the question posed by the GSA’s Raw Measurements Task Force at a panel discussion on the topic held 28 September at ION GNSS+ in Portland, Oregon (USA). 

With a smartphone featuring Android 7.0 (i.e., Nougat), users now have access to raw GNSS measurements – opening the door to higher-accuracy and the development of algorithms once restricted to more advanced GNSS receivers. This new capability also allows users to fully benefit from the special features offered by Galileo and to efficiently combine these features with other constellations. 

According to Google’s Frank van Diggelen, the first beneficiaries are the phone manufacturers: using the raw measurements with analysis tools provided by Google, the manufacturers can analyse GNSS performance in new phone designs. “GNSS raw measurements also create new opportunities for developers and users,” he said during his opening remarks. “The challenge is to innovate using raw measurements and not simply repeating position velocity and time calculation already done at the GNSS chip.” Along this line, he noted that Google is set to rollout a range of new tools with the specific purpose of using raw measurements for easier and more powerful data analysis.

Raw Measurements Task Force takes the reins

Although the availability of raw measurements was eagerly anticipated by the GNSS community, their use has remained limited to testing by GNSS experts. To help get a better understanding of this feature’s true potential and to promote its use to application developers, the GSA established the Raw Measurements Task Force.

“The purpose of the task force is to explore the real business opportunities of having access to GNSS raw measurements,” said NSL General Manager and Task Force member Mark Dumville. “It is open to all interested parties who share our goal of supporting both the GNSS and developer communities in using raw measurements for innovative commercial and societal applications.”

The Task Force is currently working on a White Paper explaining how GNSS raw measurements can be used to optimise the calculation of position, how they can be best corrected, and how they can create opportunities for innovative applications.

“It is our intent that this White Paper will be the de facto international reference for accessing and using raw measurements,” added Dumville. “The paper’s contents will include information on how to use the measurements, best practices, case studies and early examples of applications benefiting from processing raw measurements on Android devices.”

The White Paper, which is currently in draft form, will also provide an outlook on the future use of raw measurements.  

Successful testing

In addition to its theoretical work, the Task Force is also busy performing tests on the mobile hardware that is already enabled for processing raw measurements. The purpose of these tests is to assess both current and future performance of the raw measurements. “Initial results are encouraging, as performance in optimal environments can achieve metre-level accuracy using different techniques,” explained the University of Nottingham’s Lukasz Bonenberg, who is also a Task Force member. 

According to Bonenberg, realistic scenario testing has identified two key limitations: linearly polarised antenna and duty cycles on GNSS chipsets, both of which limit the use of carrier phase observations – a requirement for achieving sub-metre accuracy. However, he assured the panel that solutions are possible. Bonenberg also confirmed that those devices capable of using raw measurements should be able to take advantage of the additional layer of integrity and robustness that the measurements provide.

That being said, Bonenberg doesn’t see positioning enhancement as being the most important raw measurement application. “An extra layer of security, jamming detection or crowdsourcing are just some of the out-of-the-box solutions that are now possible thanks to raw measurements,” he said. “Developers should not try to beat chipset manufacturers at accuracy, but instead focus on using existing knowledge to introduce new and more flexible solutions and services.”

Opportunity for Galileo

To demonstrate the role of Galileo within the use of GNSS raw measurements, Astrium’s Moises Navarro pointed to a recent experiment involving two PVT solutions. Although both solutions were based on raw measurements coming from a smartphone, only one included Galileo measurements. “Thanks to the raw measurements, users can select which constellations the PVT uses and which satellites are filtered out,” he explained to the panel. “However, by opting to include Galileo in the PVT solution through the raw measurements, users can easily experience the added accuracy and availability it provides.” 

Moises also explained how raw measurements enables other GNSS differentiators. “For example, Galileo’s Open Service Authentication is a unique feature not found in other GNSS constellations,” he added. “Since this navigation message is included in raw measurements, developers can use this feature to authenticate navigation messages.”   

Playground or Market Opportunity?

“Clearly, raw measurements have the potential to unlock new GNSS innovations,” concluded GSA Deputy Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani, who moderated the workshop. “More so, Galileo has much to offer, including the E5 second frequency and the Open Service Authentication – both of which will be game-changers for autonomous applications and location-based applications.”

So, the question remains: are raw measurements simply a playground for scientists or do they in fact represent a real market opportunity? According to those at the ION GNSS+ panel discussion, there isn’t any doubt that the answer is clearly the latter.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GSA led a panel discussion on the market potential of GNSS raw measurements at last month’s ION GNSS+ in Portland, Oregon (USA).

GNSS raw measurements set to be a game changer

25.10.2017 13:47  
Published: 
25 October 2017

Are GNSS raw measurements in consumer devices just a playground for scientists, or do they represent a real market opportunity? This was the question posed by the GSA’s Raw Measurements Task Force at a panel discussion on the topic held 28 September at ION GNSS+ in Portland, Oregon (USA). 

With a smartphone featuring Android 7.0 (i.e., Nougat), users now have access to raw GNSS measurements – opening the door to higher-accuracy and the development of algorithms once restricted to more advanced GNSS receivers. This new capability also allows users to fully benefit from the special features offered by Galileo and to efficiently combine these features with other constellations. 

According to Google’s Frank van Diggelen, the first beneficiaries are the phone manufacturers: using the raw measurements with analysis tools provided by Google, the manufacturers can analyse GNSS performance in new phone designs. “GNSS raw measurements also create new opportunities for developers and users,” he said during his opening remarks. “The challenge is to innovate using raw measurements and not simply repeating position velocity and time calculation already done at the GNSS chip.” Along this line, he noted that Google is set to rollout a range of new tools with the specific purpose of using raw measurements for easier and more powerful data analysis.

Raw Measurements Task Force takes the reins

Although the availability of raw measurements was eagerly anticipated by the GNSS community, their use has remained limited to testing by GNSS experts. To help get a better understanding of this feature’s true potential and to promote its use to application developers, the GSA established the Raw Measurements Task Force.

“The purpose of the task force is to explore the real business opportunities of having access to GNSS raw measurements,” said NSL General Manager and Task Force member Mark Dumville. “It is open to all interested parties who share our goal of supporting both the GNSS and developer communities in using raw measurements for innovative commercial and societal applications.”

The Task Force is currently working on a White Paper explaining how GNSS raw measurements can be used to optimise the calculation of position, how they can be best corrected, and how they can create opportunities for innovative applications.

“It is our intent that this White Paper will be the de facto international reference for accessing and using raw measurements,” added Dumville. “The paper’s contents will include information on how to use the measurements, best practices, case studies and early examples of applications benefiting from processing raw measurements on Android devices.”

The White Paper, which is currently in draft form, will also provide an outlook on the future use of raw measurements.  

Successful testing

In addition to its theoretical work, the Task Force is also busy performing tests on the mobile hardware that is already enabled for processing raw measurements. The purpose of these tests is to assess both current and future performance of the raw measurements. “Initial results are encouraging, as performance in optimal environments can achieve metre-level accuracy using different techniques,” explained the University of Nottingham’s Lukasz Bonenberg, who is also a Task Force member. 

According to Bonenberg, realistic scenario testing has identified two key limitations: linearly polarised antenna and duty cycles on GNSS chipsets, both of which limit the use of carrier phase observations – a requirement for achieving sub-metre accuracy. However, he assured the panel that solutions are possible. Bonenberg also confirmed that those devices capable of using raw measurements should be able to take advantage of the additional layer of integrity and robustness that the measurements provide.

That being said, Bonenberg doesn’t see positioning enhancement as being the most important raw measurement application. “An extra layer of security, jamming detection or crowdsourcing are just some of the out-of-the-box solutions that are now possible thanks to raw measurements,” he said. “Developers should not try to beat chipset manufacturers at accuracy, but instead focus on using existing knowledge to introduce new and more flexible solutions and services.”

Opportunity for Galileo

To demonstrate the role of Galileo within the use of GNSS raw measurements, Astrium’s Moises Navarro pointed to a recent experiment involving two PVT solutions. Although both solutions were based on raw measurements coming from a smartphone, only one included Galileo measurements. “Thanks to the raw measurements, users can select which constellations the PVT uses and which satellites are filtered out,” he explained to the panel. “However, by opting to include Galileo in the PVT solution through the raw measurements, users can easily experience the added accuracy and availability it provides.” 

Moises also explained how raw measurements enables other GNSS differentiators. “For example, Galileo’s Open Service Authentication is a unique feature not found in other GNSS constellations,” he added. “Since this navigation message is included in raw measurements, developers can use this feature to authenticate navigation messages.”   

Playground or Market Opportunity?

“Clearly, raw measurements have the potential to unlock new GNSS innovations,” concluded GSA Deputy Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani, who moderated the workshop. “More so, Galileo has much to offer, including the E5 second frequency and the Open Service Authentication – both of which will be game-changers for autonomous applications and location-based applications.”

So, the question remains: are raw measurements simply a playground for scientists or do they in fact represent a real market opportunity? According to those at the ION GNSS+ panel discussion, there isn’t any doubt that the answer is clearly the latter.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GSA led a panel discussion on the market potential of GNSS raw measurements at last month’s ION GNSS+ in Portland, Oregon (USA).

GNSS raw measurements set to be a game changer

25.10.2017 13:47  
Published: 
25 October 2017

Are GNSS raw measurements in consumer devices just a playground for scientists, or do they represent a real market opportunity? This was the question posed by the GSA’s Raw Measurements Task Force at a panel discussion on the topic held 28 September at ION GNSS+ in Portland, Oregon (USA). 

With a smartphone featuring Android 7.0 (i.e., Nougat), users now have access to raw GNSS measurements – opening the door to higher-accuracy and the development of algorithms once restricted to more advanced GNSS receivers. This new capability also allows users to fully benefit from the special features offered by Galileo and to efficiently combine these features with other constellations. 

According to Google’s Frank van Diggelen, the first beneficiaries are the phone manufacturers: using the raw measurements with analysis tools provided by Google, the manufacturers can analyse GNSS performance in new phone designs. “GNSS raw measurements also create new opportunities for developers and users,” he said during his opening remarks. “The challenge is to innovate using raw measurements and not simply repeating position velocity and time calculation already done at the GNSS chip.” Along this line, he noted that Google is set to rollout a range of new tools with the specific purpose of using raw measurements for easier and more powerful data analysis.

Raw Measurements Task Force takes the reins

Although the availability of raw measurements was eagerly anticipated by the GNSS community, their use has remained limited to testing by GNSS experts. To help get a better understanding of this feature’s true potential and to promote its use to application developers, the GSA established the Raw Measurements Task Force.

“The purpose of the task force is to explore the real business opportunities of having access to GNSS raw measurements,” said NSL General Manager and Task Force member Mark Dumville. “It is open to all interested parties who share our goal of supporting both the GNSS and developer communities in using raw measurements for innovative commercial and societal applications.”

The Task Force is currently working on a White Paper explaining how GNSS raw measurements can be used to optimise the calculation of position, how they can be best corrected, and how they can create opportunities for innovative applications.

“It is our intent that this White Paper will be the de facto international reference for accessing and using raw measurements,” added Dumville. “The paper’s contents will include information on how to use the measurements, best practices, case studies and early examples of applications benefiting from processing raw measurements on Android devices.”

The White Paper, which is currently in draft form, will also provide an outlook on the future use of raw measurements.  

Successful testing

In addition to its theoretical work, the Task Force is also busy performing tests on the mobile hardware that is already enabled for processing raw measurements. The purpose of these tests is to assess both current and future performance of the raw measurements. “Initial results are encouraging, as performance in optimal environments can achieve metre-level accuracy using different techniques,” explained the University of Nottingham’s Lukasz Bonenberg, who is also a Task Force member. 

According to Bonenberg, realistic scenario testing has identified two key limitations: linearly polarised antenna and duty cycles on GNSS chipsets, both of which limit the use of carrier phase observations – a requirement for achieving sub-metre accuracy. However, he assured the panel that solutions are possible. Bonenberg also confirmed that those devices capable of using raw measurements should be able to take advantage of the additional layer of integrity and robustness that the measurements provide.

That being said, Bonenberg doesn’t see positioning enhancement as being the most important raw measurement application. “An extra layer of security, jamming detection or crowdsourcing are just some of the out-of-the-box solutions that are now possible thanks to raw measurements,” he said. “Developers should not try to beat chipset manufacturers at accuracy, but instead focus on using existing knowledge to introduce new and more flexible solutions and services.”

Opportunity for Galileo

To demonstrate the role of Galileo within the use of GNSS raw measurements, Astrium’s Moises Navarro pointed to a recent experiment involving two PVT solutions. Although both solutions were based on raw measurements coming from a smartphone, only one included Galileo measurements. “Thanks to the raw measurements, users can select which constellations the PVT uses and which satellites are filtered out,” he explained to the panel. “However, by opting to include Galileo in the PVT solution through the raw measurements, users can easily experience the added accuracy and availability it provides.” 

Moises also explained how raw measurements enables other GNSS differentiators. “For example, Galileo’s Open Service Authentication is a unique feature not found in other GNSS constellations,” he added. “Since this navigation message is included in raw measurements, developers can use this feature to authenticate navigation messages.”   

Playground or Market Opportunity?

“Clearly, raw measurements have the potential to unlock new GNSS innovations,” concluded GSA Deputy Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani, who moderated the workshop. “More so, Galileo has much to offer, including the E5 second frequency and the Open Service Authentication – both of which will be game-changers for autonomous applications and location-based applications.”

So, the question remains: are raw measurements simply a playground for scientists or do they in fact represent a real market opportunity? According to those at the ION GNSS+ panel discussion, there isn’t any doubt that the answer is clearly the latter.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GSA led a panel discussion on the market potential of GNSS raw measurements at last month’s ION GNSS+ in Portland, Oregon (USA).

GNSS raw measurements set to be a game changer

25.10.2017 13:47  
Published: 
25 October 2017

Are GNSS raw measurements in consumer devices just a playground for scientists, or do they represent a real market opportunity? This was the question posed by the GSA’s Raw Measurements Task Force at a panel discussion on the topic held 28 September at ION GNSS+ in Portland, Oregon (USA). 

With a smartphone featuring Android 7.0 (i.e., Nougat), users now have access to raw GNSS measurements – opening the door to higher-accuracy and the development of algorithms once restricted to more advanced GNSS receivers. This new capability also allows users to fully benefit from the special features offered by Galileo and to efficiently combine these features with other constellations. 

According to Google’s Frank van Diggelen, the first beneficiaries are the phone manufacturers: using the raw measurements with analysis tools provided by Google, the manufacturers can analyse GNSS performance in new phone designs. “GNSS raw measurements also create new opportunities for developers and users,” he said during his opening remarks. “The challenge is to innovate using raw measurements and not simply repeating position velocity and time calculation already done at the GNSS chip.” Along this line, he noted that Google is set to rollout a range of new tools with the specific purpose of using raw measurements for easier and more powerful data analysis.

Raw Measurements Task Force takes the reins

Although the availability of raw measurements was eagerly anticipated by the GNSS community, their use has remained limited to testing by GNSS experts. To help get a better understanding of this feature’s true potential and to promote its use to application developers, the GSA established the Raw Measurements Task Force.

“The purpose of the task force is to explore the real business opportunities of having access to GNSS raw measurements,” said NSL General Manager and Task Force member Mark Dumville. “It is open to all interested parties who share our goal of supporting both the GNSS and developer communities in using raw measurements for innovative commercial and societal applications.”

The Task Force is currently working on a White Paper explaining how GNSS raw measurements can be used to optimise the calculation of position, how they can be best corrected, and how they can create opportunities for innovative applications.

“It is our intent that this White Paper will be the de facto international reference for accessing and using raw measurements,” added Dumville. “The paper’s contents will include information on how to use the measurements, best practices, case studies and early examples of applications benefiting from processing raw measurements on Android devices.”

The White Paper, which is currently in draft form, will also provide an outlook on the future use of raw measurements.  

Successful testing

In addition to its theoretical work, the Task Force is also busy performing tests on the mobile hardware that is already enabled for processing raw measurements. The purpose of these tests is to assess both current and future performance of the raw measurements. “Initial results are encouraging, as performance in optimal environments can achieve metre-level accuracy using different techniques,” explained the University of Nottingham’s Lukasz Bonenberg, who is also a Task Force member. 

According to Bonenberg, realistic scenario testing has identified two key limitations: linearly polarised antenna and duty cycles on GNSS chipsets, both of which limit the use of carrier phase observations – a requirement for achieving sub-metre accuracy. However, he assured the panel that solutions are possible. Bonenberg also confirmed that those devices capable of using raw measurements should be able to take advantage of the additional layer of integrity and robustness that the measurements provide.

That being said, Bonenberg doesn’t see positioning enhancement as being the most important raw measurement application. “An extra layer of security, jamming detection or crowdsourcing are just some of the out-of-the-box solutions that are now possible thanks to raw measurements,” he said. “Developers should not try to beat chipset manufacturers at accuracy, but instead focus on using existing knowledge to introduce new and more flexible solutions and services.”

Opportunity for Galileo

To demonstrate the role of Galileo within the use of GNSS raw measurements, Astrium’s Moises Navarro pointed to a recent experiment involving two PVT solutions. Although both solutions were based on raw measurements coming from a smartphone, only one included Galileo measurements. “Thanks to the raw measurements, users can select which constellations the PVT uses and which satellites are filtered out,” he explained to the panel. “However, by opting to include Galileo in the PVT solution through the raw measurements, users can easily experience the added accuracy and availability it provides.” 

Moises also explained how raw measurements enables other GNSS differentiators. “For example, Galileo’s Open Service Authentication is a unique feature not found in other GNSS constellations,” he added. “Since this navigation message is included in raw measurements, developers can use this feature to authenticate navigation messages.”   

Playground or Market Opportunity?

“Clearly, raw measurements have the potential to unlock new GNSS innovations,” concluded GSA Deputy Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani, who moderated the workshop. “More so, Galileo has much to offer, including the E5 second frequency and the Open Service Authentication – both of which will be game-changers for autonomous applications and location-based applications.”

So, the question remains: are raw measurements simply a playground for scientists or do they in fact represent a real market opportunity? According to those at the ION GNSS+ panel discussion, there isn’t any doubt that the answer is clearly the latter.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

“Clearly, raw measurements have the potential to unlock new GNSS innovations,” concluded GSA Deputy Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani, who moderated the workshop.

GNSS raw measurements set to be a game changer

25.10.2017 13:47  
Published: 
25 October 2017

Are GNSS raw measurements in consumer devices just a playground for scientists, or do they represent a real market opportunity? This was the question posed by the GSA’s Raw Measurements Task Force at a panel discussion on the topic held 28 September at ION GNSS+ in Portland, Oregon (USA). 

With a smartphone featuring Android 7.0 (i.e., Nougat), users now have access to raw GNSS measurements – opening the door to higher-accuracy and the development of algorithms once restricted to more advanced GNSS receivers. This new capability also allows users to fully benefit from the special features offered by Galileo and to efficiently combine these features with other constellations. 

According to Google’s Frank van Diggelen, the first beneficiaries are the phone manufacturers: using the raw measurements with analysis tools provided by Google, the manufacturers can analyse GNSS performance in new phone designs. “GNSS raw measurements also create new opportunities for developers and users,” he said during his opening remarks. “The challenge is to innovate using raw measurements and not simply repeating position velocity and time calculation already done at the GNSS chip.” Along this line, he noted that Google is set to rollout a range of new tools with the specific purpose of using raw measurements for easier and more powerful data analysis.

Raw Measurements Task Force takes the reins

Although the availability of raw measurements was eagerly anticipated by the GNSS community, their use has remained limited to testing by GNSS experts. To help get a better understanding of this feature’s true potential and to promote its use to application developers, the GSA established the Raw Measurements Task Force.

“The purpose of the task force is to explore the real business opportunities of having access to GNSS raw measurements,” said NSL General Manager and Task Force member Mark Dumville. “It is open to all interested parties who share our goal of supporting both the GNSS and developer communities in using raw measurements for innovative commercial and societal applications.”

The Task Force is currently working on a White Paper explaining how GNSS raw measurements can be used to optimise the calculation of position, how they can be best corrected, and how they can create opportunities for innovative applications.

“It is our intent that this White Paper will be the de facto international reference for accessing and using raw measurements,” added Dumville. “The paper’s contents will include information on how to use the measurements, best practices, case studies and early examples of applications benefiting from processing raw measurements on Android devices.”

The White Paper, which is currently in draft form, will also provide an outlook on the future use of raw measurements.  

Successful testing

In addition to its theoretical work, the Task Force is also busy performing tests on the mobile hardware that is already enabled for processing raw measurements. The purpose of these tests is to assess both current and future performance of the raw measurements. “Initial results are encouraging, as performance in optimal environments can achieve metre-level accuracy using different techniques,” explained the University of Nottingham’s Lukasz Bonenberg, who is also a Task Force member. 

According to Bonenberg, realistic scenario testing has identified two key limitations: linearly polarised antenna and duty cycles on GNSS chipsets, both of which limit the use of carrier phase observations – a requirement for achieving sub-metre accuracy. However, he assured the panel that solutions are possible. Bonenberg also confirmed that those devices capable of using raw measurements should be able to take advantage of the additional layer of integrity and robustness that the measurements provide.

That being said, Bonenberg doesn’t see positioning enhancement as being the most important raw measurement application. “An extra layer of security, jamming detection or crowdsourcing are just some of the out-of-the-box solutions that are now possible thanks to raw measurements,” he said. “Developers should not try to beat chipset manufacturers at accuracy, but instead focus on using existing knowledge to introduce new and more flexible solutions and services.”

Opportunity for Galileo

To demonstrate the role of Galileo within the use of GNSS raw measurements, Astrium’s Moises Navarro pointed to a recent experiment involving two PVT solutions. Although both solutions were based on raw measurements coming from a smartphone, only one included Galileo measurements. “Thanks to the raw measurements, users can select which constellations the PVT uses and which satellites are filtered out,” he explained to the panel. “However, by opting to include Galileo in the PVT solution through the raw measurements, users can easily experience the added accuracy and availability it provides.” 

Moises also explained how raw measurements enables other GNSS differentiators. “For example, Galileo’s Open Service Authentication is a unique feature not found in other GNSS constellations,” he added. “Since this navigation message is included in raw measurements, developers can use this feature to authenticate navigation messages.”   

Playground or Market Opportunity?

“Clearly, raw measurements have the potential to unlock new GNSS innovations,” concluded GSA Deputy Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani, who moderated the workshop. “More so, Galileo has much to offer, including the E5 second frequency and the Open Service Authentication – both of which will be game-changers for autonomous applications and location-based applications.”

So, the question remains: are raw measurements simply a playground for scientists or do they in fact represent a real market opportunity? According to those at the ION GNSS+ panel discussion, there isn’t any doubt that the answer is clearly the latter.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

“Clearly, raw measurements have the potential to unlock new GNSS innovations,” concluded GSA Deputy Head of Market Development Fiammetta Diani, who moderated the workshop.

GNSS at the centre of a revolution in agriculture

24.10.2017 10:10  
Published: 
24 October 2017

The agriculture sector has gone through a series of evolutionary milestones, from mechanisation, through the green revolution, to precision farming. The current revolution in the agriculture sector is digital farming, in which information about weather, soil conditions and crop health is combined with network technology to allow farmers to optimise their systems and improve their productivity. In Europe, EGNSS (Galileo and EGNOS) is a key enabling technology underpinning this revolution.

Digital farming, which was the central topic of the recent CEMA Farming 4.0 Summit in Brussels, describes the evolution of agriculture to become an inter-connected, knowledge-based production system that incorporates GNSS-enabled precision farming with intelligent networks and data management tools.

The use of digital technology incorporated in modern farm equipment is opening up new business models and opportunities in the agricultural sector, providing farmers with an unprecedented level of knowledge about their crops, livestock and operations and making the sector more efficient and environmentally sustainable.

Farmers quick to adopt EGNOS

In his presentation at the summit, the theme of which was ‘Moving towards connected & sustainable agriculture in Europe’, GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides said that the agriculture sector had been one of the first to make use of GNSS technology and that currently 80% of automated tractors were EGNOS-enabled.

He noted that the agricultural sector had gone through a series of evolutionary milestones, the most recent of which – precision farming and digital farming – are reliant on the guidance and monitoring capabilities offered by satellite technology: EGNSS and Copernicus. A recent milestone for Galileo – the market entry of a dual-frequency chipset - means that it is now even better placed to support the optimisation of farming operations.

In September this year, the chipset manufacturer Broadcom announced the entry to market of a dual-frequency chip. Dual-frequency chipsets and receivers benefit from better accuracy, ionosphere error cancellation, and faster transition from code tracking to phase tracking, among other benefits.

Galileo currently has more satellites operating in dual frequency than GPS. It also has a number of other features that can benefit the agriculture sector. “On the Open Signal, which can already be used by farmers, with single frequency Galileo was able to offer accuracy of 2.5 metres on the horizontal plane. However, with dual-frequency – as it does with EGNOS - the level of accuracy increases to sub-metre precision or 20-30 centimetres path-to-path,” des Dorides said. This level of navigational accuracy, combined with the Earth observation capabilities of Copernicus, supports real-time data analysis and in-field and inter-field optimisation in the agricultural sector, helping farmers to increase the productivity and sustainability of their operations. All of this will be complemented by a Galileo High Accuracy service by 2020, with FOC increasing the precision even more.

Watch this: EGNOS in Agriculture

Providing the viewpoint from farm equipment manufacturers, Thomas Böck, Chief Technology Officer at CLAAS, noted the importance of working with the GSA and with Galileo. He said that that there were a lot of opportunities for the industry and also for farmers themselves, in terms of increased profitability and sustainability, to be gained from this cooperation.

Matthew Foster, Vice President for Agricultural Commercial Development at CNH Industrial, noted that take-up of auto-guidance systems by farmers had been high and that the next step would be to achieve the connectivity needed to reap the benefits from all the data currently being produced.  For this to happen, and to ensure that farmers continue to adopt digital technologies, it will be necessary to have a Common Agricultural Policy that facilitates investment in precision farming.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

GNSS technology supports the farm of the future, helping boost the environmental sustainability and economic competitiveness of the agriculture sector

GNSS at the centre of a revolution in agriculture

24.10.2017 10:10  
Published: 
24 October 2017

The agriculture sector has gone through a series of evolutionary milestones, from mechanisation, through the green revolution, to precision farming. The current revolution in the agriculture sector is digital farming, in which information about weather, soil conditions and crop health is combined with network technology to allow farmers to optimise their systems and improve their productivity. In Europe, EGNSS (Galileo and EGNOS) is a key enabling technology underpinning this revolution.

Digital farming, which was the central topic of the recent CEMA Farming 4.0 Summit in Brussels, describes the evolution of agriculture to become an inter-connected, knowledge-based production system that incorporates GNSS-enabled precision farming with intelligent networks and data management tools.

The use of digital technology incorporated in modern farm equipment is opening up new business models and opportunities in the agricultural sector, providing farmers with an unprecedented level of knowledge about their crops, livestock and operations and making the sector more efficient and environmentally sustainable.

Farmers quick to adopt EGNOS

In his presentation at the summit, the theme of which was ‘Moving towards connected & sustainable agriculture in Europe’, GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides said that the agriculture sector had been one of the first to make use of GNSS technology and that currently 80% of automated tractors were EGNOS-enabled.

He noted that the agricultural sector had gone through a series of evolutionary milestones, the most recent of which – precision farming and digital farming – are reliant on the guidance and monitoring capabilities offered by satellite technology: EGNSS and Copernicus. A recent milestone for Galileo – the market entry of a dual-frequency chipset - means that it is now even better placed to support the optimisation of farming operations.

In September this year, the chipset manufacturer Broadcom announced the entry to market of a dual-frequency chip. Dual-frequency chipsets and receivers benefit from better accuracy, ionosphere error cancellation, and faster transition from code tracking to phase tracking, among other benefits.

Galileo currently has more satellites operating in dual frequency than GPS. It also has a number of other features that can benefit the agriculture sector. “On the Open Signal, which can already be used by farmers, with single frequency Galileo was able to offer accuracy of 2.5 metres on the horizontal plane. However, with dual-frequency – as it does with EGNOS - the level of accuracy increases to sub-metre precision or 20-30 centimetres path-to-path,” des Dorides said. This level of navigational accuracy, combined with the Earth observation capabilities of Copernicus, supports real-time data analysis and in-field and inter-field optimisation in the agricultural sector, helping farmers to increase the productivity and sustainability of their operations. All of this will be complemented by a Galileo High Accuracy service by 2020, with FOC increasing the precision even more.

Watch this: EGNOS in Agriculture

Providing the viewpoint from farm equipment manufacturers, Thomas Böck, Chief Technology Officer at CLAAS, noted the importance of working with the GSA and with Galileo. He said that that there were a lot of opportunities for the industry and also for farmers themselves, in terms of increased profitability and sustainability, to be gained from this cooperation.

Matthew Foster, Vice President for Agricultural Commercial Development at CNH Industrial, noted that take-up of auto-guidance systems by farmers had been high and that the next step would be to achieve the connectivity needed to reap the benefits from all the data currently being produced.  For this to happen, and to ensure that farmers continue to adopt digital technologies, it will be necessary to have a Common Agricultural Policy that facilitates investment in precision farming.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

GNSS technology supports the farm of the future, helping boost the environmental sustainability and economic competitiveness of the agriculture sector

GNSS at the centre of a revolution in agriculture

24.10.2017 10:10  
Published: 
24 October 2017

The agriculture sector has gone through a series of evolutionary milestones, from mechanisation, through the green revolution, to precision farming. The current revolution in the agriculture sector is digital farming, in which information about weather, soil conditions and crop health is combined with network technology to allow farmers to optimise their systems and improve their productivity. In Europe, EGNSS (Galileo and EGNOS) is a key enabling technology underpinning this revolution.

Digital farming, which was the central topic of the recent CEMA Farming 4.0 Summit in Brussels, describes the evolution of agriculture to become an inter-connected, knowledge-based production system that incorporates GNSS-enabled precision farming with intelligent networks and data management tools.

The use of digital technology incorporated in modern farm equipment is opening up new business models and opportunities in the agricultural sector, providing farmers with an unprecedented level of knowledge about their crops, livestock and operations and making the sector more efficient and environmentally sustainable.

Farmers quick to adopt EGNOS

In his presentation at the summit, the theme of which was ‘Moving towards connected & sustainable agriculture in Europe’, GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides said that the agriculture sector had been one of the first to make use of GNSS technology and that currently 80% of automated tractors were EGNOS-enabled.

He noted that the agricultural sector had gone through a series of evolutionary milestones, the most recent of which – precision farming and digital farming – are reliant on the guidance and monitoring capabilities offered by satellite technology: EGNSS and Copernicus. A recent milestone for Galileo – the market entry of a dual-frequency chipset - means that it is now even better placed to support the optimisation of farming operations.

In September this year, the chipset manufacturer Broadcom announced the entry to market of a dual-frequency chip. Dual-frequency chipsets and receivers benefit from better accuracy, ionosphere error cancellation, and faster transition from code tracking to phase tracking, among other benefits.

Galileo currently has more satellites operating in dual frequency than GPS. It also has a number of other features that can benefit the agriculture sector. “On the Open Signal, which can already be used by farmers, with single frequency Galileo was able to offer accuracy of 2.5 metres on the horizontal plane. However, with dual-frequency – as it does with EGNOS - the level of accuracy increases to sub-metre precision or 20-30 centimetres path-to-path,” des Dorides said. This level of navigational accuracy, combined with the Earth observation capabilities of Copernicus, supports real-time data analysis and in-field and inter-field optimisation in the agricultural sector, helping farmers to increase the productivity and sustainability of their operations. All of this will be complemented by a Galileo High Accuracy service by 2020, with FOC increasing the precision even more.

Watch this: EGNOS in Agriculture

Providing the viewpoint from farm equipment manufacturers, Thomas Böck, Chief Technology Officer at CLAAS, noted the importance of working with the GSA and with Galileo. He said that that there were a lot of opportunities for the industry and also for farmers themselves, in terms of increased profitability and sustainability, to be gained from this cooperation.

Matthew Foster, Vice President for Agricultural Commercial Development at CNH Industrial, noted that take-up of auto-guidance systems by farmers had been high and that the next step would be to achieve the connectivity needed to reap the benefits from all the data currently being produced.  For this to happen, and to ensure that farmers continue to adopt digital technologies, it will be necessary to have a Common Agricultural Policy that facilitates investment in precision farming.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

GNSS technology supports the farm of the future, helping boost the environmental sustainability and economic competitiveness of the agriculture sector

Galileo and Copernicus combine forces at InterGEO 2017

20.10.2017 9:32  
Published: 
20 October 2017

Europe's flagship space programmes, Galileo and Copernicus, shared a stand and a stage at this year's InterGEO event in Berlin.

For the European GNSS Agency (GSA) and the European Commission, the aim of this year's joint appearance by Galileo and Copernicus at InterGEO 2017 was to highlight the powerful synergies that exist between the two services.

"This is the first time we have shared a common stand at an event of this type," said GSA Market Development Officer Reinhard Blasi. "We in the GNSS community know a lot about Galileo already, but we may not know so much about Copernicus. This is Europe's earth observation and monitoring programme, which, like Galileo, delivers openly and freely in a wide range of application areas, with both operational data and information services."

Blasi was speaking at the world's premier event for the geospatial industry, and the joint use of E-GNSS and Earth observation data certainly enables a number of applications of great interest to the mapping and surveying communities that gather at InterGEO. But there are also large numbers of potential value-added applications for the agriculture sector, for smart cities, road transport, maritime navigation, emergency/crisis management, utilities and many others.

"These synergies exist in many market segments," Blasi said, "for example in biomass monitoring, hydrographical offshore surveying or border surveillance." He cited a specific example in the area of precision agriculture, where Copernicus can deliver very detailed information about soil humidity and composition, which can then be used to generate metre- and centimetre-level maps of soil parameters. Farmers can then overlay Galileo- and EGNOS-generated location maps to guide targeted irrigation and other operations in their fields.

In the area of environmental management, Copernicus delivers key information on the state of forests, water quality and snow cover, while again Galileo and EGNOS provide precise guidance to specific areas of interest.

Many applications

The European Union is supporting a major initiative in the area of Smart Cities. Here, Copernicus can be of great use in the monitoring of urban growth, green areas, and land use, both legal and illegal, while European GNSS can be combined with this kind of information to help better understand the mobility habits of urban citizens.

"For public authorities, combined Earth observation and GNSS information is really very valuable," said Blasi, "for urban planning, defining new urban corridors and infrastructure projects and supporting law enforcement. And all of these are just a few of the areas where Galileo and Copernicus can work together to provide something that is more powerful than either one by itself."

At the joint Galileo/Copernicus stand in the InterGEo exhibition area, representatives from the German Aerospace Centre (DLR), including Alexandra Förster and Lena Schultz-Lieckfeld, as well as the GSA's Blasi, and Julia Ioannou of the Copernicus Support Office, provided more insights into what can be accomplished by combining Copernicus and Galileo data.

There was also an array of representatives on hand from small and medium-sized companies that have been involved in Galileo initiatives, all ready to meet visitors and answer questions. For everyone involved in the two programmes, the experience of coming together and presenting, for the first time, a united front in a very large public forum, appeared to be productive and ultimately very rewarding.

Blasi said that in the future the two programmes would be more likely to work together in this way. "Galileo and Copernicus really do complement each other," he said, "so it makes sense for us, the people who work on these programmes, to come together like this, to tell our stories and promote our work, which is really of great benefit to the public and industry."

More good news for European GNSS

GSA Market Development Innovation Officer Alina Hriscu also spoke at a special conference session at InterGEO, where she described in detail Galileo operational status as well as the state of play among GNSS receiver manufacturers and the wider GNSS market. She also expressed the Agency's great satisfaction with the recent launch by Broadcom of the world's first dual frequency GNSS receiver for smartphones.

Broadcom Limited is a worldwide semiconductor leader, and its new receiver, the BCM47755, will provide, among other things, lane-level accuracy with minimal power consumption and will help to enable a new range of high-precision LBS applications.

As the GSA has pointed out, Europe’s Galileo constellation is largely responsible for the expanded availability of L1/E1 and L5/E5 frequencies, making it possible to use both frequencies to compute position much more accurately.

Special Galileo student prize awarded

InterGEO 2017 was also the occasion to recognize the work of some outstanding young people, in the context of the CLGE Students Contest. Every year, the Council of European Geodetic Surveyors (CLGE) organises the contest aimed at rewarding research in various surveying-related areas.

This year, as it has in previous years, the GSA sponsored a special prize for entries that show a dedicated use of Galileo, EGNOS or Copernicus. The winner, announced at InterGEO, was Sander Varbla from the Tallinn University of Technology in Estonia.

Varbla's paper, entitled 'Assessment of marine geoid models by ship-borne GNSS profiles', presented the results of a 2016 marine gravity and GNSS campaign carried out on board the Estonian Maritime Administration survey vessel 'Jakob Prei' in the WestEstonian archipeligo.

The prize, awarded by the GSA's Hriscu, came with a check for 1000 euros. After receiving the award and thanking the GSA and contest organisers, Varbla said, "This means a lot to me. It means that my work is valued and it makes a difference, and I'm really looking forward to continuing with this kind of research."

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Joint use of E-GNSS and Earth observation data enables many applications of interest to the mapping and surveying communities.

Galileo and Copernicus combine forces at InterGEO 2017

20.10.2017 9:32  
Published: 
20 October 2017

Europe's flagship space programmes, Galileo and Copernicus, shared a stand and a stage at this year's InterGEO event in Berlin.

For the European GNSS Agency (GSA) and the European Commission, the aim of this year's joint appearance by Galileo and Copernicus at InterGEO 2017 was to highlight the powerful synergies that exist between the two services.

"This is the first time we have shared a common stand at an event of this type," said GSA Market Development Officer Reinhard Blasi. "We in the GNSS community know a lot about Galileo already, but we may not know so much about Copernicus. This is Europe's earth observation and monitoring programme, which, like Galileo, delivers openly and freely in a wide range of application areas, with both operational data and information services."

Blasi was speaking at the world's premier event for the geospatial industry, and the joint use of E-GNSS and Earth observation data certainly enables a number of applications of great interest to the mapping and surveying communities that gather at InterGEO. But there are also large numbers of potential value-added applications for the agriculture sector, for smart cities, road transport, maritime navigation, emergency/crisis management, utilities and many others.

"These synergies exist in many market segments," Blasi said, "for example in biomass monitoring, hydrographical offshore surveying or border surveillance." He cited a specific example in the area of precision agriculture, where Copernicus can deliver very detailed information about soil humidity and composition, which can then be used to generate metre- and centimetre-level maps of soil parameters. Farmers can then overlay Galileo- and EGNOS-generated location maps to guide targeted irrigation and other operations in their fields.

In the area of environmental management, Copernicus delivers key information on the state of forests, water quality and snow cover, while again Galileo and EGNOS provide precise guidance to specific areas of interest.

Many applications

The European Union is supporting a major initiative in the area of Smart Cities. Here, Copernicus can be of great use in the monitoring of urban growth, green areas, and land use, both legal and illegal, while European GNSS can be combined with this kind of information to help better understand the mobility habits of urban citizens.

"For public authorities, combined Earth observation and GNSS information is really very valuable," said Blasi, "for urban planning, defining new urban corridors and infrastructure projects and supporting law enforcement. And all of these are just a few of the areas where Galileo and Copernicus can work together to provide something that is more powerful than either one by itself."

At the joint Galileo/Copernicus stand in the InterGEo exhibition area, representatives from the German Aerospace Centre (DLR), including Alexandra Förster and Lena Schultz-Lieckfeld, as well as the GSA's Blasi, and Julia Ioannou of the Copernicus Support Office, provided more insights into what can be accomplished by combining Copernicus and Galileo data.

There was also an array of representatives on hand from small and medium-sized companies that have been involved in Galileo initiatives, all ready to meet visitors and answer questions. For everyone involved in the two programmes, the experience of coming together and presenting, for the first time, a united front in a very large public forum, appeared to be productive and ultimately very rewarding.

Blasi said that in the future the two programmes would be more likely to work together in this way. "Galileo and Copernicus really do complement each other," he said, "so it makes sense for us, the people who work on these programmes, to come together like this, to tell our stories and promote our work, which is really of great benefit to the public and industry."

More good news for European GNSS

GSA Market Development Innovation Officer Alina Hriscu also spoke at a special conference session at InterGEO, where she described in detail Galileo operational status as well as the state of play among GNSS receiver manufacturers and the wider GNSS market. She also expressed the Agency's great satisfaction with the recent launch by Broadcom of the world's first dual frequency GNSS receiver for smartphones.

Broadcom Limited is a worldwide semiconductor leader, and its new receiver, the BCM47755, will provide, among other things, lane-level accuracy with minimal power consumption and will help to enable a new range of high-precision LBS applications.

As the GSA has pointed out, Europe’s Galileo constellation is largely responsible for the expanded availability of L1/E1 and L5/E5 frequencies, making it possible to use both frequencies to compute position much more accurately.

Special Galileo student prize awarded

InterGEO 2017 was also the occasion to recognize the work of some outstanding young people, in the context of the CLGE Students Contest. Every year, the Council of European Geodetic Surveyors (CLGE) organises the contest aimed at rewarding research in various surveying-related areas.

This year, as it has in previous years, the GSA sponsored a special prize for entries that show a dedicated use of Galileo, EGNOS or Copernicus. The winner, announced at InterGEO, was Sander Varbla from the Tallinn University of Technology in Estonia.

Varbla's paper, entitled 'Assessment of marine geoid models by ship-borne GNSS profiles', presented the results of a 2016 marine gravity and GNSS campaign carried out on board the Estonian Maritime Administration survey vessel 'Jakob Prei' in the WestEstonian archipeligo.

The prize, awarded by the GSA's Hriscu, came with a check for 1000 euros. After receiving the award and thanking the GSA and contest organisers, Varbla said, "This means a lot to me. It means that my work is valued and it makes a difference, and I'm really looking forward to continuing with this kind of research."

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Joint use of E-GNSS and Earth observation data enables many applications of interest to the mapping and surveying communities.

Galileo and Copernicus combine forces at InterGEO 2017

20.10.2017 9:32  
Published: 
20 October 2017

Europe's flagship space programmes, Galileo and Copernicus, shared a stand and a stage at this year's InterGEO event in Berlin.

For the European GNSS Agency (GSA) and the European Commission, the aim of this year's joint appearance by Galileo and Copernicus at InterGEO 2017 was to highlight the powerful synergies that exist between the two services.

"This is the first time we have shared a common stand at an event of this type," said GSA Market Development Officer Reinhard Blasi. "We in the GNSS community know a lot about Galileo already, but we may not know so much about Copernicus. This is Europe's earth observation and monitoring programme, which, like Galileo, delivers openly and freely in a wide range of application areas, with both operational data and information services."

Blasi was speaking at the world's premier event for the geospatial industry, and the joint use of E-GNSS and Earth observation data certainly enables a number of applications of great interest to the mapping and surveying communities that gather at InterGEO. But there are also large numbers of potential value-added applications for the agriculture sector, for smart cities, road transport, maritime navigation, emergency/crisis management, utilities and many others.

"These synergies exist in many market segments," Blasi said, "for example in biomass monitoring, hydrographical offshore surveying or border surveillance." He cited a specific example in the area of precision agriculture, where Copernicus can deliver very detailed information about soil humidity and composition, which can then be used to generate metre- and centimetre-level maps of soil parameters. Farmers can then overlay Galileo- and EGNOS-generated location maps to guide targeted irrigation and other operations in their fields.

In the area of environmental management, Copernicus delivers key information on the state of forests, water quality and snow cover, while again Galileo and EGNOS provide precise guidance to specific areas of interest.

Many applications

The European Union is supporting a major initiative in the area of Smart Cities. Here, Copernicus can be of great use in the monitoring of urban growth, green areas, and land use, both legal and illegal, while European GNSS can be combined with this kind of information to help better understand the mobility habits of urban citizens.

"For public authorities, combined Earth observation and GNSS information is really very valuable," said Blasi, "for urban planning, defining new urban corridors and infrastructure projects and supporting law enforcement. And all of these are just a few of the areas where Galileo and Copernicus can work together to provide something that is more powerful than either one by itself."

At the joint Galileo/Copernicus stand in the InterGEo exhibition area, representatives from the German Aerospace Centre (DLR), including Alexandra Förster and Lena Schultz-Lieckfeld, as well as the GSA's Blasi, and Julia Ioannou of the Copernicus Support Office, provided more insights into what can be accomplished by combining Copernicus and Galileo data.

There was also an array of representatives on hand from small and medium-sized companies that have been involved in Galileo initiatives, all ready to meet visitors and answer questions. For everyone involved in the two programmes, the experience of coming together and presenting, for the first time, a united front in a very large public forum, appeared to be productive and ultimately very rewarding.

Blasi said that in the future the two programmes would be more likely to work together in this way. "Galileo and Copernicus really do complement each other," he said, "so it makes sense for us, the people who work on these programmes, to come together like this, to tell our stories and promote our work, which is really of great benefit to the public and industry."

More good news for European GNSS

GSA Market Development Innovation Officer Alina Hriscu also spoke at a special conference session at InterGEO, where she described in detail Galileo operational status as well as the state of play among GNSS receiver manufacturers and the wider GNSS market. She also expressed the Agency's great satisfaction with the recent launch by Broadcom of the world's first dual frequency GNSS receiver for smartphones.

Broadcom Limited is a worldwide semiconductor leader, and its new receiver, the BCM47755, will provide, among other things, lane-level accuracy with minimal power consumption and will help to enable a new range of high-precision LBS applications.

As the GSA has pointed out, Europe’s Galileo constellation is largely responsible for the expanded availability of L1/E1 and L5/E5 frequencies, making it possible to use both frequencies to compute position much more accurately.

Special Galileo student prize awarded

InterGEO 2017 was also the occasion to recognize the work of some outstanding young people, in the context of the CLGE Students Contest. Every year, the Council of European Geodetic Surveyors (CLGE) organises the contest aimed at rewarding research in various surveying-related areas.

This year, as it has in previous years, the GSA sponsored a special prize for entries that show a dedicated use of Galileo, EGNOS or Copernicus. The winner, announced at InterGEO, was Sander Varbla from the Tallinn University of Technology in Estonia.

Varbla's paper, entitled 'Assessment of marine geoid models by ship-borne GNSS profiles', presented the results of a 2016 marine gravity and GNSS campaign carried out on board the Estonian Maritime Administration survey vessel 'Jakob Prei' in the WestEstonian archipeligo.

The prize, awarded by the GSA's Hriscu, came with a check for 1000 euros. After receiving the award and thanking the GSA and contest organisers, Varbla said, "This means a lot to me. It means that my work is valued and it makes a difference, and I'm really looking forward to continuing with this kind of research."

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Joint use of E-GNSS and Earth observation data enables many applications of interest to the mapping and surveying communities.

Don’t miss the 1st Galileo User Assembly set for November 28-29

19.10.2017 15:32  
Published: 
20 October 2017

The 1st Galileo User Assembly is set to take place in Madrid on November 28-29. The event will provide Galileo and EGNOS users with the opportunity to discuss their needs, share their experience and provide feedback on EGNSS performance.

One year after the launch of Galileo Initial Services, in December 2016, EGNSS users will gather for the 1st Galileo User Assembly in Madrid this November. On the first day of the Assembly, Galileo and EGNOS users will participate in the first ever EGNSS User Consultation Platform (UCP), broken into four thematic groups - Transport, Mass Market, Professional and R&D. The participants in the thematic groups will then discuss their findings in a plenary session, to be held on the second day of the Assembly.

Improving service delivery

Participants in the event will be given a general update on the Galileo programme, along with presentations on Galileo Initial Services performance, the Galileo Services Roadmap and the Galileo User Interfaces. They will also have the opportunity to take part in the 2017 Galileo User Satisfaction Survey, through which the GSA aims to gain a better understanding of Galileo’s value to users, aiming at continuously improving service delivery. The User Consultation Platform will be covering both EGNOS and Galileo.

Watch this: Galileo Initial Services

The 1st Galileo User Assembly will be hosted by the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) at its premises in Madrid. The GSC provides an interface for the Galileo Open Service (OS), Commercial Service (CS) and Safety-of-Life (SoL) user communities, and participants in the Assembly will have the opportunity to tour the premises and to take part in a networking reception.

You can pre-register to attend the 1st Galileo User Assembly here. Places are limited, so filling out the form does not guarantee a place. You will receive a confirmation via email once your request is processed.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The 1st Galileo User Assembly will give users the chance to discuss their experience of using Galileo so far, and their needs for the future

Don’t miss the 1st Galileo User Assembly set for November 28-29

19.10.2017 15:32  

The 1st Galileo User Assembly is set to take place in Madrid on November 28-29. The event will provide Galileo and EGNOS users with the opportunity to discuss their needs, share their experience and provide feedback on EGNSS performance.

One year after the launch of Galileo Initial Services, in December 2016, EGNSS users will gather for the 1st Galileo User Assembly in Madrid this November. On the first day of the Assembly, Galileo and EGNOS users will participate in the first ever EGNSS User Consultation Platform (UCP), broken into four thematic groups - Transport, Mass Market, Professional and R&D. The participants in the thematic groups will then discuss their findings in a plenary session, to be held on the second day of the Assembly.

Improving service delivery

Participants in the event will be given a general update on the Galileo programme, along with presentations on Galileo Initial Services performance, the Galileo Services Roadmap and the Galileo User Interfaces. They will also have the opportunity to take part in the 2017 Galileo User Satisfaction Survey, through which the GSA aims to gain a better understanding of Galileo’s value to users, aiming at continuously improving service delivery. The User Consultation Platform will be covering both EGNOS and Galileo.

Watch this: Galileo Initial Services

The 1st Galileo User Assembly will be hosted by the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) at its premises in Madrid. The GSC provides an interface for the Galileo Open Service (OS), Commercial Service (CS) and Safety-of-Life (SoL) user communities, and participants in the Assembly will have the opportunity to tour the premises and to take part in a networking reception.

You can pre-register to attend the 1st Galileo User Assembly here. Places are limited, so filling out the form does not guarantee a place. You will receive a confirmation via email once your request is processed.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The 1st Galileo User Assembly will give users the chance to discuss their experience of using Galileo so far, and their needs for the future

Don’t miss the 1st Galileo User Assembly set for November 28-29

19.10.2017 15:32  
Published: 
20 October 2017

The 1st Galileo User Assembly is set to take place in Madrid on November 28-29. The event will provide Galileo and EGNOS users with the opportunity to discuss their needs, share their experience and provide feedback on EGNSS performance.

One year after the launch of Galileo Initial Services, in December 2016, EGNSS users will gather for the 1st Galileo User Assembly in Madrid this November. On the first day of the Assembly, Galileo and EGNOS users will participate in the first ever EGNSS User Consultation Platform (UCP), broken into four thematic groups - Transport, Mass Market, Professional and R&D. The participants in the thematic groups will then discuss their findings in a plenary session, to be held on the second day of the Assembly.

Improving service delivery

Participants in the event will be given a general update on the Galileo programme, along with presentations on Galileo Initial Services performance, the Galileo Services Roadmap and the Galileo User Interfaces. They will also have the opportunity to take part in the 2017 Galileo User Satisfaction Survey, through which the GSA aims to gain a better understanding of Galileo’s value to users, aiming at continuously improving service delivery. The User Consultation Platform will be covering both EGNOS and Galileo.

Watch this: Galileo Initial Services

The 1st Galileo User Assembly will be hosted by the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) at its premises in Madrid. The GSC provides an interface for the Galileo Open Service (OS), Commercial Service (CS) and Safety-of-Life (SoL) user communities, and participants in the Assembly will have the opportunity to tour the premises and to take part in a networking reception.

You can pre-register to attend the 1st Galileo User Assembly here. Places are limited, so filling out the form does not guarantee a place. You will receive a confirmation via email once your request is processed.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The 1st Galileo User Assembly will give users the chance to discuss their experience of using Galileo so far, and their needs for the future

Don’t miss the 1st Galileo User Assembly set for November 28-29

19.10.2017 15:32  

The 1st Galileo User Assembly is set to take place in Madrid on November 28-29. The event will provide Galileo and EGNOS users with the opportunity to discuss their needs, share their experience and provide feedback on EGNSS performance.

One year after the launch of Galileo Initial Services, in December 2016, EGNSS users will gather for the 1st Galileo User Assembly in Madrid this November. On the first day of the Assembly, Galileo and EGNOS users will participate in the first ever EGNSS User Consultation Platform (UCP), broken into four thematic groups - Transport, Mass Market, Professional and R&D. The participants in the thematic groups will then discuss their findings in a plenary session, to be held on the second day of the Assembly.

Improving service delivery

Participants in the event will be given a general update on the Galileo programme, along with presentations on Galileo Initial Services performance, the Galileo Services Roadmap and the Galileo User Interfaces. They will also have the opportunity to take part in the 2017 Galileo User Satisfaction Survey, through which the GSA aims to gain a better understanding of Galileo’s value to users, aiming at continuously improving service delivery. The User Consultation Platform will be covering both EGNOS and Galileo.

Watch this: Galileo Initial Services

The 1st Galileo User Assembly will be hosted by the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) at its premises in Madrid. The GSC provides an interface for the Galileo Open Service (OS), Commercial Service (CS) and Safety-of-Life (SoL) user communities, and participants in the Assembly will have the opportunity to tour the premises and to take part in a networking reception.

You can pre-register to attend the 1st Galileo User Assembly here. Places are limited, so filling out the form does not guarantee a place. You will receive a confirmation via email once your request is processed.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The 1st Galileo User Assembly will give users the chance to discuss their experience of using Galileo so far, and their needs for the future

Don’t miss the 1st Galileo User Assembly set for November 28-29

19.10.2017 15:32  
Published: 
20 October 2017

The 1st Galileo User Assembly is set to take place in Madrid on November 28-29. The event will provide Galileo and EGNOS users with the opportunity to discuss their needs, share their experience and provide feedback on EGNSS performance.

One year after the launch of Galileo Initial Services, in December 2016, EGNSS users will gather for the 1st Galileo User Assembly in Madrid this November. On the first day of the Assembly, Galileo and EGNOS users will participate in the first ever EGNSS User Consultation Platform (UCP), broken into four thematic groups - Transport, Mass Market, Professional and R&D. The participants in the thematic groups will then discuss their findings in a plenary session, to be held on the second day of the Assembly.

Improving service delivery

Participants in the event will be given a general update on the Galileo programme, along with presentations on Galileo Initial Services performance, the Galileo Services Roadmap and the Galileo User Interfaces. They will also have the opportunity to take part in the 2017 Galileo User Satisfaction Survey, through which the GSA aims to gain a better understanding of Galileo’s value to users, aiming at continuously improving service delivery. The User Consultation Platform will be covering both EGNOS and Galileo.

Watch this: Galileo Initial Services

The 1st Galileo User Assembly will be hosted by the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) at its premises in Madrid. The GSC provides an interface for the Galileo Open Service (OS), Commercial Service (CS) and Safety-of-Life (SoL) user communities, and participants in the Assembly will have the opportunity to tour the premises and to take part in a networking reception.

You can pre-register to attend the 1st Galileo User Assembly here. Places are limited, so filling out the form does not guarantee a place. You will receive a confirmation via email once your request is processed.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The 1st Galileo User Assembly will give users the chance to discuss their experience of using Galileo so far, and their needs for the future

Don’t miss the 1st Galileo User Assembly set for November 28-29

19.10.2017 15:32  

The 1st Galileo User Assembly is set to take place in Madrid on November 28-29. The event will provide Galileo and EGNOS users with the opportunity to discuss their needs, share their experience and provide feedback on EGNSS performance.

One year after the launch of Galileo Initial Services, in December 2016, EGNSS users will gather for the 1st Galileo User Assembly in Madrid this November. On the first day of the Assembly, Galileo and EGNOS users will participate in the first ever EGNSS User Consultation Platform (UCP), broken into four thematic groups - Transport, Mass Market, Professional and R&D. The participants in the thematic groups will then discuss their findings in a plenary session, to be held on the second day of the Assembly.

Improving service delivery

Participants in the event will be given a general update on the Galileo programme, along with presentations on Galileo Initial Services performance, the Galileo Services Roadmap and the Galileo User Interfaces. They will also have the opportunity to take part in the 2017 Galileo User Satisfaction Survey, through which the GSA aims to gain a better understanding of Galileo’s value to users, aiming at continuously improving service delivery. The User Consultation Platform will be covering both EGNOS and Galileo.

Watch this: Galileo Initial Services

The 1st Galileo User Assembly will be hosted by the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) at its premises in Madrid. The GSC provides an interface for the Galileo Open Service (OS), Commercial Service (CS) and Safety-of-Life (SoL) user communities, and participants in the Assembly will have the opportunity to tour the premises and to take part in a networking reception.

You can pre-register to attend the 1st Galileo User Assembly here. Places are limited, so filling out the form does not guarantee a place. You will receive a confirmation via email once your request is processed.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The 1st Galileo User Assembly will give users the chance to discuss their experience of using Galileo so far, and their needs for the future

Don’t miss the 1st Galileo User Assembly set for November 28-29

19.10.2017 15:32  
Published: 
20 October 2017

The 1st Galileo User Assembly is set to take place in Madrid on November 28-29. The event will provide Galileo and EGNOS users with the opportunity to discuss their needs, share their experience and provide feedback on EGNSS performance.

One year after the launch of Galileo Initial Services, in December 2016, EGNSS users will gather for the 1st Galileo User Assembly in Madrid this November. On the first day of the Assembly, Galileo and EGNOS users will participate in the first ever EGNSS User Consultation Platform (UCP), broken into four thematic groups - Transport, Mass Market, Professional and R&D. The participants in the thematic groups will then discuss their findings in a plenary session, to be held on the second day of the Assembly.

Improving service delivery

Participants in the event will be given a general update on the Galileo programme, along with presentations on Galileo Initial Services performance, the Galileo Services Roadmap and the Galileo User Interfaces. They will also have the opportunity to take part in the 2017 Galileo User Satisfaction Survey, through which the GSA aims to gain a better understanding of Galileo’s value to users, aiming at continuously improving service delivery. The User Consultation Platform will be covering both EGNOS and Galileo.

Watch this: Galileo Initial Services

The 1st Galileo User Assembly will be hosted by the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) at its premises in Madrid. The GSC provides an interface for the Galileo Open Service (OS), Commercial Service (CS) and Safety-of-Life (SoL) user communities, and participants in the Assembly will have the opportunity to tour the premises and to take part in a networking reception.

You can pre-register to attend the 1st Galileo User Assembly here. Places are limited, so filling out the form does not guarantee a place. You will receive a confirmation via email once your request is processed.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The 1st Galileo User Assembly will give users the chance to discuss their experience of using Galileo so far, and their needs for the future

Galileo and Copernicus combine forces at InterGEO 2017

17.10.2017 12:06  
Published: 
17 October 2017

For the European GNSS Agency (GSA) and the European Commission, the aim of this year's joint appearance by Galileo and Copernicus at InterGEO 2017 was to highlight the powerful synergies that exist between the two services.

 

"This is the first time we have shared a common stand at an event of this type," said GSA Market Development Officer Reinhard Blasi. "The GNSS community knows a lot about Galileo already, and is getting increasingly interested to know more about Copernicus. This is Europe's earth observation and monitoring programme, which, like Galileo, delivers openly and freely both operational data and information services impacting a wide range of application areas. "

 

Blasi was speaking at the world's premier event for the geospatial industry, and the joint use of E-GNSS and earth observation data certainly enables many applications of great interest to the mapping and surveying communities that gather at InterGEO. But there are also large numbers of potential value-added applications for the agriculture sector, for smart cities, road transport, maritime navigation, emergency/crisis management, utilities and many others.

 

Among the specific examples presented, a notable one is in the area of precision agriculture, where Copernicus can deliver detailed information about soil and plant condition, which can then be used to generate precise maps of parameters on the field. Farmers can then overlay Galileo- and EGNOS-generated location maps to guide targeted irrigation and other operations in their fields. "Synergies exist in many additional segments for example in biomass monitoring, hydrographical offshore surveying or border surveillance."

 

In the area of environmental management, Copernicus delivers key information on the state of forests, water quality and snow cover, while again Galileo and EGNOS provide geo-tagging of samples as well as precise guidance to specific areas of interest.

 

“It always boils down to the principle that Copernicus tells you what is around you while with EGNOS and Galileo you precisely know where you are.”

 

Many applications

 

The European Union is supporting a major initiative in the area of Smart Cities. Here, Copernicus can be of great use in the monitoring of urban growth, green areas, and land use, both legal and illegal, while European GNSS can be combined with this kind of information to help better understand the mobility habits of urban citizens.

 

"For public authorities, combined Earth observation and GNSS information is really very valuable," said Blasi, "for urban planning, defining new urban corridors, monitoring land movements and infrastructure projects and supporting law enforcement. And all of these are just a few of the areas where Galileo and Copernicus can work together to provide something that is more powerful than either one by itself."

 

At the joint Galileo/Copernicus stand in the InterGEo exhibition area, representatives from the German Aerospace Centre (DLR) the Copernicus Support Office, provided more insights into what can be accomplished by combining Copernicus and Galileo data.

 

There was also an array of representatives on hand from small and medium-sized companies that have been involved in Galileo initiatives, all ready to meet visitors and answer questions. For everyone involved in the two programmes, the experience of coming together and presenting, for the first time, a united front in a very large public forum, appeared to be productive and ultimately very rewarding.

 

Blasi said that in the future the two programmes would be more likely to work together in this way. "Galileo and Copernicus really do complement each other," he said, "so it makes sense for us, the people who work on these programmes, to come together like this, to tell our stories and promote our work, which is really of great benefit to the public and industry."

 

The UNOOSA and GSA are preparing a report to be published shortly on the EGNSS-Copernicus synergies. The emphasis is on the impact of the joint usage of GNSS and Earth Observation may have to support the countries to reach the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). 

 

More good news for European GNSS

 

A special conference session at InterGEO allows describing in detail Galileo operational status as well as the state of play among GNSS receiver manufacturers and the wider GNSS market, including the recent launch by Broadcom of the world's first dual frequency GNSS receiver for smartphones.

 

Broadcom Limited is a worldwide semiconductor leader, and its new chipset will provide, among other things, lane-level accuracy with minimal power consumption and will help to enable a new range of high-precision LBS applications.

 

As the GSA has pointed out, Europe’s Galileo constellation is largely responsible for the expanded availability of L1/E1 and L5/E5 frequencies for mass market applications, making it possible to use both frequencies to compute position much more accurately.

 

Special Galileo student prize awarded

 

InterGEO 2017 was also the occasion to recognize the work of some outstanding young people, in the context of the CLGE Students Contest. Every year, the Council of European Geodetic Surveyors (CLGE) organises the contest aimed at rewarding research in various surveying-related areas.

 

This year, as it has in previous years, the GSA sponsored a special prize for entries that show a dedicated use of Galileo, EGNOS and/or Copernicus. The winner, announced at InterGEO, was Sander Varbla from the Tallinn University of Technology in Estonia.

 

Varbla's paper, entitled 'Assessment of marine geoid models by ship-borne GNSS profiles', presented the results of a 2016 marine gravity and GNSS campaign carried out on board the Estonian Maritime Administration survey vessel 'Jakob Prei' in the WestEstonian archipeligo.

 

After receiving the award and thanking the GSA and contest organisers, Varbla said, "This means a lot to me. It means that my work is valued and it makes a difference, and I'm really looking forward to continuing with this kind of research."

 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Galileo and Copernicus combine forces at InterGEO 2017

Updated Galileo Satellite Metadata now available

16.10.2017 13:53  
Published: 
16 October 2017

The European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) has published updated Galileo Satellite Metadata information on its web portal.

The updated Metadata contains information on the properties of both Galileo IOV (In-Orbit Validation) and Galileo FOC (Full Operational Capability) satellites, including:

  • Physical characteristics (mass, area of reflectivity, etc.)
  • Attitude law
  • Antenna parameters (Phase Centre Offsets (PCOs), Phase Centre Variations (PCVs)

This information is required to properly implement advanced processing algorithms for precise orbit determination or Precise Point Positioning (PPP). 

The updated information can be found under the ‘Support to Developers’ tab in the Galileo Satellite Metadata section. 

All questions and comments can be directed to the Galileo Helpdesk.

About the GSC

The GSC is run by the European GNSS Agency (GSA). It was created to act as an interface between the Galileo system and its end users. The aim of the GSC is to provide system users with relevant information on Galileo. Through the easy-to-use GSC web portal, Galileo users can access a Helpdesk dedicated to addressing a wide range of questions on the status of Galileo and its use. The GSC also actively provides support to R&D and industry from its centre of expertise, as well as hosts workshops and training sessions.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The updated Metadata contains information on the properties of both Galileo IOV (In-Orbit Validation) and Galileo FOC (Full Operational Capability) satellites.

Updated Galileo Satellite Metadata now available

16.10.2017 13:53  
Published: 
16 October 2017

The European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) has published updated Galileo Satellite Metadata information on its web portal.

The updated Metadata contains information on the properties of both Galileo IOV (In-Orbit Validation) and Galileo FOC (Full Operational Capability) satellites, including:

  • Physical characteristics (mass, area of reflectivity, etc.)
  • Attitude law
  • Antenna parameters (Phase Centre Offsets (PCOs), Phase Centre Variations (PCVs)

This information is required to properly implement advanced processing algorithms for precise orbit determination or Precise Point Positioning (PPP). 

The updated information can be found under the ‘Support to Developers’ tab in the Galileo Satellite Metadata section. 

All questions and comments can be directed to the Galileo Helpdesk.

About the GSC

The GSC is run by the European GNSS Agency (GSA). It was created to act as an interface between the Galileo system and its end users. The aim of the GSC is to provide system users with relevant information on Galileo. Through the easy-to-use GSC web portal, Galileo users can access a Helpdesk dedicated to addressing a wide range of questions on the status of Galileo and its use. The GSC also actively provides support to R&D and industry from its centre of expertise, as well as hosts workshops and training sessions.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The updated Metadata contains information on the properties of both Galileo IOV (In-Orbit Validation) and Galileo FOC (Full Operational Capability) satellites.

Updated Galileo Satellite Metadata now available

16.10.2017 13:53  
Published: 
16 October 2017

The European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) has published updated Galileo Satellite Metadata information on its web portal.

The updated Metadata contains information on the properties of both Galileo IOV (In-Orbit Validation) and Galileo FOC (Full Operational Capability) satellites, including:

  • Physical characteristics (mass, area of reflectivity, etc.)
  • Attitude law
  • Antenna parameters (Phase Centre Offsets (PCOs), Phase Centre Variations (PCVs)

This information is required to properly implement advanced processing algorithms for precise orbit determination or Precise Point Positioning (PPP). 

The updated information can be found under the ‘Support to Developers’ tab in the Galileo Satellite Metadata section. 

All questions and comments can be directed to the Galileo Helpdesk.

About the GSC

The GSC is run by the European GNSS Agency (GSA). It was created to act as an interface between the Galileo system and its end users. The aim of the GSC is to provide system users with relevant information on Galileo. Through the easy-to-use GSC web portal, Galileo users can access a Helpdesk dedicated to addressing a wide range of questions on the status of Galileo and its use. The GSC also actively provides support to R&D and industry from its centre of expertise, as well as hosts workshops and training sessions.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The updated Metadata contains information on the properties of both Galileo IOV (In-Orbit Validation) and Galileo FOC (Full Operational Capability) satellites.

Updated Galileo Satellite Metadata now available

16.10.2017 13:53  
Published: 
16 October 2017

The European GNSS Service Centre (GSC) has published updated Galileo Satellite Metadata information on its web portal.

The updated Metadata contains information on the properties of both Galileo IOV (In-Orbit Validation) and Galileo FOC (Full Operational Capability) satellites, including:

  • Physical characteristics (mass, area of reflectivity, etc.)
  • Attitude law
  • Antenna parameters (Phase Centre Offsets (PCOs), Phase Centre Variations (PCVs)

This information is required to properly implement advanced processing algorithms for precise orbit determination or Precise Point Positioning (PPP). 

The updated information can be found under the ‘Support to Developers’ tab in the Galileo Satellite Metadata section. 

All questions and comments can be directed to the Galileo Helpdesk.

About the GSC

The GSC is run by the European GNSS Agency (GSA). It was created to act as an interface between the Galileo system and its end users. The aim of the GSC is to provide system users with relevant information on Galileo. Through the easy-to-use GSC web portal, Galileo users can access a Helpdesk dedicated to addressing a wide range of questions on the status of Galileo and its use. The GSC also actively provides support to R&D and industry from its centre of expertise, as well as hosts workshops and training sessions.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The updated Metadata contains information on the properties of both Galileo IOV (In-Orbit Validation) and Galileo FOC (Full Operational Capability) satellites.

Precision farming becoming more and more important in modern agriculture

12.10.2017 11:19  
Published: 
12 October 2017

Agriculture faces significant challenges, there is ever-increasing pressure on profit margins and farmers are also trying to produce food in the most sustainable way possible.

The AGRO SHOW in Bednary, near Poznan, is an opportunity for companies to showcase the latest technologies to help farmers work as efficiently as possible. Precision farming makes use of satellite technology allowing real-time management of crops, fields and animals. It helps to monitor and reduce the environmental impact of farming. This is underlined, for instance, by the “European Innovation Partnership for Agricultural Productivity and Sustainability (EIP-AGRI). This Partnership was launched in 2012 by the European Commission (DG AGRI) to contribute to the European Union's 'Europe 2020' strategy for smart, sustainable and inclusive growth, in which precision farming plays a key role.

The Bednary show focuses on arable farming. Combining sensor technologies with software linked to EGNOS and Galileo allows farmers to monitor and react to what is happening on the ground. Sensors can pick up on water, nutrient and pesticide levels. The technology will identify where product is needed and the best way to deliver this on the ground. It is also used for seeding and harvesting.

Most producers of agricultural vehicles have incorporated satellite receivers into their machinery to make sure they can offer the highest levels of productivity to farmers. We spoke to three companies to find out how they were making use of GNSS to help farmers.
‘Precision engineering is becoming more and more important in modern agriculture’

Karl Wilhelm Hundertmark, CLAAS Polska, spoke about the role of precision machinery in agriculture, which he said is becoming more and more important. He said that machines were now installed with standard informatics tools that, for example, help to manage fuel consumption and carry out early diagnosis of machine faults. CLAAS, like many manufacturers, install EGNOS as standard in all their agricultural vehicles and for ploughing and spraying it is particularly useful. For seeding, further accuracy is needed, down to as little as two to three centimetres.

Galileo enabled device for precision agriculture

Jerzy Koronczok, Agrocom Polska presented the software developed in the course of the Geopal H2020 project, which can be accessed through any computer. This tool also requires a small Galileo enabled device. This little box (see photo) is useful to all farmers, including small farmers, as it can be added to older machinery. It works with a tablet or smart phone and is a cost-effective solution to digitally document all the farm’s machinery and equipment. Movement and location are easily monitored through the application, which makes use of Galileo satellite signals. Free of charge in its basic version, farmers can tailor it to their specific needs. Farmers can also decide which additional components they need to buy, so that they only pay for what they really need.

‘Customers can save a lot of money on all agriculture products through technology’

Bogdan Kazimierczak, Product Sales Specialist with John Deere Polska, stood beside a large picture of a tractor on the moon! The image makes the point that precision farming tools use satellite information. Kazinierczak explained that these technologies save farmers a lot of money on fertilizers, pesticides and fuel. He said that even smaller farms of 75 hectares can make use of applications to help manage their properties as efficiently as possible.

Kazinierczak says that there are also benefits for the environment. Precision agriculture can reduce the risk of excess chemicals going into the ground by making use of section controls. For example, in an area where chemicals can’t be used, the system will be shut off and no chemicals will be sprayed. So, developments in the agriculture sector are showing that, as highlighted in a European Parliament study on precision agriculture, “suitable services from GNSS developments (Galileo) as a key feature of Precision Agriculture are a priority, but also more easily available data from remote sensing programmes (Copernicus) can be a stimulant to improving Precision Agriculture applications.”

So, it seems that exploiting the synergies between Galileo and Copernicus is the way forward for agriculture.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Many agricultural machinery manufacturers install EGNOS as standard

Precision farming becoming more and more important in modern agriculture

12.10.2017 11:19  
Published: 
12 October 2017

Agriculture faces significant challenges, there is ever-increasing pressure on profit margins and farmers are also trying to produce food in the most sustainable way possible.

The AGRO SHOW in Bednary, near Poznan, is an opportunity for companies to showcase the latest technologies to help farmers work as efficiently as possible. Precision farming makes use of satellite technology allowing real-time management of crops, fields and animals. It helps to monitor and reduce the environmental impact of farming. This is underlined, for instance, by the “European Innovation Partnership for Agricultural Productivity and Sustainability (EIP-AGRI). This Partnership was launched in 2012 by the European Commission (DG AGRI) to contribute to the European Union's 'Europe 2020' strategy for smart, sustainable and inclusive growth, in which precision farming plays a key role.

The Bednary show focuses on arable farming. Combining sensor technologies with software linked to EGNOS and Galileo allows farmers to monitor and react to what is happening on the ground. Sensors can pick up on water, nutrient and pesticide levels. The technology will identify where product is needed and the best way to deliver this on the ground. It is also used for seeding and harvesting.

Most producers of agricultural vehicles have incorporated satellite receivers into their machinery to make sure they can offer the highest levels of productivity to farmers. We spoke to three companies to find out how they were making use of GNSS to help farmers.
‘Precision engineering is becoming more and more important in modern agriculture’

Karl Wilhelm Hundertmark, CLAAS Polska, spoke about the role of precision machinery in agriculture, which he said is becoming more and more important. He said that machines were now installed with standard informatics tools that, for example, help to manage fuel consumption and carry out early diagnosis of machine faults. CLAAS, like many manufacturers, install EGNOS as standard in all their agricultural vehicles and for ploughing and spraying it is particularly useful. For seeding, further accuracy is needed, down to as little as two to three centimetres.

Galileo enabled device for precision agriculture

Jerzy Koronczok, Agrocom Polska presented the software developed in the course of the Geopal H2020 project, which can be accessed through any computer. This tool also requires a small Galileo enabled device. This little box (see photo) is useful to all farmers, including small farmers, as it can be added to older machinery. It works with a tablet or smart phone and is a cost-effective solution to digitally document all the farm’s machinery and equipment. Movement and location are easily monitored through the application, which makes use of Galileo satellite signals. Free of charge in its basic version, farmers can tailor it to their specific needs. Farmers can also decide which additional components they need to buy, so that they only pay for what they really need.

‘Customers can save a lot of money on all agriculture products through technology’

Bogdan Kazimierczak, Product Sales Specialist with John Deere Polska, stood beside a large picture of a tractor on the moon! The image makes the point that precision farming tools use satellite information. Kazinierczak explained that these technologies save farmers a lot of money on fertilizers, pesticides and fuel. He said that even smaller farms of 75 hectares can make use of applications to help manage their properties as efficiently as possible.

Kazinierczak says that there are also benefits for the environment. Precision agriculture can reduce the risk of excess chemicals going into the ground by making use of section controls. For example, in an area where chemicals can’t be used, the system will be shut off and no chemicals will be sprayed. So, developments in the agriculture sector are showing that, as highlighted in a European Parliament study on precision agriculture, “suitable services from GNSS developments (Galileo) as a key feature of Precision Agriculture are a priority, but also more easily available data from remote sensing programmes (Copernicus) can be a stimulant to improving Precision Agriculture applications.”

So, it seems that exploiting the synergies between Galileo and Copernicus is the way forward for agriculture.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Many agricultural machinery manufacturers install EGNOS as standard

Precision farming becoming more and more important in modern agriculture

12.10.2017 11:19  
Published: 
12 October 2017

Agriculture faces significant challenges, there is ever-increasing pressure on profit margins and farmers are also trying to produce food in the most sustainable way possible.

The AGRO SHOW in Bednary, near Poznan, is an opportunity for companies to showcase the latest technologies to help farmers work as efficiently as possible. Precision farming makes use of satellite technology allowing real-time management of crops, fields and animals. It helps to monitor and reduce the environmental impact of farming. This is underlined, for instance, by the “European Innovation Partnership for Agricultural Productivity and Sustainability (EIP-AGRI). This Partnership was launched in 2012 by the European Commission (DG AGRI) to contribute to the European Union's 'Europe 2020' strategy for smart, sustainable and inclusive growth, in which precision farming plays a key role.

The Bednary show focuses on arable farming. Combining sensor technologies with software linked to EGNOS and Galileo allows farmers to monitor and react to what is happening on the ground. Sensors can pick up on water, nutrient and pesticide levels. The technology will identify where product is needed and the best way to deliver this on the ground. It is also used for seeding and harvesting.

Most producers of agricultural vehicles have incorporated satellite receivers into their machinery to make sure they can offer the highest levels of productivity to farmers. We spoke to three companies to find out how they were making use of GNSS to help farmers.
‘Precision engineering is becoming more and more important in modern agriculture’

Karl Wilhelm Hundertmark, CLAAS Polska, spoke about the role of precision machinery in agriculture, which he said is becoming more and more important. He said that machines were now installed with standard informatics tools that, for example, help to manage fuel consumption and carry out early diagnosis of machine faults. CLAAS, like many manufacturers, install EGNOS as standard in all their agricultural vehicles and for ploughing and spraying it is particularly useful. For seeding, further accuracy is needed, down to as little as two to three centimetres.

Galileo enabled device for precision agriculture

Jerzy Koronczok, Agrocom Polska presented the software developed in the course of the Geopal H2020 project, which can be accessed through any computer. This tool also requires a small Galileo enabled device. This little box (see photo) is useful to all farmers, including small farmers, as it can be added to older machinery. It works with a tablet or smart phone and is a cost-effective solution to digitally document all the farm’s machinery and equipment. Movement and location are easily monitored through the application, which makes use of Galileo satellite signals. Free of charge in its basic version, farmers can tailor it to their specific needs. Farmers can also decide which additional components they need to buy, so that they only pay for what they really need.

‘Customers can save a lot of money on all agriculture products through technology’

Bogdan Kazimierczak, Product Sales Specialist with John Deere Polska, stood beside a large picture of a tractor on the moon! The image makes the point that precision farming tools use satellite information. Kazinierczak explained that these technologies save farmers a lot of money on fertilizers, pesticides and fuel. He said that even smaller farms of 75 hectares can make use of applications to help manage their properties as efficiently as possible.

Kazinierczak says that there are also benefits for the environment. Precision agriculture can reduce the risk of excess chemicals going into the ground by making use of section controls. For example, in an area where chemicals can’t be used, the system will be shut off and no chemicals will be sprayed. So, developments in the agriculture sector are showing that, as highlighted in a European Parliament study on precision agriculture, “suitable services from GNSS developments (Galileo) as a key feature of Precision Agriculture are a priority, but also more easily available data from remote sensing programmes (Copernicus) can be a stimulant to improving Precision Agriculture applications.”

So, it seems that exploiting the synergies between Galileo and Copernicus is the way forward for agriculture.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Many agricultural machinery manufacturers install EGNOS as standard

Precision farming becoming more and more important in modern agriculture

12.10.2017 11:19  
Published: 
12 October 2017

Agriculture faces significant challenges, there is ever-increasing pressure on profit margins and farmers are also trying to produce food in the most sustainable way possible.

The AGRO SHOW in Bednary, near Poznan, is an opportunity for companies to showcase the latest technologies to help farmers work as efficiently as possible. Precision farming makes use of satellite technology allowing real-time management of crops, fields and animals. It helps to monitor and reduce the environmental impact of farming. This is underlined, for instance, by the “European Innovation Partnership for Agricultural Productivity and Sustainability (EIP-AGRI). This Partnership was launched in 2012 by the European Commission (DG AGRI) to contribute to the European Union's 'Europe 2020' strategy for smart, sustainable and inclusive growth, in which precision farming plays a key role.

The Bednary show focuses on arable farming. Combining sensor technologies with software linked to EGNOS and Galileo allows farmers to monitor and react to what is happening on the ground. Sensors can pick up on water, nutrient and pesticide levels. The technology will identify where product is needed and the best way to deliver this on the ground. It is also used for seeding and harvesting.

Most producers of agricultural vehicles have incorporated satellite receivers into their machinery to make sure they can offer the highest levels of productivity to farmers. We spoke to three companies to find out how they were making use of GNSS to help farmers.
‘Precision engineering is becoming more and more important in modern agriculture’

Karl Wilhelm Hundertmark, CLAAS Polska, spoke about the role of precision machinery in agriculture, which he said is becoming more and more important. He said that machines were now installed with standard informatics tools that, for example, help to manage fuel consumption and carry out early diagnosis of machine faults. CLAAS, like many manufacturers, install EGNOS as standard in all their agricultural vehicles and for ploughing and spraying it is particularly useful. For seeding, further accuracy is needed, down to as little as two to three centimetres.

Galileo enabled device for precision agriculture

Jerzy Koronczok, Agrocom Polska presented the software developed in the course of the Geopal H2020 project, which can be accessed through any computer. This tool also requires a small Galileo enabled device. This little box (see photo) is useful to all farmers, including small farmers, as it can be added to older machinery. It works with a tablet or smart phone and is a cost-effective solution to digitally document all the farm’s machinery and equipment. Movement and location are easily monitored through the application, which makes use of Galileo satellite signals. Free of charge in its basic version, farmers can tailor it to their specific needs. Farmers can also decide which additional components they need to buy, so that they only pay for what they really need.

‘Customers can save a lot of money on all agriculture products through technology’

Bogdan Kazimierczak, Product Sales Specialist with John Deere Polska, stood beside a large picture of a tractor on the moon! The image makes the point that precision farming tools use satellite information. Kazinierczak explained that these technologies save farmers a lot of money on fertilizers, pesticides and fuel. He said that even smaller farms of 75 hectares can make use of applications to help manage their properties as efficiently as possible.

Kazinierczak says that there are also benefits for the environment. Precision agriculture can reduce the risk of excess chemicals going into the ground by making use of section controls. For example, in an area where chemicals can’t be used, the system will be shut off and no chemicals will be sprayed. So, developments in the agriculture sector are showing that, as highlighted in a European Parliament study on precision agriculture, “suitable services from GNSS developments (Galileo) as a key feature of Precision Agriculture are a priority, but also more easily available data from remote sensing programmes (Copernicus) can be a stimulant to improving Precision Agriculture applications.”

So, it seems that exploiting the synergies between Galileo and Copernicus is the way forward for agriculture.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Many agricultural machinery manufacturers install EGNOS as standard

Precision farming becoming more and more important in modern agriculture

12.10.2017 11:19  
Published: 
12 October 2017

Agriculture faces significant challenges, there is ever-increasing pressure on profit margins and farmers are also trying to produce food in the most sustainable way possible.

The AGRO SHOW in Bednary, near Poznan, is an opportunity for companies to showcase the latest technologies to help farmers work as efficiently as possible. Precision farming makes use of satellite technology allowing real-time management of crops, fields and animals. It helps to monitor and reduce the environmental impact of farming. This is underlined, for instance, by the “European Innovation Partnership for Agricultural Productivity and Sustainability (EIP-AGRI). This Partnership was launched in 2012 by the European Commission (DG AGRI) to contribute to the European Union's 'Europe 2020' strategy for smart, sustainable and inclusive growth, in which precision farming plays a key role.

The Bednary show focuses on arable farming. Combining sensor technologies with software linked to EGNOS and Galileo allows farmers to monitor and react to what is happening on the ground. Sensors can pick up on water, nutrient and pesticide levels. The technology will identify where product is needed and the best way to deliver this on the ground. It is also used for seeding and harvesting.

Most producers of agricultural vehicles have incorporated satellite receivers into their machinery to make sure they can offer the highest levels of productivity to farmers. We spoke to three companies to find out how they were making use of GNSS to help farmers.
‘Precision engineering is becoming more and more important in modern agriculture’

Karl Wilhelm Hundertmark, CLAAS Polska, spoke about the role of precision machinery in agriculture, which he said is becoming more and more important. He said that machines were now installed with standard informatics tools that, for example, help to manage fuel consumption and carry out early diagnosis of machine faults. CLAAS, like many manufacturers, install EGNOS as standard in all their agricultural vehicles and for ploughing and spraying it is particularly useful. For seeding, further accuracy is needed, down to as little as two to three centimetres.

Galileo enabled device for precision agriculture

Jerzy Koronczok, Agrocom Polska presented the software developed in the course of the Geopal H2020 project, which can be accessed through any computer. This tool also requires a small Galileo enabled device. This little box (see photo) is useful to all farmers, including small farmers, as it can be added to older machinery. It works with a tablet or smart phone and is a cost-effective solution to digitally document all the farm’s machinery and equipment. Movement and location are easily monitored through the application, which makes use of Galileo satellite signals. Free of charge in its basic version, farmers can tailor it to their specific needs. Farmers can also decide which additional components they need to buy, so that they only pay for what they really need.

‘Customers can save a lot of money on all agriculture products through technology’

Bogdan Kazimierczak, Product Sales Specialist with John Deere Polska, stood beside a large picture of a tractor on the moon! The image makes the point that precision farming tools use satellite information. Kazinierczak explained that these technologies save farmers a lot of money on fertilizers, pesticides and fuel. He said that even smaller farms of 75 hectares can make use of applications to help manage their properties as efficiently as possible.

Kazinierczak says that there are also benefits for the environment. Precision agriculture can reduce the risk of excess chemicals going into the ground by making use of section controls. For example, in an area where chemicals can’t be used, the system will be shut off and no chemicals will be sprayed. So, developments in the agriculture sector are showing that, as highlighted in a European Parliament study on precision agriculture, “suitable services from GNSS developments (Galileo) as a key feature of Precision Agriculture are a priority, but also more easily available data from remote sensing programmes (Copernicus) can be a stimulant to improving Precision Agriculture applications.”

So, it seems that exploiting the synergies between Galileo and Copernicus is the way forward for agriculture.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Many agricultural machinery manufacturers install EGNOS as standard

Be part of the EGNOS aviation services evolution

6.10.2017 12:15  
Published: 
06 October 2017

The European Commission (EC), Directorate-General for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs, is defining the roadmap for the evolution of the EGNOS programme beyond the EGNOS Service Releases of EGNOS V3 currently defined. Evolutions shall support the implementation of safer and more efficient aviation operations. In this sense, further evolutions of EGNOS services for aviation safety beyond 2025 could take any of the following three directions, either:

(1)    Enlarge the provision of EGNOS services to Communication Navigation Surveillance (CNS) and Air Traffic Management (ATM) beyond navigation, notably to address surveillance (ADS-B) and possibly support timing services for communication systems; this approach is aligned with the vision of integrated CNS;

 (2)    Provide additional features to increase the robustness against external intentional or unintentional threats/attacks to the EGNOS navigation service, for instance by adding authentication to GNSS signals or ad hoc features at antenna and receiver level;

 (3)    Enhance the navigation, positioning and/or timing performance provided at user level, for instance by improving the vertical position accuracy and the time-to-alert to enable supporting Cat-II approach procedures.

The aims are to analyse and define the reasons motivating evolutions along those three axes beyond 2025, determine constraints and pre-requisites, and assess the added value to end users. The analysis shall consider each area separately and determine under what condition it would be beneficial for the programme to implement these services. The analysis shall focus on:

(1)    Identifying user requirements for each of these new services and how they translate into service requirements for EGNOS;

 (2)    Defining the associated regulatory constraints and safety analyses required before the service can be implemented operationally;

(3)    Analysing the added value for aviation end users and defining how the service could be provided, to enable a programmatic decision on which service should be implemented as a priority.

The study will be fully financed by the European Commission under the Horizon 2020 framework programme for research and innovation, within the budget allocated to the evolution of the EGNOS mission. The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is in charge of the technical supervision of the project on behalf of the European Commission.

More information about the invitation to tender can be found here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Be part of the EGNOS aviation services evolution

Be part of the EGNOS aviation services evolution

6.10.2017 12:15  
Published: 
06 October 2017

The European Commission (EC), Directorate-General for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs, is defining the roadmap for the evolution of the EGNOS programme beyond the EGNOS Service Releases of EGNOS V3 currently defined. Evolutions shall support the implementation of safer and more efficient aviation operations. In this sense, further evolutions of EGNOS services for aviation safety beyond 2025 could take any of the following three directions, either:

(1)    Enlarge the provision of EGNOS services to Communication Navigation Surveillance (CNS) and Air Traffic Management (ATM) beyond navigation, notably to address surveillance (ADS-B) and possibly support timing services for communication systems; this approach is aligned with the vision of integrated CNS;

 (2)    Provide additional features to increase the robustness against external intentional or unintentional threats/attacks to the EGNOS navigation service, for instance by adding authentication to GNSS signals or ad hoc features at antenna and receiver level;

 (3)    Enhance the navigation, positioning and/or timing performance provided at user level, for instance by improving the vertical position accuracy and the time-to-alert to enable supporting Cat-II approach procedures.

The aims are to analyse and define the reasons motivating evolutions along those three axes beyond 2025, determine constraints and pre-requisites, and assess the added value to end users. The analysis shall consider each area separately and determine under what condition it would be beneficial for the programme to implement these services. The analysis shall focus on:

(1)    Identifying user requirements for each of these new services and how they translate into service requirements for EGNOS;

 (2)    Defining the associated regulatory constraints and safety analyses required before the service can be implemented operationally;

(3)    Analysing the added value for aviation end users and defining how the service could be provided, to enable a programmatic decision on which service should be implemented as a priority.

The study will be fully financed by the European Commission under the Horizon 2020 framework programme for research and innovation, within the budget allocated to the evolution of the EGNOS mission. The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is in charge of the technical supervision of the project on behalf of the European Commission.

More information about the invitation to tender can be found here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Be part of the EGNOS aviation services evolution

Be part of the EGNOS aviation services evolution

6.10.2017 12:15  
Published: 
06 October 2017

The European Commission (EC), Directorate-General for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs, is defining the roadmap for the evolution of the EGNOS programme beyond the EGNOS Service Releases of EGNOS V3 currently defined. Evolutions shall support the implementation of safer and more efficient aviation operations. In this sense, further evolutions of EGNOS services for aviation safety beyond 2025 could take any of the following three directions, either:

  • (1)    Enlarge the provision of EGNOS services to Communication Navigation Surveillance (CNS) and Air Traffic Management (ATM) beyond navigation, notably to address surveillance (ADS-B) and possibly support timing services for communication systems; this approach is aligned with the vision of integrated CNS;
  • (2)    Provide additional features to increase the robustness against external intentional or unintentional threats/attacks to the EGNOS navigation service, for instance by adding authentication to GNSS signals or ad hoc features at antenna and receiver level;
  • (3)    Enhance the navigation, positioning and/or timing performance provided at user level, for instance by reducing the vertical position accuracy and the time-to-alert to enable supporting Cat-II approach procedures.

The aims are to analyse and define the reasons motivating evolutions along those three axes beyond 2025, determine constraints and pre-requisites, and assess the added value to end users. The analysis shall consider each area separately and determine under what condition it would be beneficial for the programme to implement these services. The analysis shall focus on:

  • (1)    Identifying user requirements for each of these new services and how they translate into service requirements for EGNOS;
  • (2)    Defining the associated regulatory constraints and safety analyses required before the service can be implemented operationally;
  • (3)    Analysing the added value for aviation end users and defining how the service could be provided, to enable a programmatic decision on which service should be implemented as a priority.

The study will be fully financed by the European Commission under the Horizon 2020 framework programme for research and innovation, within the budget allocated to the evolution of the EGNOS mission. The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is in charge of the technical supervision of the project on behalf of the European Commission.

More information about the ITT can be found here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Be part of the EGNOS aviation services evolution

Be part of the EGNOS aviation services evolution

6.10.2017 12:15  
Published: 
06 October 2017

The European Commission (EC), Directorate-General for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs, is defining the roadmap for the evolution of the EGNOS programme beyond the EGNOS Service Releases of EGNOS V3 currently defined. Evolutions shall support the implementation of safer and more efficient aviation operations. In this sense, further evolutions of EGNOS services for aviation safety beyond 2025 could take any of the following three directions, either:

(1)    Enlarge the provision of EGNOS services to Communication Navigation Surveillance (CNS) and Air Traffic Management (ATM) beyond navigation, notably to address surveillance (ADS-B) and possibly support timing services for communication systems; this approach is aligned with the vision of integrated CNS;

 (2)    Provide additional features to increase the robustness against external intentional or unintentional threats/attacks to the EGNOS navigation service, for instance by adding authentication to GNSS signals or ad hoc features at antenna and receiver level;

 (3)    Enhance the navigation, positioning and/or timing performance provided at user level, for instance by reducing the vertical position accuracy and the time-to-alert to enable supporting Cat-II approach procedures.

The aims are to analyse and define the reasons motivating evolutions along those three axes beyond 2025, determine constraints and pre-requisites, and assess the added value to end users. The analysis shall consider each area separately and determine under what condition it would be beneficial for the programme to implement these services. The analysis shall focus on:

(1)    Identifying user requirements for each of these new services and how they translate into service requirements for EGNOS;

 (2)    Defining the associated regulatory constraints and safety analyses required before the service can be implemented operationally;

(3)    Analysing the added value for aviation end users and defining how the service could be provided, to enable a programmatic decision on which service should be implemented as a priority.

The study will be fully financed by the European Commission under the Horizon 2020 framework programme for research and innovation, within the budget allocated to the evolution of the EGNOS mission. The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is in charge of the technical supervision of the project on behalf of the European Commission.

More information about the invitation to tender can be found here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Be part of the EGNOS aviation services evolution

Be part of the EGNOS aviation services evolution

6.10.2017 12:15  
Published: 
06 October 2017

The European Commission (EC), Directorate-General for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs, is defining the roadmap for the evolution of the EGNOS programme beyond the EGNOS Service Releases of EGNOS V3 currently defined. Evolutions shall support the implementation of safer and more efficient aviation operations. In this sense, further evolutions of EGNOS services for aviation safety beyond 2025 could take any of the following three directions, either:

(1)    Enlarge the provision of EGNOS services to Communication Navigation Surveillance (CNS) and Air Traffic Management (ATM) beyond navigation, notably to address surveillance (ADS-B) and possibly support timing services for communication systems; this approach is aligned with the vision of integrated CNS;

 (2)    Provide additional features to increase the robustness against external intentional or unintentional threats/attacks to the EGNOS navigation service, for instance by adding authentication to GNSS signals or ad hoc features at antenna and receiver level;

 (3)    Enhance the navigation, positioning and/or timing performance provided at user level, for instance by improving the vertical position accuracy and the time-to-alert to enable supporting Cat-II approach procedures.

The aims are to analyse and define the reasons motivating evolutions along those three axes beyond 2025, determine constraints and pre-requisites, and assess the added value to end users. The analysis shall consider each area separately and determine under what condition it would be beneficial for the programme to implement these services. The analysis shall focus on:

(1)    Identifying user requirements for each of these new services and how they translate into service requirements for EGNOS;

 (2)    Defining the associated regulatory constraints and safety analyses required before the service can be implemented operationally;

(3)    Analysing the added value for aviation end users and defining how the service could be provided, to enable a programmatic decision on which service should be implemented as a priority.

The study will be fully financed by the European Commission under the Horizon 2020 framework programme for research and innovation, within the budget allocated to the evolution of the EGNOS mission. The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is in charge of the technical supervision of the project on behalf of the European Commission.

More information about the invitation to tender can be found here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Be part of the EGNOS aviation services evolution

Be part of the EGNOS aviation services evolution

6.10.2017 12:15  
Published: 
06 October 2017

The European Commission (EC), Directorate-General for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs, is defining the roadmap for the evolution of the EGNOS programme beyond the EGNOS Service Releases of EGNOS V3 currently defined. Evolutions shall support the implementation of safer and more efficient aviation operations. In this sense, further evolutions of EGNOS services for aviation safety beyond 2025 could take any of the following three directions, either:

(1)    Enlarge the provision of EGNOS services to Communication Navigation Surveillance (CNS) and Air Traffic Management (ATM) beyond navigation, notably to address surveillance (ADS-B) and possibly support timing services for communication systems; this approach is aligned with the vision of integrated CNS;

 (2)    Provide additional features to increase the robustness against external intentional or unintentional threats/attacks to the EGNOS navigation service, for instance by adding authentication to GNSS signals or ad hoc features at antenna and receiver level;

 (3)    Enhance the navigation, positioning and/or timing performance provided at user level, for instance by improving the vertical position accuracy and the time-to-alert to enable supporting Cat-II approach procedures.

The aims are to analyse and define the reasons motivating evolutions along those three axes beyond 2025, determine constraints and pre-requisites, and assess the added value to end users. The analysis shall consider each area separately and determine under what condition it would be beneficial for the programme to implement these services. The analysis shall focus on:

(1)    Identifying user requirements for each of these new services and how they translate into service requirements for EGNOS;

 (2)    Defining the associated regulatory constraints and safety analyses required before the service can be implemented operationally;

(3)    Analysing the added value for aviation end users and defining how the service could be provided, to enable a programmatic decision on which service should be implemented as a priority.

The study will be fully financed by the European Commission under the Horizon 2020 framework programme for research and innovation, within the budget allocated to the evolution of the EGNOS mission. The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is in charge of the technical supervision of the project on behalf of the European Commission.

More information about the invitation to tender can be found here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Be part of the EGNOS aviation services evolution

Time is of the essence

5.10.2017 10:23  
Published: 
05 October 2017

To identify timing service needs that are not yet being met by the EGNSS basic time service, the ‘DEMonstrator of EGNSS services based on Time Reference Architecture’ (DEMETRA) project developed a prototype of an EGNSS-based time disseminator that provides time certification, redundancy, resilience, integrity, and improved accuracy, while validating the concept of ‘time as a service’.

The overarching goal of the DEMETRA project was to promote the use of EGNSS (EGNOS and Galileo) by enhancing and augmenting its timing service characteristics. To ensure that the needs of timing and synchronisation users were incorporated into the project design, the developers engaged with these end-users to design a system to demonstrate new or advanced timing services based on a common infrastructure that is scalable, robust, and continuously monitored.

Nine different time services were developed and integrated in the demonstrator, with varying degrees of technical and commercial maturity, based on the European GNSS basic timing service, which was complemented by other independent time transfer technologies. The services tested were:

  1. Time Broadcasting over TV/Radio Links;
  2. Certified Trusted Time Distribution using the Network Time Protocol (NTP);
  3. Time & Frequency Distribution over Optical Link;
  4. Time & Frequency Distribution via GEO Satellite;
  5. User GNSS Receiver Calibration;
  6. Certified Time Steering;
  7. Time Monitoring and Steering;
  8. Time Integrity; and an
  9. All-in-one Time Synchronisation Solution.

These services could become the basis for European timing standards, making timing of critical European infrastructure independent from GPS and fostering the dissemination of EGNSS-based common standardised time services throughout Europe.

Watch this: DEMETRA: Time as a Service

Main features

The project demonstrated the feasibility of delivering early EGNSS timing services to end users by utilising an operational prototype of a Galileo Time Services Provider (TSP) which could provide timing products to the Galileo system while also providing additional time services to other external customers.

The demonstrator was built around the concept of a common core infrastructure hosting advanced time services and delivering common services. These include time services monitoring, reference time, managing a centralised TSP database, and offering public and private web services such as the provision of TSP information for the general public and usage data and KPI for subscribed users. The demonstrator was deployed as an open and scalable architecture with common interfaces, making it easier to integrate new time services in the future.

This allows service developers to focus on performance at user level.

Galileo Time Services Provider

An eye on the market

There is significant untapped potential on the market for timing services, with some users already requiring these services and others about to reach a maturity level at which they will require them in the near future. The project conducted a Timing Service User Needs Analysis to identify the timing needs of end-users in market sectors as diverse as agriculture, energy, finance, media, science, surveying, telecommunications and transport.

This analysis concluded that the finance, energy and telecommunications markets have the greatest short-term commercial potential for the delivery of timing services. Synchronisation monitoring, accuracy, certification and availability were found to be the key areas where timing services are required in these three markets.

Each market is already served by existing solutions, but these mainly concentrate on the delivery of accurate time and focus less on monitoring, certification of time sources and availability of time. To ensure that the needs of the market are met, specific business plans will be rolled out for each DEMETRA service. These will vary considerably based on the maturity of the service and the applicability of the service to each market.

For more information, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Services tested by DEMETRA could foster the dissemination of EGNSS-based common standardised time services throughout Europe

Time is of the essence

5.10.2017 10:23  
Published: 
05 October 2017

To identify timing service needs that are not yet being met by the EGNSS basic time service, the ‘DEMonstrator of EGNSS services based on Time Reference Architecture’ (DEMETRA) project developed a prototype of an EGNSS-based time disseminator that provides time certification, redundancy, resilience, integrity, and improved accuracy, while validating the concept of ‘time as a service’.

The overarching goal of the DEMETRA project was to promote the use of EGNSS (EGNOS and Galileo) by enhancing and augmenting its timing service characteristics. To ensure that the needs of timing and synchronisation users were incorporated into the project design, the developers engaged with these end-users to design a system to demonstrate new or advanced timing services based on a common infrastructure that is scalable, robust, and continuously monitored.

Nine different time services were developed and integrated in the demonstrator, with varying degrees of technical and commercial maturity, based on the European GNSS basic timing service, which was complemented by other independent time transfer technologies. The services tested were:

  1. Time Broadcasting over TV/Radio Links;
  2. Certified Trusted Time Distribution using the Network Time Protocol (NTP);
  3. Time & Frequency Distribution over Optical Link;
  4. Time & Frequency Distribution via GEO Satellite;
  5. User GNSS Receiver Calibration;
  6. Certified Time Steering;
  7. Time Monitoring and Steering;
  8. Time Integrity; and an
  9. All-in-one Time Synchronisation Solution.

These services could become the basis for European timing standards, making timing of critical European infrastructure independent from GPS and fostering the dissemination of EGNSS-based common standardised time services throughout Europe.

Watch this: DEMETRA: Time as a Service

Main features

The project demonstrated the feasibility of delivering early EGNSS timing services to end users by utilising an operational prototype of a Galileo Time Services Provider (TSP) which could provide timing products to the Galileo system while also providing additional time services to other external customers.

The demonstrator was built around the concept of a common core infrastructure hosting advanced time services and delivering common services. These include time services monitoring, reference time, managing a centralised TSP database, and offering public and private web services such as the provision of TSP information for the general public and usage data and KPI for subscribed users. The demonstrator was deployed as an open and scalable architecture with common interfaces, making it easier to integrate new time services in the future.

This allows service developers to focus on performance at user level.

Galileo Time Services Provider

An eye on the market

There is significant untapped potential on the market for timing services, with some users already requiring these services and others about to reach a maturity level at which they will require them in the near future. The project conducted a Timing Service User Needs Analysis to identify the timing needs of end-users in market sectors as diverse as agriculture, energy, finance, media, science, surveying, telecommunications and transport.

This analysis concluded that the finance, energy and telecommunications markets have the greatest short-term commercial potential for the delivery of timing services. Synchronisation monitoring, accuracy, certification and availability were found to be the key areas where timing services are required in these three markets.

Each market is already served by existing solutions, but these mainly concentrate on the delivery of accurate time and focus less on monitoring, certification of time sources and availability of time. To ensure that the needs of the market are met, specific business plans will be rolled out for each DEMETRA service. These will vary considerably based on the maturity of the service and the applicability of the service to each market.

For more information, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Services tested by DEMETRA could foster the dissemination of EGNSS-based common standardised time services throughout Europe

Time is of the essence

5.10.2017 10:23  
Published: 
05 October 2017

To identify timing service needs that are not yet being met by the EGNSS basic time service, the ‘DEMonstrator of EGNSS services based on Time Reference Architecture’ (DEMETRA) project developed a prototype of an EGNSS-based time disseminator that provides time certification, redundancy, resilience, integrity, and improved accuracy, while validating the concept of ‘time as a service’.

The overarching goal of the DEMETRA project was to promote the use of EGNSS (EGNOS and Galileo) by enhancing and augmenting its timing service characteristics. To ensure that the needs of timing and synchronisation users were incorporated into the project design, the developers engaged with these end-users to design a system to demonstrate new or advanced timing services based on a common infrastructure that is scalable, robust, and continuously monitored.

Nine different time services were developed and integrated in the demonstrator, with varying degrees of technical and commercial maturity, based on the European GNSS basic timing service, which was complemented by other independent time transfer technologies. The services tested were:

  1. Time Broadcasting over TV/Radio Links;
  2. Certified Trusted Time Distribution using the Network Time Protocol (NTP);
  3. Time & Frequency Distribution over Optical Link;
  4. Time & Frequency Distribution via GEO Satellite;
  5. User GNSS Receiver Calibration;
  6. Certified Time Steering;
  7. Time Monitoring and Steering;
  8. Time Integrity; and an
  9. All-in-one Time Synchronisation Solution.

These services could become the basis for European timing standards, making timing of critical European infrastructure independent from GPS and fostering the dissemination of EGNSS-based common standardised time services throughout Europe.

Watch this: DEMETRA: Time as a Service

Main features

The project demonstrated the feasibility of delivering early EGNSS timing services to end users by utilising an operational prototype of a Galileo Time Services Provider (TSP) which could provide timing products to the Galileo system while also providing additional time services to other external customers.

The demonstrator was built around the concept of a common core infrastructure hosting advanced time services and delivering common services. These include time services monitoring, reference time, managing a centralised TSP database, and offering public and private web services such as the provision of TSP information for the general public and usage data and KPI for subscribed users. The demonstrator was deployed as an open and scalable architecture with common interfaces, making it easier to integrate new time services in the future.

This allows service developers to focus on performance at user level.

Galileo Time Services Provider

An eye on the market

There is significant untapped potential on the market for timing services, with some users already requiring these services and others about to reach a maturity level at which they will require them in the near future. The project conducted a Timing Service User Needs Analysis to identify the timing needs of end-users in market sectors as diverse as agriculture, energy, finance, media, science, surveying, telecommunications and transport.

This analysis concluded that the finance, energy and telecommunications markets have the greatest short-term commercial potential for the delivery of timing services. Synchronisation monitoring, accuracy, certification and availability were found to be the key areas where timing services are required in these three markets.

Each market is already served by existing solutions, but these mainly concentrate on the delivery of accurate time and focus less on monitoring, certification of time sources and availability of time. To ensure that the needs of the market are met, specific business plans will be rolled out for each DEMETRA service. These will vary considerably based on the maturity of the service and the applicability of the service to each market.

For more information, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Services tested by DEMETRA could foster the dissemination of EGNSS-based common standardised time services throughout Europe

Time is of the essence

5.10.2017 10:23  
Published: 
05 October 2017

To identify timing service needs that are not yet being met by the EGNSS basic time service, the ‘DEMonstrator of EGNSS services based on Time Reference Architecture’ (DEMETRA) project developed a prototype of an EGNSS-based time disseminator that provides time certification, redundancy, resilience, integrity, and improved accuracy, while validating the concept of ‘time as a service’.

The overarching goal of the DEMETRA project was to promote the use of EGNSS (EGNOS and Galileo) by enhancing and augmenting its timing service characteristics. To ensure that the needs of timing and synchronisation users were incorporated into the project design, the developers engaged with these end-users to design a system to demonstrate new or advanced timing services based on a common infrastructure that is scalable, robust, and continuously monitored.

Nine different time services were developed and integrated in the demonstrator, with varying degrees of technical and commercial maturity, based on the European GNSS basic timing service, which was complemented by other independent time transfer technologies. The services tested were:

  1. Time Broadcasting over TV/Radio Links;
  2. Certified Trusted Time Distribution using the Network Time Protocol (NTP);
  3. Time & Frequency Distribution over Optical Link;
  4. Time & Frequency Distribution via GEO Satellite;
  5. User GNSS Receiver Calibration;
  6. Certified Time Steering;
  7. Time Monitoring and Steering;
  8. Time Integrity; and an
  9. All-in-one Time Synchronisation Solution.

These services could become the basis for European timing standards, making timing of critical European infrastructure independent from GPS and fostering the dissemination of EGNSS-based common standardised time services throughout Europe.

Watch this: DEMETRA: Time as a Service

Main features

The project demonstrated the feasibility of delivering early EGNSS timing services to end users by utilising an operational prototype of a Galileo Time Services Provider (TSP) which could provide timing products to the Galileo system while also providing additional time services to other external customers.

The demonstrator was built around the concept of a common core infrastructure hosting advanced time services and delivering common services. These include time services monitoring, reference time, managing a centralised TSP database, and offering public and private web services such as the provision of TSP information for the general public and usage data and KPI for subscribed users. The demonstrator was deployed as an open and scalable architecture with common interfaces, making it easier to integrate new time services in the future.

This allows service developers to focus on performance at user level.

Galileo Time Services Provider

An eye on the market

There is significant untapped potential on the market for timing services, with some users already requiring these services and others about to reach a maturity level at which they will require them in the near future. The project conducted a Timing Service User Needs Analysis to identify the timing needs of end-users in market sectors as diverse as agriculture, energy, finance, media, science, surveying, telecommunications and transport.

This analysis concluded that the finance, energy and telecommunications markets have the greatest short-term commercial potential for the delivery of timing services. Synchronisation monitoring, accuracy, certification and availability were found to be the key areas where timing services are required in these three markets.

Each market is already served by existing solutions, but these mainly concentrate on the delivery of accurate time and focus less on monitoring, certification of time sources and availability of time. To ensure that the needs of the market are met, specific business plans will be rolled out for each DEMETRA service. These will vary considerably based on the maturity of the service and the applicability of the service to each market.

For more information, click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Services tested by DEMETRA could foster the dissemination of EGNSS-based common standardised time services throughout Europe

Are you an EGNOS user? We want to hear from you!

3.10.2017 14:13  
The GSA uses feedback from users to improve EGNOS service delivery.
Published: 
03 October 2017

With the 2017 EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) aims to gain a clearer picture of the requirements of EGNOS users so it can improve EGNOS service delivery.

The GSA, along with the European Satellite Services Provider (ESSP), has launched the 2017 edition of its EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey. In conducting this survey, the GSA and ESSP aim to gain a better understanding of EGNOS’ value to users, with a view to providing better customer service.

The survey will be open to EGNOS users until November 30 and only takes a few moments to complete.

You can access the survey here.

The survey covers all market segments and services, including the Open Service, the Safety of Life Service and the EGNOS Data Access Service (EDAS). It also assesses the ESSP’s management of EGNOS User Support Services. All EGNOS users are strongly encouraged to participate, regardless of the market segment in which they operate.

The 2016 EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey showed a positive trend, with user satisfaction increased substantially compared with 2015. These results will be presented in full at the EGNOS Workshop, which is to be held in Athens, Greece, on 3-4 October, 2017.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GSA uses feedback from users to improve EGNOS service delivery.

Are you an EGNOS user? We want to hear from you!

3.10.2017 14:13  
Published: 
03 October 2017

With the 2017 EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) aims to gain a clearer picture of the requirements of EGNOS users so it can improve EGNOS service delivery.

The GSA, along with the European Satellite Services Provider (ESSP), has launched the 2017 edition of its EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey. In conducting this survey, the GSA and ESSP aim to gain a better understanding of EGNOS’ value to users, with a view to providing better customer service.

The survey will be open to EGNOS users until December 1 and only takes a few moments to complete.

You can access the survey here.

The survey covers all market segments and services, including the Open Service, the Safety of Life Service and the EGNOS Data Access Service (EDAS). It also assesses the ESSP’s management of EGNOS User Support Services. All EGNOS users are strongly encouraged to participate, regardless of the market segment in which they operate.

The 2016 EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey showed a positive trend, with user satisfaction increased substantially compared with 2015. These results will be presented in full at the EGNOS Workshop, which is to be held in Athens, Greece, on 3-4 October, 2017.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GSA uses feedback from users to improve EGNOS service delivery.

Are you an EGNOS user? We want to hear from you!

3.10.2017 14:13  
Published: 
03 October 2017

With the 2017 EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) aims to gain a clearer picture of the requirements of EGNOS users so it can improve EGNOS service delivery.

The GSA, along with the European Satellite Services Provider (ESSP), has launched the 2017 edition of its EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey. In conducting this survey, the GSA and ESSP aim to gain a better understanding of EGNOS’ value to users, with a view to providing better customer service.

The survey will be open to EGNOS users until November 30 and only takes a few moments to complete.

You can access the survey here.

The survey covers all market segments and services, including the Open Service, the Safety of Life Service and the EGNOS Data Access Service (EDAS). It also assesses the ESSP’s management of EGNOS User Support Services. All EGNOS users are strongly encouraged to participate, regardless of the market segment in which they operate.

The 2016 EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey showed a positive trend, with user satisfaction increased substantially compared with 2015. These results will be presented in full at the EGNOS Workshop, which is to be held in Athens, Greece, on 3-4 October, 2017.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GSA uses feedback from users to improve EGNOS service delivery.

Are you an EGNOS user? We want to hear from you!

3.10.2017 14:13  
Published: 
03 October 2017

With the 2017 EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) aims to gain a clearer picture of the requirements of EGNOS users so it can improve EGNOS service delivery.

The GSA, along with the European Satellite Services Provider (ESSP), has launched the 2017 edition of its EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey. In conducting this survey, the GSA and ESSP aim to gain a better understanding of EGNOS’ value to users, with a view to providing better customer service.

The survey will be open to EGNOS users until December 1 and only takes a few moments to complete.

You can access the survey here.

The survey covers all market segments and services, including the Open Service, the Safety of Life Service and the EGNOS Data Access Service (EDAS). It also assesses the ESSP’s management of EGNOS User Support Services. All EGNOS users are strongly encouraged to participate, regardless of the market segment in which they operate.

The 2016 EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey showed a positive trend, with user satisfaction increased substantially compared with 2015. These results will be presented in full at the EGNOS Workshop, which is to be held in Athens, Greece, on 3-4 October, 2017.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GSA uses feedback from users to improve EGNOS service delivery.

Are you an EGNOS user? We want to hear from you!

3.10.2017 14:13  
Published: 
03 October 2017

With the 2017 EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) aims to gain a clearer picture of the requirements of EGNOS users so it can improve EGNOS service delivery.

The GSA, along with the European Satellite Services Provider (ESSP), has launched the 2017 edition of its EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey. In conducting this survey, the GSA and ESSP aim to gain a better understanding of EGNOS’ value to users, with a view to providing better customer service.

The survey will be open to EGNOS users until December 1 and only takes a few moments to complete.

You can access the survey here.

The survey covers all market segments and services, including the Open Service, the Safety of Life Service and the EGNOS Data Access Service (EDAS). It also assesses the ESSP’s management of EGNOS User Support Services. All EGNOS users are strongly encouraged to participate, regardless of the market segment in which they operate.

The 2016 EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey showed a positive trend, with user satisfaction increased substantially compared with 2015. These results will be presented in full at the EGNOS Workshop, which is to be held in Athens, Greece, on 3-4 October, 2017.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GSA uses feedback from users to improve EGNOS service delivery.

Are you an EGNOS user? We want to hear from you!

3.10.2017 14:13  
Published: 
03 October 2017

With the 2017 EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) aims to gain a clearer picture of the requirements of EGNOS users so it can improve EGNOS service delivery.

The GSA, along with the European Satellite Services Provider (ESSP), has launched the 2017 edition of its EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey. In conducting this survey, the GSA and ESSP aim to gain a better understanding of EGNOS’ value to users, with a view to providing better customer service.

The survey will be open to EGNOS users until December 1 and only takes a few moments to complete.

You can access the survey here.

The survey covers all market segments and services, including the Open Service, the Safety of Life Service and the EGNOS Data Access Service (EDAS). It also assesses the ESSP’s management of EGNOS User Support Services. All EGNOS users are strongly encouraged to participate, regardless of the market segment in which they operate.

The 2016 EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey showed a positive trend, with user satisfaction increased substantially compared with 2015. These results will be presented in full at the EGNOS Workshop, which is to be held in Athens, Greece, on 3-4 October, 2017.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GSA uses feedback from users to improve EGNOS service delivery.

Are you an EGNOS user? We want to hear from you!

3.10.2017 14:13  
The GSA uses feedback from users to improve EGNOS service delivery.
Published: 
03 October 2017

With the 2017 EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) aims to gain a clearer picture of the requirements of EGNOS users so it can improve EGNOS service delivery.

The GSA, along with the European Satellite Services Provider (ESSP), has launched the 2017 edition of its EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey. In conducting this survey, the GSA and ESSP aim to gain a better understanding of EGNOS’ value to users, with a view to providing better customer service.

The survey will be open to EGNOS users until December 1 and only takes a few moments to complete.

You can access the survey here.

The survey covers all market segments and services, including the Open Service, the Safety of Life Service and the EGNOS Data Access Service (EDAS). It also assesses the ESSP’s management of EGNOS User Support Services. All EGNOS users are strongly encouraged to participate, regardless of the market segment in which they operate.

The 2016 EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey showed a positive trend, with user satisfaction increased substantially compared with 2015. These results will be presented in full at the EGNOS Workshop, which is to be held in Athens, Greece, on 3-4 October, 2017.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GSA uses feedback from users to improve EGNOS service delivery.

Are you an EGNOS user? We want to hear from you!

3.10.2017 14:13  
Published: 
03 October 2017

With the 2017 EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) aims to gain a clearer picture of the requirements of EGNOS users so it can improve EGNOS service delivery.

The GSA, along with the European Satellite Services Provider (ESSP), has launched the 2017 edition of its EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey. In conducting this survey, the GSA and ESSP aim to gain a better understanding of EGNOS’ value to users, with a view to providing better customer service.

The survey will be open to EGNOS users until November 30 and only takes a few moments to complete.

You can access the survey here.

The survey covers all market segments and services, including the Open Service, the Safety of Life Service and the EGNOS Data Access Service (EDAS). It also assesses the ESSP’s management of EGNOS User Support Services. All EGNOS users are strongly encouraged to participate, regardless of the market segment in which they operate.

The 2016 EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey showed a positive trend, with user satisfaction increased substantially compared with 2015. These results will be presented in full at the EGNOS Workshop, which is to be held in Athens, Greece, on 3-4 October, 2017.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GSA uses feedback from users to improve EGNOS service delivery.

Are you an EGNOS user? We want to hear from you!

3.10.2017 14:13  
The GSA uses feedback from users to improve EGNOS service delivery.
Published: 
03 October 2017

With the 2017 EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) aims to gain a clearer picture of the requirements of EGNOS users so it can improve EGNOS service delivery.

The GSA, along with the European Satellite Services Provider (ESSP), has launched the 2017 edition of its EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey. In conducting this survey, the GSA and ESSP aim to gain a better understanding of EGNOS’ value to users, with a view to providing better customer service.

The survey will be open to EGNOS users until November 30 and only takes a few moments to complete.

You can access the survey here.

The survey covers all market segments and services, including the Open Service, the Safety of Life Service and the EGNOS Data Access Service (EDAS). It also assesses the ESSP’s management of EGNOS User Support Services. All EGNOS users are strongly encouraged to participate, regardless of the market segment in which they operate.

The 2016 EGNOS User Satisfaction Survey showed a positive trend, with user satisfaction increased substantially compared with 2015. These results will be presented in full at the EGNOS Workshop, which is to be held in Athens, Greece, on 3-4 October, 2017.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The GSA uses feedback from users to improve EGNOS service delivery.

Expanding GNSS performance with assistance data

27.9.2017 10:10  
This figure shows the improvement of the location service in terms of accuracy and availability that ELAASTIC technology provides in difficult environments, here in downtown Toulouse, reaching a reliable 1.5-meter accuracy.
Published: 
27 September 2017

 

Galileo’s success will depend in a large part on its penetration of the LBS and Machine-to-Machine (M2M) markets. However, as the LBS market is already dominated by such heavy hitters as Google and Apple, the European GNSS industry is turning its focus to building a competitive M2M market founded on EU-based location enablers (i.e., EGNOS and Galileo). Machine-to-machine refers to the direct communication between devices using any communications channel, including wired and wireless.

“Having the knowledge of a device’s location is becoming increasing crucial in today’s high-tech world,” says ELAASTIC Project Coordinator Yves Capelle. “As smartphones, vehicles, mobile assets become location aware, a whole new world of opportunities opens up, from urban maintenance, to logistics and location-based marketing.”

Also read: Galileo set to power LBS applications in Europe

According to Capelle, this increased reliance on location has created a need for these devices to provide a consistent and reliable location experience. “Developing applications by themselves will fail to carve out EGNSS’ market share,” he says. “To succeed, we first needed to develop the proper location enablers by combining location technologies and integrating EGNSS’ added value.”

How it works

The GSA-funded H2020 ELAASTIC project delivers exactly this type of complete integration of Location as a Service (LaaS). Now, when a device equipped with ELAASTIC technology needs to compute its location, it sends a request to the ELAASTIC server in order to get GNSS assistance data. The server elaborates the set of assistance data corresponding to the request and then sends it back to the device.

Also read: European GNSS at the heart of Europe’s industrial agenda

Capelle adds that if the device also sends the identification of the Wi-Fi access points (APs), then the ELAASTIC server can send back the Wi-Fi AP’s position. “This allows the ELAASTIC software within the device to combine both GNSS and Wi-Fi measurements, thus enhancing the computation in terms of accuracy and availability,” he adds. As the LaaS server is connected to an EGNOS receiver, it also provides differential corrections for GPS.

Furthermore, ELAASTIC technology provides specific algorithms for Galileo-enabled chipsets, allowing them to get a better accuracy on location and better sensitivity on tracking. By taking advantage of Galileo signal modulations, these specific algorithms provide enhanced resilience to multi-path effects and better integrity.

Empowering high-performance applications  

With ELAASTIC, in at least 90% of cases, the position accuracy of a device is around 1.5 meters, and the position is available nearly everywhere in the urban environment (see graph below). “This opens the door to a number of user applications that require a very high level of performance,” says Capelle. These applications range from urban maintenance to guidance of visually impaired people and Advanced Driver Assistance Service for cars (ADAS) – to name only a few of the many benefits enabled by the ELAASTIC project. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Expanding GNSS performance with assistance data

27.9.2017 10:10  
This figure shows the improvement of the location service in terms of accuracy and availability that ELAASTIC technology provides in difficult environments, here in downtown Toulouse, reaching a reliable 1.5-meter accuracy.
Published: 
27 September 2017

 

Galileo’s success will depend in a large part on its penetration of the LBS and Machine-to-Machine (M2M) markets. However, as the LBS market is already dominated by such heavy hitters as Google and Apple, the European GNSS industry is turning its focus to building a competitive M2M market founded on EU-based location enablers (i.e., EGNOS and Galileo). Machine-to-machine refers to the direct communication between devices using any communications channel, including wired and wireless.

“Having the knowledge of a device’s location is becoming increasing crucial in today’s high-tech world,” says ELAASTIC Project Coordinator Yves Capelle. “As smartphones, vehicles, mobile assets become location aware, a whole new world of opportunities opens up, from urban maintenance, to logistics and location-based marketing.”

Also read: Galileo set to power LBS applications in Europe

According to Capelle, this increased reliance on location has created a need for these devices to provide a consistent and reliable location experience. “Developing applications by themselves will fail to carve out EGNSS’ market share,” he says. “To succeed, we first needed to develop the proper location enablers by combining location technologies and integrating EGNSS’ added value.”

How it works

The GSA-funded H2020 ELAASTIC project delivers exactly this type of complete integration of Location as a Service (LaaS). Now, when a device equipped with ELAASTIC technology needs to compute its location, it sends a request to the ELAASTIC server in order to get GNSS assistance data. The server elaborates the set of assistance data corresponding to the request and then sends it back to the device.

Also read: European GNSS at the heart of Europe’s industrial agenda

Capelle adds that if the device also sends the identification of the Wi-Fi access points (APs), then the ELAASTIC server can send back the Wi-Fi AP’s position. “This allows the ELAASTIC software within the device to combine both GNSS and Wi-Fi measurements, thus enhancing the computation in terms of accuracy and availability,” he adds. As the LaaS server is connected to an EGNOS receiver, it also provides differential corrections for GPS.

Furthermore, ELAASTIC technology provides specific algorithms for Galileo-enabled chipsets, allowing them to get a better accuracy on location and better sensitivity on tracking. By taking advantage of Galileo signal modulations, these specific algorithms provide enhanced resilience to multi-path effects and better integrity.

Empowering high-performance applications  

With ELAASTIC, in at least 90% of cases, the position accuracy of a device is around 1.5 meters, and the position is available nearly everywhere in the urban environment (see graph below). “This opens the door to a number of user applications that require a very high level of performance,” says Capelle. These applications range from urban maintenance to guidance of visually impaired people and Advanced Driver Assistance Service for cars (ADAS) – to name only a few of the many benefits enabled by the ELAASTIC project. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Expanding GNSS performance with assistance data

27.9.2017 10:10  
This figure shows the improvement of the location service in terms of accuracy and availability that ELAASTIC technology provides in difficult environments, here in downtown Toulouse, reaching a reliable 1.5-meter accuracy.
Published: 
27 September 2017

 

Galileo’s success will depend in a large part on its penetration of the LBS and Machine-to-Machine (M2M) markets. However, as the LBS market is already dominated by such heavy hitters as Google and Apple, the European GNSS industry is turning its focus to building a competitive M2M market founded on EU-based location enablers (i.e., EGNOS and Galileo). Machine-to-machine refers to the direct communication between devices using any communications channel, including wired and wireless.

“Having the knowledge of a device’s location is becoming increasing crucial in today’s high-tech world,” says ELAASTIC Project Coordinator Yves Capelle. “As smartphones, vehicles, mobile assets become location aware, a whole new world of opportunities opens up, from urban maintenance, to logistics and location-based marketing.”

Also read: Galileo set to power LBS applications in Europe

According to Capelle, this increased reliance on location has created a need for these devices to provide a consistent and reliable location experience. “Developing applications by themselves will fail to carve out EGNSS’ market share,” he says. “To succeed, we first needed to develop the proper location enablers by combining location technologies and integrating EGNSS’ added value.”

How it works

The GSA-funded H2020 ELAASTIC project delivers exactly this type of complete integration of Location as a Service (LaaS). Now, when a device equipped with ELAASTIC technology needs to compute its location, it sends a request to the ELAASTIC server in order to get GNSS assistance data. The server elaborates the set of assistance data corresponding to the request and then sends it back to the device.

Also read: European GNSS at the heart of Europe’s industrial agenda

Capelle adds that if the device also sends the identification of the Wi-Fi access points (APs), then the ELAASTIC server can send back the Wi-Fi AP’s position. “This allows the ELAASTIC software within the device to combine both GNSS and Wi-Fi measurements, thus enhancing the computation in terms of accuracy and availability,” he adds. As the LaaS server is connected to an EGNOS receiver, it also provides differential corrections for GPS.

Furthermore, ELAASTIC technology provides specific algorithms for Galileo-enabled chipsets, allowing them to get a better accuracy on location and better sensitivity on tracking. By taking advantage of Galileo signal modulations, these specific algorithms provide enhanced resilience to multi-path effects and better integrity.

Empowering high-performance applications  

With ELAASTIC, in at least 90% of cases, the position accuracy of a device is around 1.5 meters, and the position is available nearly everywhere in the urban environment (see graph below). “This opens the door to a number of user applications that require a very high level of performance,” says Capelle. These applications range from urban maintenance to guidance of visually impaired people and Advanced Driver Assistance Service for cars (ADAS) – to name only a few of the many benefits enabled by the ELAASTIC project. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Expanding GNSS performance with assistance data

27.9.2017 10:10  
This figure shows the improvement of the location service in terms of accuracy and availability that ELAASTIC technology provides in difficult environments, here in downtown Toulouse, reaching a reliable 1.5-meter accuracy.
Published: 
27 September 2017

 

Galileo’s success will depend in a large part on its penetration of the LBS and Machine-to-Machine (M2M) markets. However, as the LBS market is already dominated by such heavy hitters as Google and Apple, the European GNSS industry is turning its focus to building a competitive M2M market founded on EU-based location enablers (i.e., EGNOS and Galileo). Machine-to-machine refers to the direct communication between devices using any communications channel, including wired and wireless.

“Having the knowledge of a device’s location is becoming increasing crucial in today’s high-tech world,” says ELAASTIC Project Coordinator Yves Capelle. “As smartphones, vehicles, mobile assets become location aware, a whole new world of opportunities opens up, from urban maintenance, to logistics and location-based marketing.”

Also read: Galileo set to power LBS applications in Europe

According to Capelle, this increased reliance on location has created a need for these devices to provide a consistent and reliable location experience. “Developing applications by themselves will fail to carve out EGNSS’ market share,” he says. “To succeed, we first needed to develop the proper location enablers by combining location technologies and integrating EGNSS’ added value.”

How it works

The GSA-funded H2020 ELAASTIC project delivers exactly this type of complete integration of Location as a Service (LaaS). Now, when a device equipped with ELAASTIC technology needs to compute its location, it sends a request to the ELAASTIC server in order to get GNSS assistance data. The server elaborates the set of assistance data corresponding to the request and then sends it back to the device.

Also read: European GNSS at the heart of Europe’s industrial agenda

Capelle adds that if the device also sends the identification of the Wi-Fi access points (APs), then the ELAASTIC server can send back the Wi-Fi AP’s position. “This allows the ELAASTIC software within the device to combine both GNSS and Wi-Fi measurements, thus enhancing the computation in terms of accuracy and availability,” he adds. As the LaaS server is connected to an EGNOS receiver, it also provides differential corrections for GPS.

Furthermore, ELAASTIC technology provides specific algorithms for Galileo-enabled chipsets, allowing them to get a better accuracy on location and better sensitivity on tracking. By taking advantage of Galileo signal modulations, these specific algorithms provide enhanced resilience to multi-path effects and better integrity.

Empowering high-performance applications  

With ELAASTIC, in at least 90% of cases, the position accuracy of a device is around 1.5 meters, and the position is available nearly everywhere in the urban environment (see graph below). “This opens the door to a number of user applications that require a very high level of performance,” says Capelle. These applications range from urban maintenance to guidance of visually impaired people and Advanced Driver Assistance Service for cars (ADAS) – to name only a few of the many benefits enabled by the ELAASTIC project. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Expanding GNSS performance with assistance data

27.9.2017 10:10  
This figure shows the improvement of the location service in terms of accuracy and availability that ELAASTIC technology provides in difficult environments, here in downtown Toulouse, reaching a reliable 1.5-meter accuracy.
Published: 
27 September 2017

 

Galileo’s success will depend in a large part on its penetration of the LBS and Machine-to-Machine (M2M) markets. However, as the LBS market is already dominated by such heavy hitters as Google and Apple, the European GNSS industry is turning its focus to building a competitive M2M market founded on EU-based location enablers (i.e., EGNOS and Galileo). Machine-to-machine refers to the direct communication between devices using any communications channel, including wired and wireless.

“Having the knowledge of a device’s location is becoming increasing crucial in today’s high-tech world,” says ELAASTIC Project Coordinator Yves Capelle. “As smartphones, vehicles, mobile assets become location aware, a whole new world of opportunities opens up, from urban maintenance, to logistics and location-based marketing.”

Also read: Galileo set to power LBS applications in Europe

According to Capelle, this increased reliance on location has created a need for these devices to provide a consistent and reliable location experience. “Developing applications by themselves will fail to carve out EGNSS’ market share,” he says. “To succeed, we first needed to develop the proper location enablers by combining location technologies and integrating EGNSS’ added value.”

How it works

The GSA-funded H2020 ELAASTIC project delivers exactly this type of complete integration of Location as a Service (LaaS). Now, when a device equipped with ELAASTIC technology needs to compute its location, it sends a request to the ELAASTIC server in order to get GNSS assistance data. The server elaborates the set of assistance data corresponding to the request and then sends it back to the device.

Also read: European GNSS at the heart of Europe’s industrial agenda

Capelle adds that if the device also sends the identification of the Wi-Fi access points (APs), then the ELAASTIC server can send back the Wi-Fi AP’s position. “This allows the ELAASTIC software within the device to combine both GNSS and Wi-Fi measurements, thus enhancing the computation in terms of accuracy and availability,” he adds. As the LaaS server is connected to an EGNOS receiver, it also provides differential corrections for GPS.

Furthermore, ELAASTIC technology provides specific algorithms for Galileo-enabled chipsets, allowing them to get a better accuracy on location and better sensitivity on tracking. By taking advantage of Galileo signal modulations, these specific algorithms provide enhanced resilience to multi-path effects and better integrity.

Empowering high-performance applications  

With ELAASTIC, in at least 90% of cases, the position accuracy of a device is around 1.5 meters, and the position is available nearly everywhere in the urban environment (see graph below). “This opens the door to a number of user applications that require a very high level of performance,” says Capelle. These applications range from urban maintenance to guidance of visually impaired people and Advanced Driver Assistance Service for cars (ADAS) – to name only a few of the many benefits enabled by the ELAASTIC project. 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

GNSS Experts to talk about the value of raw measurements at ION GNSS+ 2017

22.9.2017 9:46  
Join the GSA at ION GNSS+ 2017 for a special session on using GNSS raw measurements. The session will take place on Thursday September 28 from 2:00 – 2:45pm in Room C120-122.
Published: 
22 September 2017

Are GNSS raw measurements in consumer devices just a playground for scientists, or do they represent a real market opportunity? To find out, join the European GNSS Agency (GSA) and a panel of industry experts as they discuss the topic on 28 September at ION GNSS+ 2017.

With a smartphone featuring Android 7.0 (i.e., Nougat), users now have access to raw GNSS measurements. This feature opens the door to higher-accuracy and the development of algorithms once restricted to more advanced GNSS receivers. This new capability also allows users to fully benefit from the special features offered by Galileo, and to combine it with other constellations in the most efficient way.

Although Nougat makes accessing raw data easier, using it remains a challenge. In fact, its use remains largely limited to research centres, universities and GNSS experts – which raises the question: is there real market opportunity in GNSS raw measurements or is it simply a playground for scientists and experts?

White Paper on using GNSS raw measurements

To answer this question, the GSA launched the Raw Measurements Task Force. Comprised of GNSS experts, scientists and market players, the Task Force aims to foster a wider use of these raw measurements. Their White Paper, set to be published soon, will provide applica¬tion developers with a range of tools, including practical tips and innovative ideas on how to take full advantage of GNSS raw measurements.

Join us at ION GNSS+ 2017

Join the GSA and Frank van Diggelen (Google), Mark Dumville (NSL), Moises Navarro (Astrium) and Lukasz Bonenberg (University of Nottingham) for a preview of the White Paper and an interactive discussion on such topics as: 

  • Tips and innovative ideas on using GNSS raw measurements
  • Results from tests using raw measurements conducted by different experts
  • Advice on how to ensure the use of Galileo in smart¬phone applications
  • Expert insights on the challenges and opportunities of GNSS raw measurements

Moderated by Fiammetta Diani, GSA Deputy Head of Market Development, the session will take place on Thursday September 28 from 2:00 – 2:45pm in Room C120-122 during ION GNSS+ 2017, held in Portland, Oregon (USA). You can register for the event here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Join the GSA at ION GNSS+ 2017 for a special session on using GNSS raw measurements. The session will take place on Thursday September 28 from 2:00 – 2:45pm in Room C120-122.

GNSS Experts to talk about the value of raw measurements at ION GNSS+ 2017

22.9.2017 9:46  
Join the GSA at ION GNSS+ 2017 for a special session on using GNSS raw measurements. The session will take place on Thursday September 28 from 2:00 – 2:45pm in Room C120-122.
Published: 
22 September 2017

Are GNSS raw measurements in consumer devices just a playground for scientists, or do they represent a real market opportunity? To find out, join the European GNSS Agency (GSA) and a panel of industry experts as they discuss the topic on 28 September at ION GNSS+ 2017.

With a smartphone featuring Android 7.0 (i.e., Nougat), users now have access to raw GNSS measurements. This feature opens the door to higher-accuracy and the development of algorithms once restricted to more advanced GNSS receivers. This new capability also allows users to fully benefit from the special features offered by Galileo, and to combine it with other constellations in the most efficient way.

Although Nougat makes accessing raw data easier, using it remains a challenge. In fact, its use remains largely limited to research centres, universities and GNSS experts – which raises the question: is there real market opportunity in GNSS raw measurements or is it simply a playground for scientists and experts?

White Paper on using GNSS raw measurements

To answer this question, the GSA launched the Raw Measurements Task Force. Comprised of GNSS experts, scientists and market players, the Task Force aims to foster a wider use of these raw measurements. Their White Paper, set to be published soon, will provide application developers with a range of tools, including practical tips and innovative ideas on how to take full advantage of GNSS raw measurements.

Join us at ION GNSS+ 2017

Join the GSA and Frank van Diggelen (Google), Mark Dumville (NSL), Moises Navarro (Astrium) and Lukasz Bonenberg (University of Nottingham) for a preview of the White Paper and an interactive discussion on such topics as: 

  • Tips and innovative ideas on using GNSS raw measurements
  • Results from tests using raw measurements conducted by different experts
  • Advice on how to ensure the use of Galileo in smart¬phone applications
  • Expert insights on the challenges and opportunities of GNSS raw measurements

Moderated by Fiammetta Diani, GSA Deputy Head of Market Development, the session will take place on Thursday September 28 from 2:00 – 2:45pm in Room C120-122 during ION GNSS+ 2017, held in Portland, Oregon (USA). To learn more about the session, click here and to register for the event click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Join the GSA at ION GNSS+ 2017 for a special session on using GNSS raw measurements. The session will take place on Thursday September 28 from 2:00 – 2:45pm in Room C120-122.

GNSS Experts to talk about the value of raw measurements at ION GNSS+ 2017

22.9.2017 9:46  
Join the GSA at ION GNSS+ 2017 for a special session on using GNSS raw measurements. The session will take place on Thursday September 28 from 2:00 – 2:45pm in Room C120-122.
Published: 
22 September 2017

Are GNSS raw measurements in consumer devices just a playground for scientists, or do they represent a real market opportunity? To find out, join the European GNSS Agency (GSA) and a panel of industry experts as they discuss the topic on 28 September at ION GNSS+ 2017.

With a smartphone featuring Android 7.0 (i.e., Nougat), users now have access to raw GNSS measurements. This feature opens the door to higher-accuracy and the development of algorithms once restricted to more advanced GNSS receivers. This new capability also allows users to fully benefit from the special features offered by Galileo, and to combine it with other constellations in the most efficient way.

Although Nougat makes accessing raw data easier, using it remains a challenge. In fact, its use remains largely limited to research centres, universities and GNSS experts – which raises the question: is there real market opportunity in GNSS raw measurements or is it simply a playground for scientists and experts?

White Paper on using GNSS raw measurements

To answer this question, the GSA launched the Raw Measurements Task Force. Comprised of GNSS experts, scientists and market players, the Task Force aims to foster a wider use of these raw measurements. Their White Paper, set to be published soon, will provide applica¬tion developers with a range of tools, including practical tips and innovative ideas on how to take full advantage of GNSS raw measurements.

Join us at ION GNSS+ 2017

Join the GSA and Frank van Diggelen (Google), Mark Dumville (NSL), Moises Navarro (Astrium) and Lukasz Bonenberg (University of Nottingham) for a preview of the White Paper and an interactive discussion on such topics as: 

  • Tips and innovative ideas on using GNSS raw measurements
  • Results from tests using raw measurements conducted by different experts
  • Advice on how to ensure the use of Galileo in smart¬phone applications
  • Expert insights on the challenges and opportunities of GNSS raw measurements

Moderated by Fiammetta Diani, GSA Deputy Head of Market Development, the session will take place on Thursday September 28 from 2:00 – 2:45pm in Room C120-122 during ION GNSS+ 2017, held in Portland, Oregon (USA). To learn more about the session, click here and to register for the event click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Join the GSA at ION GNSS+ 2017 for a special session on using GNSS raw measurements. The session will take place on Thursday September 28 from 2:00 – 2:45pm in Room C120-122.

GNSS Experts to talk about the value of raw measurements at ION GNSS+ 2017

22.9.2017 9:46  
Join the GSA at ION GNSS+ 2017 for a special session on using GNSS raw measurements. The session will take place on Thursday September 28 from 2:00 – 2:45pm in Room C120-122.
Published: 
22 September 2017

Are GNSS raw measurements in consumer devices just a playground for scientists, or do they represent a real market opportunity? To find out, join the European GNSS Agency (GSA) and a panel of industry experts as they discuss the topic on 28 September at ION GNSS+ 2017.

With a smartphone featuring Android 7.0 (i.e., Nougat), users now have access to raw GNSS measurements. This feature opens the door to higher-accuracy and the development of algorithms once restricted to more advanced GNSS receivers. This new capability also allows users to fully benefit from the special features offered by Galileo, and to combine it with other constellations in the most efficient way.

Although Nougat makes accessing raw data easier, using it remains a challenge. In fact, its use remains largely limited to research centres, universities and GNSS experts – which raises the question: is there real market opportunity in GNSS raw measurements or is it simply a playground for scientists and experts?

White Paper on using GNSS raw measurements

To answer this question, the GSA launched the Raw Measurements Task Force. Comprised of GNSS experts, scientists and market players, the Task Force aims to foster a wider use of these raw measurements. Their White Paper, set to be published soon, will provide application developers with a range of tools, including practical tips and innovative ideas on how to take full advantage of GNSS raw measurements.

Join us at ION GNSS+ 2017

Join the GSA and Frank van Diggelen (Google), Mark Dumville (NSL), Moises Navarro (Astrium) and Lukasz Bonenberg (University of Nottingham) for a preview of the White Paper and an interactive discussion on such topics as: 

  • Tips and innovative ideas on using GNSS raw measurements
  • Results from tests using raw measurements conducted by different experts
  • Advice on how to ensure the use of Galileo in smart¬phone applications
  • Expert insights on the challenges and opportunities of GNSS raw measurements

Moderated by Fiammetta Diani, GSA Deputy Head of Market Development, the session will take place on Thursday September 28 from 2:00 – 2:45pm in Room C120-122 during ION GNSS+ 2017, held in Portland, Oregon (USA). To learn more about the session, click here and to register for the event click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Join the GSA at ION GNSS+ 2017 for a special session on using GNSS raw measurements. The session will take place on Thursday September 28 from 2:00 – 2:45pm in Room C120-122.

GNSS Experts to talk about the value of raw measurements at ION GNSS+ 2017

22.9.2017 9:46  
Join the GSA at ION GNSS+ 2017 for a special session on using GNSS raw measurements. The session will take place on Thursday September 28 from 2:00 – 2:45pm in Room C120-122.
Published: 
22 September 2017

Are GNSS raw measurements in consumer devices just a playground for scientists, or do they represent a real market opportunity? To find out, join the European GNSS Agency (GSA) and a panel of industry experts as they discuss the topic on 28 September at ION GNSS+ 2017.

With a smartphone featuring Android 7.0 (i.e., Nougat), users now have access to raw GNSS measurements. This feature opens the door to higher-accuracy and the development of algorithms once restricted to more advanced GNSS receivers. This new capability also allows users to fully benefit from the special features offered by Galileo, and to combine it with other constellations in the most efficient way.

Although Nougat makes accessing raw data easier, using it remains a challenge. In fact, its use remains largely limited to research centres, universities and GNSS experts – which raises the question: is there real market opportunity in GNSS raw measurements or is it simply a playground for scientists and experts?

White Paper on using GNSS raw measurements

To answer this question, the GSA launched the Raw Measurements Task Force. Comprised of GNSS experts, scientists and market players, the Task Force aims to foster a wider use of these raw measurements. Their White Paper, set to be published soon, will provide application developers with a range of tools, including practical tips and innovative ideas on how to take full advantage of GNSS raw measurements.

Join us at ION GNSS+ 2017

Join the GSA and Frank van Diggelen (Google), Mark Dumville (NSL), Moises Navarro (Astrium) and Lukasz Bonenberg (University of Nottingham) for a preview of the White Paper and an interactive discussion on such topics as: 

  • Tips and innovative ideas on using GNSS raw measurements
  • Results from tests using raw measurements conducted by different experts
  • Advice on how to ensure the use of Galileo in smart¬phone applications
  • Expert insights on the challenges and opportunities of GNSS raw measurements

Moderated by Fiammetta Diani, GSA Deputy Head of Market Development, the session will take place on Thursday September 28 from 2:00 – 2:45pm in Room C120-122 during ION GNSS+ 2017, held in Portland, Oregon (USA). To learn more about the session, click here and to register for the event click here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Join the GSA at ION GNSS+ 2017 for a special session on using GNSS raw measurements. The session will take place on Thursday September 28 from 2:00 – 2:45pm in Room C120-122.

Broadcom announces world’s first dual frequency GNSS receiver for smartphones

21.9.2017 16:23  
Published: 
21 September 2017

Broadcom Limited, a leading developer of digital and analogue semiconductor connectivity solutions, recently announced the launch of the world’s first mass-market, dual frequency GNSS receiver device for smartphones, the BCM47755.

Equipped with the latest GNSS innovations, the new Broadcom BCM47755 receiver provides centimetre accuracy with minimal power consumption and footprint. As a result, it is set to enable an entirely new suite of high-precision LBS applications, including lane-level vehicle navigation and mobile augmented reality (AR).

Until now, mobile location based applications have been powered by single frequency GNSS receivers operating under stringent battery power and footprint constraints. The expanded availability of L1/E1 and L5/E5 frequencies in satellite constellations, in particular thanks to Europe’s Galileo constellation, makes it possible to use both frequencies to compute position much more accurately in both urban and open area environments.

Galileo stands ready

Galileo, which offers both the E1 and E5 frequency as a standard feature, is well positioned to be a major differentiator in this potentially huge market. With E5/L5 capability added to the E1/L1, chipsets and receivers benefit from better accuracy, ionosphere error cancellation, improved code tracking pseudorange estimates, and faster transition from code tracking to phase tracking, among other benefits.

“We are glad to see the industry recognising the advantages of dual frequency GNSS receivers, including Galileo E1 and E5,” says GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. “We believe Galileo’s contribution is instrumental to reaching mass market GNSS centimetre level accuracy.”

The strength of the Galileo signal, together with advanced code modulations, makes Galileo better at mitigating multipath effects – especially in E5. The Broadcom receiver’s combination of the E1/L1 and E5/L5 frequencies significantly contributes to reducing errors in urban environments, thus allowing location-based applications to offer a better consumer experience. 

“With the launch of the dual-frequency GNSS sensor hub, Broadcom continues the tradition of raising the bar for mobile GNSS,” said Vijay Nagarajan, senior director of product marketing at the Broadcom Mobile Connectivity Products Division. “Location-based consumer applications can be disruptively enhanced with centimetre-level accuracy. On the other hand, lower power consumption and smaller footprint continue to be defining requirements for any mobile phone chip. The BCM47755 achieves these twin objectives for a richer consumer experience.”

For example, turn-by-turn navigation performance will improve thanks to the provision of lane-level knowledge of a vehicle's location, and ride hailing applications can be enhanced to more precisely pinpoint driver and client location. What’s more, even while enjoying this improved navigation experience, consumers will also benefit from the fact that batteries on mobile devices using the BCM47755 receiver will last longer as, according to the manufacturer, it consumes less than half the power of previous generation GNSS chips.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Using the Galileo dual frequency, the new Broadcom chipset will be able to compute position more accurately in both urban and open area environments.

Broadcom announces world’s first dual frequency GNSS receiver for smartphones

21.9.2017 16:23  
Published: 
21 September 2017

Broadcom Limited, a leading developer of digital and analogue semiconductor connectivity solutions, recently announced the launch of the world’s first mass-market, dual frequency GNSS receiver device for smartphones, the BCM47755.

Equipped with the latest GNSS innovations, the new Broadcom BCM47755 receiver provides lane-level accuracy with minimal power consumption and footprint. As a result, it is set to enable an entirely new suite of high-precision LBS applications, including lane-level vehicle navigation and mobile augmented reality (AR).

Until now, mobile location based applications have been powered by single frequency GNSS receivers operating under stringent battery power and footprint constraints. The expanded availability of L1/E1 and L5/E5 frequencies in satellite constellations, in particular thanks to Europe’s Galileo constellation, makes it possible to use both frequencies to compute position much more accurately in both urban and open area environments.

Galileo stands ready

Galileo, which offers both the E1 and E5 frequency as a standard feature, is well positioned to be a major differentiator in this potentially huge market. With E5/L5 capability added to the E1/L1, chipsets and receivers benefit from better accuracy, ionosphere error cancellation, improved code tracking pseudorange estimates, and faster transition from code tracking to phase tracking, among other benefits.

“We are glad to see the industry recognising the advantages of dual frequency GNSS receivers, including Galileo E1 and E5,” says GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. “We believe Galileo’s contribution is instrumental to reaching mass market GNSS centimetre-level accuracy.”

The strength of the Galileo signal, together with advanced code modulations, makes Galileo better at mitigating multipath effects – especially in E5. The Broadcom receiver’s combination of the E1/L1 and E5/L5 frequencies significantly contributes to reducing errors in urban environments, thus allowing location-based applications to offer a better consumer experience. 

“With the launch of the dual-frequency GNSS sensor hub, Broadcom continues the tradition of raising the bar for mobile GNSS,” said Vijay Nagarajan, senior director of product marketing at the Broadcom Mobile Connectivity Products Division. “Location-based consumer applications can be disruptively enhanced with centimetre-level accuracy. On the other hand, lower power consumption and smaller footprint continue to be defining requirements for any mobile phone chip. The BCM47755 achieves these twin objectives for a richer consumer experience.”

For example, turn-by-turn navigation performance will improve thanks to the provision of lane-level knowledge of a vehicle's location, and ride hailing applications can be enhanced to more precisely pinpoint driver and client location. What’s more, even while enjoying this improved navigation experience, consumers will also benefit from the fact that batteries on mobile devices using the BCM47755 receiver will last longer as, according to the manufacturer, it consumes less than half the power of previous generation GNSS chips.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Using the Galileo dual frequency, the new Broadcom chipset will be able to compute position more accurately in both urban and open area environments.

Broadcom announces world’s first dual frequency GNSS receiver for smartphones

21.9.2017 16:23  
Published: 
21 September 2017

Broadcom Limited, a leading developer of digital and analogue semiconductor connectivity solutions, recently announced the launch of the world’s first mass-market, dual frequency GNSS receiver device for smartphones, the BCM47755.

Equipped with the latest GNSS innovations, the new Broadcom BCM47755 receiver provides lane-level accuracy with minimal power consumption and footprint. As a result, it is set to enable an entirely new suite of high-precision LBS applications, including lane-level vehicle navigation and mobile augmented reality (AR).

Until now, mobile location based applications have been powered by single frequency GNSS receivers operating under stringent battery power and footprint constraints. The expanded availability of L1/E1 and L5/E5 frequencies in satellite constellations, in particular thanks to Europe’s Galileo constellation, makes it possible to use both frequencies to compute position much more accurately in both urban and open area environments.

Galileo stands ready

Galileo, which offers both the E1 and E5 frequency as a standard feature, is well positioned to be a major differentiator in this potentially huge market. With E5/L5 capability added to the E1/L1, chipsets and receivers benefit from better accuracy, ionosphere error cancellation, improved code tracking pseudorange estimates, and faster transition from code tracking to phase tracking, among other benefits.

“We are glad to see the industry recognising the advantages of dual frequency GNSS receivers, including Galileo E1 and E5,” says GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. “We believe Galileo’s contribution is instrumental to reaching mass market GNSS centimetre-level accuracy.”

The strength of the Galileo signal, together with advanced code modulations, makes Galileo better at mitigating multipath effects – especially in E5. The Broadcom receiver’s combination of the E1/L1 and E5/L5 frequencies significantly contributes to reducing errors in urban environments, thus allowing location-based applications to offer a better consumer experience. 

“With the launch of the dual-frequency GNSS sensor hub, Broadcom continues the tradition of raising the bar for mobile GNSS,” said Vijay Nagarajan, senior director of product marketing at the Broadcom Mobile Connectivity Products Division. “Location-based consumer applications can be disruptively enhanced with centimetre-level accuracy. On the other hand, lower power consumption and smaller footprint continue to be defining requirements for any mobile phone chip. The BCM47755 achieves these twin objectives for a richer consumer experience.”

For example, turn-by-turn navigation performance will improve thanks to the provision of lane-level knowledge of a vehicle's location, and ride hailing applications can be enhanced to more precisely pinpoint driver and client location. What’s more, even while enjoying this improved navigation experience, consumers will also benefit from the fact that batteries on mobile devices using the BCM47755 receiver will last longer as, according to the manufacturer, it consumes less than half the power of previous generation GNSS chips.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Using the Galileo dual frequency, the new Broadcom chipset will be able to compute position more accurately in both urban and open area environments.

Broadcom announces world’s first dual frequency GNSS receiver for smartphones

21.9.2017 16:23  
Published: 
21 September 2017

Broadcom Limited, a leading developer of digital and analogue semiconductor connectivity solutions, recently announced the launch of the world’s first mass-market, dual frequency GNSS receiver device for smartphones, the BCM47755.

Equipped with the latest GNSS innovations, the new Broadcom BCM47755 receiver provides lane-level accuracy with minimal power consumption and footprint. As a result, it is set to enable an entirely new suite of high-precision LBS applications, including lane-level vehicle navigation and mobile augmented reality (AR).

Until now, mobile location based applications have been powered by single frequency GNSS receivers operating under stringent battery power and footprint constraints. The expanded availability of L1/E1 and L5/E5 frequencies in satellite constellations, in particular thanks to Europe’s Galileo constellation, makes it possible to use both frequencies to compute position much more accurately in both urban and open area environments.

Galileo stands ready

Galileo, which offers both the E1 and E5 frequency as a standard feature, is well positioned to be a major differentiator in this potentially huge market. With E5/L5 capability added to the E1/L1, chipsets and receivers benefit from better accuracy, ionosphere error cancellation, improved code tracking pseudorange estimates, and faster transition from code tracking to phase tracking, among other benefits.

“We are glad to see the industry recognising the advantages of dual frequency GNSS receivers, including Galileo E1 and E5,” says GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. “We believe Galileo’s contribution is instrumental to reaching mass market GNSS centimetre-level accuracy.”

The strength of the Galileo signal, together with advanced code modulations, makes Galileo better at mitigating multipath effects – especially in E5. The Broadcom receiver’s combination of the E1/L1 and E5/L5 frequencies significantly contributes to reducing errors in urban environments, thus allowing location-based applications to offer a better consumer experience. 

“With the launch of the dual-frequency GNSS sensor hub, Broadcom continues the tradition of raising the bar for mobile GNSS,” said Vijay Nagarajan, senior director of product marketing at the Broadcom Mobile Connectivity Products Division. “Location-based consumer applications can be disruptively enhanced with centimetre-level accuracy. On the other hand, lower power consumption and smaller footprint continue to be defining requirements for any mobile phone chip. The BCM47755 achieves these twin objectives for a richer consumer experience.”

For example, turn-by-turn navigation performance will improve thanks to the provision of lane-level knowledge of a vehicle's location, and ride hailing applications can be enhanced to more precisely pinpoint driver and client location. What’s more, even while enjoying this improved navigation experience, consumers will also benefit from the fact that batteries on mobile devices using the BCM47755 receiver will last longer as, according to the manufacturer, it consumes less than half the power of previous generation GNSS chips.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Using the Galileo dual frequency, the new Broadcom chipset will be able to compute position more accurately in both urban and open area environments.

Broadcom announces world’s first dual frequency GNSS receiver for smartphones

21.9.2017 16:23  
Published: 
21 September 2017

Broadcom Limited, a leading developer of digital and analogue semiconductor connectivity solutions, recently announced the launch of the world’s first mass-market, dual frequency GNSS receiver device for smartphones, the BCM47755.

Equipped with the latest GNSS innovations, the new Broadcom BCM47755 receiver provides centimetre accuracy with minimal power consumption and footprint. As a result, it is set to enable an entirely new suite of high-precision LBS applications, including lane-level vehicle navigation and mobile augmented reality (AR).

Until now, mobile location based applications have been powered by single frequency GNSS receivers operating under stringent battery power and footprint constraints. The expanded availability of L1/E1 and L5/E5 frequencies in satellite constellations, in particular thanks to Europe’s Galileo constellation, makes it possible to use both frequencies to compute position much more accurately in both urban and open area environments.

Galileo stands ready

Galileo, which offers both the E1 and E5 frequency as a standard feature, is well positioned to be a major differentiator in this potentially huge market. With E5/L5 capability added to the E1/L1, chipsets and receivers benefit from better accuracy, ionosphere error cancellation, improved code tracking pseudorange estimates, and faster transition from code tracking to phase tracking, among other benefits.

“We are glad to see the industry recognising the advantages of dual frequency GNSS receivers, including Galileo E1 and E5,” says GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. “We believe Galileo’s contribution is instrumental to reaching mass market GNSS centimetre level accuracy.”

The strength of the Galileo signal, together with advanced code modulations, makes Galileo better at mitigating multipath effects – especially in E5. The Broadcom receiver’s combination of the E1/L1 and E5/L5 frequencies significantly contributes to reducing errors in urban environments, thus allowing location-based applications to offer a better consumer experience. 

“With the launch of the dual-frequency GNSS sensor hub, Broadcom continues the tradition of raising the bar for mobile GNSS,” said Vijay Nagarajan, senior director of product marketing at the Broadcom Mobile Connectivity Products Division. “Location-based consumer applications can be disruptively enhanced with centimetre-level accuracy. On the other hand, lower power consumption and smaller footprint continue to be defining requirements for any mobile phone chip. The BCM47755 achieves these twin objectives for a richer consumer experience.”

For example, turn-by-turn navigation performance will improve thanks to the provision of lane-level knowledge of a vehicle's location, and ride hailing applications can be enhanced to more precisely pinpoint driver and client location. What’s more, even while enjoying this improved navigation experience, consumers will also benefit from the fact that batteries on mobile devices using the BCM47755 receiver will last longer as, according to the manufacturer, it consumes less than half the power of previous generation GNSS chips.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Using the Galileo dual frequency, the new Broadcom chipset will be able to compute position more accurately in both urban and open area environments.

Tartu to host SpaceTech Integrated Applications hackathon in November

19.9.2017 13:55  
Published: 
19 September 2017

Engineers, developers, designers, scientists, and other experts will come together at the SpaceTech Integrated Applications hackathon in Tartu, Estonia, on 3-5 November to brainstorm on possibilities for new applications that combine satellite navigation positioning systems, Earth observation data, hardware and social media.

The SpaceTech Integrated Applications hackathon is to take place as part of European Space Week in Tartu, Estonia. Organised by Garage48 together with the European GNSS Agency (GSA), the European Space Agency (ESA) and ESTCube, this year the hackathon will have four main streams:

The goal of the hackathon is to give participants the opportunity of meeting with like-minded people and exploring the possibilities of space technology, to come up with exciting ideas on how to use different elements from the four streams to create integrated solutions that allow people to reap the greatest possible benefit from space.

GSA Market Development Officer Justyna Redelkiewicz noted that the GSA was extremely excited to join SpaceTech this year. “This is the third hackathon for Galileo, yet this opportunity is unique - participants will be able to integrate different space technologies and data to come up with some disruptive solutions that can improve our life on Earth. We are looking forward to empowering participants with the knowledge and support to take their app to the next level with GNSS positioning,” she said.

Paul Liias, a space expert at the Estonian Ministry of Economic Affairs and Communication, noted that the international hackathon aims to create the best possible conditions for new businesses in space technology to come into being. “We have organized free access to Copernicus data and a Galileo signal for all the participants - all to ensure the optimal outcome,” he said.

The hackathon will be held in the Physicum gallery at the University of Tartu. It starts at 17:30 on Friday 3 November with a pitching session and ends on the evening of Sunday 5 November with the announcement of the winners and a networking session. We will announce details about the prizes and the tech partners at a later date, so stay tuned!

If you are interested in attending the event, you can register here until 23 October. A pre-event webinar on 18 October will provide you with inspiration and help you prepare. If you are unable to attend the hackathon in person don’t worry – the event will be livestreamed. Details on the webinar and livestreaming will follow later.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Engineers, developers, designers, scientists, and other experts to brainstorm at SpaceTech Integrated Applications on 3-5 November

Tartu to host SpaceTech Integrated Applications hackathon in November

19.9.2017 13:55  
Published: 
19 September 2017

Engineers, developers, designers, scientists, and other experts will come together at the SpaceTech Integrated Applications hackathon in Tartu, Estonia, on 3-5 November to brainstorm on possibilities for new applications that combine satellite navigation positioning systems, Earth observation data, hardware and social media.

The SpaceTech Integrated Applications hackathon is to take place as part of European Space Week in Tartu, Estonia. Organised by Garage48 together with the European GNSS Agency (GSA), the European Space Agency (ESA) and ESTCube, this year the hackathon will have four main streams:

  • Satellite Positioning stream, powered by GSA;
  • Earth Observation stream, powered by ESA;
  • Hardware stream powered by ESTCube; and a
  • Social Media stream / Open Data stream.

The goal of the hackathon is to give participants the opportunity of meeting with like-minded people and exploring the possibilities of space technology, to come up with exciting ideas on how to use different elements from the four streams to create integrated solutions that allow people to reap the greatest possible benefit from space.

GSA Market Development Officer Justyna Redelkiewicz noted that the GSA was extremely excited to join SpaceTech this year. “This is the third hackathon for Galileo, yet this opportunity is unique - participants will be able to integrate different space technologies and data to come up with some disruptive solutions that can improve our life on Earth. We are looking forward to empowering participants with the knowledge and support to take their app to the next level with GNSS positioning,” she said.

Paul Liias, a space expert at the Estonian Ministry of Economic Affairs and Communication, noted that the international hackathon aims to create the best possible conditions for new businesses in space technology to come into being. “We have organized free access to Copernicus data and a Galileo signal for all the participants - all to ensure the optimal outcome,” he said.

The hackathon will be held in the Physicum gallery at the University of Tartu. It starts at 17:30 on Friday 3 November with a pitching session and ends on the evening of Sunday 5 November with the announcement of the winners and a networking session. We will announce details about the prizes and the tech partners at a later date, so stay tuned!

If you are interested in attending the event, you can register here until 23 October. A pre-event webinar on 18 October will provide you with inspiration and help you prepare. If you are unable to attend the hackathon in person don’t worry – the event will be livestreamed. Details on the webinar and livestreaming will follow later.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Engineers, developers, designers, scientists, and other experts to brainstorm at SpaceTech Integrated Applications on 3-5 November

Tartu to host SpaceTech Integrated Applications hackathon in November

19.9.2017 13:55  
Published: 
19 September 2017

Engineers, developers, designers, scientists, and other experts will come together at the SpaceTech Integrated Applications hackathon in Tartu, Estonia, on 3-5 November to brainstorm on possibilities for new applications that combine satellite navigation positioning systems, Earth observation data, hardware and social media.

The SpaceTech Integrated Applications hackathon is to take place as part of European Space Week in Tartu, Estonia. Organised by Garage48 together with the European GNSS Agency (GSA), the European Space Agency (ESA) and ESTCube, this year the hackathon will have four main streams:

The goal of the hackathon is to give participants the opportunity of meeting with like-minded people and exploring the possibilities of space technology, to come up with exciting ideas on how to use different elements from the four streams to create integrated solutions that allow people to reap the greatest possible benefit from space.

GSA Market Development Officer Justyna Redelkiewicz noted that the GSA was extremely excited to join SpaceTech this year. “This is the third hackathon for Galileo, yet this opportunity is unique - participants will be able to integrate different space technologies and data to come up with some disruptive solutions that can improve our life on Earth. We are looking forward to empowering participants with the knowledge and support to take their app to the next level with GNSS positioning,” she said.

Paul Liias, a space expert at the Estonian Ministry of Economic Affairs and Communication, noted that the international hackathon aims to create the best possible conditions for new businesses in space technology to come into being. “We have organized free access to Copernicus data and a Galileo signal for all the participants - all to ensure the optimal outcome,” he said.

The hackathon will be held in the Physicum gallery at the University of Tartu. It starts at 17:30 on Friday 3 November with a pitching session and ends on the evening of Sunday 5 November with the announcement of the winners and a networking session. We will announce details about the prizes and the tech partners at a later date, so stay tuned!

If you are interested in attending the event, you can register here until 23 October. A pre-event webinar on 18 October will provide you with inspiration and help you prepare. If you are unable to attend the hackathon in person don’t worry – the event will be livestreamed. Details on the webinar and livestreaming will follow later.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Engineers, developers, designers, scientists, and other experts to brainstorm at SpaceTech Integrated Applications on 3-5 November

The latest iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, and iPhone X are Galileo-enabled

18.9.2017 12:03  
Latest Apple iPhone 8 uses Galileo.
Published: 
18 September 2017

The new features of the latest iPhone, launched on September 13, include built-in support for the European Galileo satellite system, among other GNSS. This multi-constellation support means that the new phones will offer more accurate positioning, making it harder for iPhone users to get lost, wherever they are.

Apple unveiled its iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus, in addition to the iPhone X, at a much-anticipated event held at the Apple campus in Cupertino, California on September 13.

Among the new features of the latest Apple offerings is the fact that the newest versions of the iPhone are Galileo-enabled. The resulting ‘multi-constellation’ capability means that users of the new iPhones will be able to benefit from more precise positioning that combines GPS, Glonass and Galileo signals. The use of multi-constellation increases signal availability, especially in urban environments, where buildings obstruct the sky and limit the number of satellites visible. In terms of accuracy, Galileo’s modern signal structure has better resistance to multipath, which helps users maintain their position fix when navigating in cities.

European Commissioner Elżbieta Bieńkowska, responsible for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs, noted that the launch of Galileo Initial Services had provided an impetus to industry to adopt the technology. “Since we launched Galileo last year, more and more device manufacturers are starting to incorporate its signals, which is a demonstration of the excellence and added-value of European technology" she said, adding that “the success of Galileo lies in its use in everyday devices such as mobile phones and car navigation.”

Timely Galileo support

The iPhone has had built-in support for GPS for some time, and added support for the Russian GNSS system Glonass to the iPhone 4S model, which was launched in 2011. The iPhone X and the iPhone 8 and 8 Plus are the first Apple phones to support Galileo. This new feature is well-timed, as Galileo Initial Services have been available since December 2016. 

“This latest development is proof of the value that Galileo brings to the market,” said GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. “The work started by the GSA years ago to engage with industry has started to deliver following the declaration of Galileo Initial Services. Now, companies accounting for around 50%1 of the smartphone market offer Galileo-enabled navigation.”

By supporting Galileo, the new iPhones join the growing list of smartphones that support the European satellite system, including a range of phones from BQ, Huawei and Samsung, in addition to models from Meizu and Sony.

For up-to-date information on all Galileo-enabled products, check out: www.useGalileo.eu

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

With its new iPhone models, Apple joins the growing list of smartphones that support Galileo.

The latest iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, and iPhone X are Galileo-enabled

18.9.2017 12:03  
Latest Apple iPhone 8 uses Galileo.
Published: 
18 September 2017

The new features of the latest iPhone, launched on September 13, include built-in support for the European Galileo satellite system, among other GNSS. This multi-constellation support means that the new phones will offer more accurate positioning, making it harder for iPhone users to get lost, wherever they are.

Apple unveiled its iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus, in addition to the iPhone X, at a much-anticipated event held at the Apple campus in Cupertino, California on September 13.

Among the new features of the latest Apple offerings is the fact that the newest versions of the iPhone are Galileo-enabled. The resulting ‘multi-constellation’ capability means that users of the new iPhones will be able to benefit from more precise positioning that combines GPS, Glonass and Galileo signals. The use of multi-constellation increases signal availability, especially in urban environments, where buildings obstruct the sky and limit the number of satellites visible. In terms of accuracy, Galileo’s modern signal structure has better resistance to multipath, which helps users maintain their position fix when navigating in cities.

European Commissioner Elżbieta Bieńkowska, responsible for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs, noted that the launch of Galileo Initial Services had provided an impetus to industry to adopt the technology. “Since we launched Galileo last year, more and more device manufacturers are starting to incorporate its signals, which is a demonstration of the excellence and added-value of European technology" she said, adding that “the success of Galileo lies in its use in everyday devices such as mobile phones and car navigation.”

Timely Galileo support

The iPhone has had built-in support for GPS for some time, and added support for the Russian GNSS system Glonass to the iPhone 4S model, which was launched in 2011. The iPhone X and the iPhone 8 and 8 Plus are the first Apple phones to support Galileo. This new feature is well-timed, as Galileo Initial Services have been available since December 2016. 

“This latest development is proof of the value that Galileo brings to the market,” said GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. “The work started by the GSA years ago to engage with industry has started to deliver following the declaration of Galileo Initial Services. Now, companies accounting for around 50%1 of the smartphone market offer Galileo-enabled navigation.”

By supporting Galileo, the new iPhones join the growing list of smartphones that support the European satellite system, including a range of phones from BQ, Huawei and Samsung, in addition to models from Meizu and Sony.

For up-to-date information on all Galileo-enabled products, check out: www.useGalileo.eu

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

With its new iPhone models, Apple joins the growing list of smartphones that support Galileo.

The latest iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, and iPhone X are Galileo-enabled

18.9.2017 12:03  
Latest Apple iPhone 8 uses Galileo.
Published: 
18 September 2017

The new features of the latest iPhone, launched on September 13, include built-in support for the European Galileo satellite system, among other GNSS. This multi-constellation support means that the new phones will offer more accurate positioning, making it harder for iPhone users to get lost, wherever they are.

Apple unveiled its iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus, in addition to the iPhone X, at a much-anticipated event held at the Apple campus in Cupertino, California on September 13.

Among the new features of the latest Apple offerings is the fact that the newest versions of the iPhone are Galileo-enabled. The resulting ‘multi-constellation’ capability means that users of the new iPhones will be able to benefit from more precise positioning that combines GPS, Glonass and Galileo signals. The use of multi-constellation increases signal availability, especially in urban environments, where buildings obstruct the sky and limit the number of satellites visible. In terms of accuracy, Galileo’s modern signal structure has better resistance to multipath, which helps users maintain their position fix when navigating in cities.

European Commissioner Elżbieta Bieńkowska, responsible for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs, noted that the launch of Galileo Initial Services had provided an impetus to industry to adopt the technology. “Since we launched Galileo last year, more and more device manufacturers are starting to incorporate its signals, which is a demonstration of the excellence and added-value of European technology" she said, adding that “the success of Galileo lies in its use in everyday devices such as mobile phones and car navigation.”

Timely Galileo support

The iPhone has had built-in support for GPS for some time, and added support for the Russian GNSS system Glonass to the iPhone 4S model, which was launched in 2011. The iPhone X and the iPhone 8 and 8 Plus are the first Apple phones to support Galileo. This new feature is well-timed, as Galileo Initial Services have been available since December 2016. 

“This latest development is proof of the value that Galileo brings to the market,” said GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. “The work started by the GSA years ago to engage with industry has started to deliver following the declaration of Galileo Initial Services. Now, companies accounting for around 50%1 of the smartphone market offer Galileo-enabled navigation.”

By supporting Galileo, the new iPhones join the growing list of smartphones that support the European satellite system, including a range of phones from BQ, Huawei and Samsung, in addition to models from Meizu and Sony.

For up-to-date information on all Galileo-enabled products, check out: www.useGalileo.eu

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

With its new iPhone models, Apple joins the growing list of smartphones that support Galileo.

The latest iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, and iPhone X are Galileo-enabled

18.9.2017 12:03  
Latest Apple iPhone 8 uses Galileo.
Published: 
18 September 2017

The new features of the latest iPhone, launched on September 13, include built-in support for the European Galileo satellite system, among other GNSS. This multi-constellation support means that the new phones will offer more accurate positioning, making it harder for iPhone users to get lost, wherever they are.

Apple unveiled its iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus, in addition to the iPhone X, at a much-anticipated event held at the Apple campus in Cupertino, California on September 13.

Among the new features of the latest Apple offerings is the fact that the newest versions of the iPhone are Galileo-enabled. The resulting ‘multi-constellation’ capability means that users of the new iPhones will be able to benefit from more precise positioning that combines GPS, Glonass and Galileo signals. The use of multi-constellation increases signal availability, especially in urban environments, where buildings obstruct the sky and limit the number of satellites visible. In terms of accuracy, Galileo’s modern signal structure has better resistance to multipath, which helps users maintain their position fix when navigating in cities.

European Commissioner Elżbieta Bieńkowska, responsible for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs, noted that the launch of Galileo Initial Services had provided an impetus to industry to adopt the technology. “Since we launched Galileo last year, more and more device manufacturers are starting to incorporate its signals, which is a demonstration of the excellence and added-value of European technology" she said, adding that “the success of Galileo lies in its use in everyday devices such as mobile phones and car navigation.”

Timely Galileo support

The iPhone has had built-in support for GPS for some time, and added support for the Russian GNSS system Glonass to the iPhone 4S model, which was launched in 2011. The iPhone X and the iPhone 8 and 8 Plus are the first Apple phones to support Galileo. This new feature is well-timed, as Galileo Initial Services have been available since December 2016. 

“This latest development is proof of the value that Galileo brings to the market,” said GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. “The work started by the GSA years ago to engage with industry has started to deliver following the declaration of Galileo Initial Services. Now, companies accounting for around 50%1 of the smartphone market offer Galileo-enabled navigation.”

By supporting Galileo, the new iPhones join the growing list of smartphones that support the European satellite system, including a range of phones from BQ, Huawei and Samsung, in addition to models from Meizu and Sony.

For up-to-date information on all Galileo-enabled products, check out: www.useGalileo.eu

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

With its new iPhone models, Apple joins the growing list of smartphones that support Galileo.

The latest iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, and iPhone X are Galileo-enabled

18.9.2017 12:03  
Latest Apple iPhone 8 uses Galileo.
Published: 
18 September 2017

The new features of the latest iPhone, launched on September 13, include built-in support for the European Galileo satellite system, among other GNSS. This multi-constellation support means that the new phones will offer more accurate positioning, making it harder for iPhone users to get lost, wherever they are.

Apple unveiled its iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus, in addition to the iPhone X, at a much-anticipated event held at the Apple campus in Cupertino, California on September 13.

Among the new features of the latest Apple offerings is the fact that the newest versions of the iPhone are Galileo-enabled. The resulting ‘multi-constellation’ capability means that users of the new iPhones will be able to benefit from more precise positioning that combines GPS, Glonass and Galileo signals. The use of multi-constellation increases signal availability, especially in urban environments, where buildings obstruct the sky and limit the number of satellites visible. In terms of accuracy, Galileo’s modern signal structure has better resistance to multipath, which helps users maintain their position fix when navigating in cities.

European Commissioner Elżbieta Bieńkowska, responsible for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs, noted that the launch of Galileo Initial Services had provided an impetus to industry to adopt the technology. “Since we launched Galileo last year, more and more device manufacturers are starting to incorporate its signals, which is a demonstration of the excellence and added-value of European technology" she said, adding that “the success of Galileo lies in its use in everyday devices such as mobile phones and car navigation.”

Timely Galileo support

The iPhone has had built-in support for GPS for some time, and added support for the Russian GNSS system Glonass to the iPhone 4S model, which was launched in 2011. The iPhone X and the iPhone 8 and 8 Plus are the first Apple phones to support Galileo. This new feature is well-timed, as Galileo Initial Services have been available since December 2016. 

“This latest development is proof of the value that Galileo brings to the market,” said GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. “The work started by the GSA years ago to engage with industry has started to deliver following the declaration of Galileo Initial Services. Now, companies accounting for around 50% (According to IBC: www.idc.com/promo/smartphone-market-share/vendor.) of the smartphone market offer Galileo-enabled navigation.”

By supporting Galileo, the new iPhones join the growing list of smartphones that support the European satellite system, including a range of phones from BQ, Huawei and Samsung, in addition to models from Meizu and Sony.

For up-to-date information on all Galileo-enabled products, check out: www.useGalileo.eu

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

With its new iPhone models, Apple joins the growing list of smartphones that support Galileo.

The latest iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, and iPhone X are Galileo-enabled

18.9.2017 12:03  
Latest Apple iPhone 8 uses Galileo.
Published: 
18 September 2017

The new features of the latest iPhone, launched on September 13, include built-in support for the European Galileo satellite system, among other GNSS. This multi-constellation support means that the new phones will offer more accurate positioning, making it harder for iPhone users to get lost, wherever they are.

Apple unveiled its iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus, in addition to the iPhone X, at a much-anticipated event held at the Apple campus in Cupertino, California on September 13.

Among the new features of the latest Apple offerings is the fact that the newest versions of the iPhone are Galileo-enabled. The resulting ‘multi-constellation’ capability means that users of the new iPhones will be able to benefit from more precise positioning that combines GPS, Glonass and Galileo signals. The use of multi-constellation increases signal availability, especially in urban environments, where buildings obstruct the sky and limit the number of satellites visible. In terms of accuracy, Galileo’s modern signal structure has better resistance to multipath, which helps users maintain their position fix when navigating in cities.

European Commissioner Elżbieta Bieńkowska, responsible for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs, noted that the launch of Galileo Initial Services had provided an impetus to industry to adopt the technology. “Since we launched Galileo last year, more and more device manufacturers are starting to incorporate its signals, which is a demonstration of the excellence and added-value of European technology" she said, adding that “the success of Galileo lies in its use in everyday devices such as mobile phones and car navigation.”

Timely Galileo support

The iPhone has had built-in support for GPS for some time, and added support for the Russian GNSS system Glonass to the iPhone 4S model, which was launched in 2011. The iPhone X and the iPhone 8 and 8 Plus are the first Apple phones to support Galileo. This new feature is well-timed, as Galileo Initial Services have been available since December 2016. 

“This latest development is proof of the value that Galileo brings to the market,” said GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. “The work started by the GSA years ago to engage with industry has started to deliver following the declaration of Galileo Initial Services. Now, companies accounting for around 50%1 of the smartphone market offer Galileo-enabled navigation.”

By supporting Galileo, the new iPhones join the growing list of smartphones that support the European satellite system, including a range of phones from BQ, Huawei and Samsung, in addition to models from Meizu and Sony.

For up-to-date information on all Galileo-enabled products, check out: www.useGalileo.eu

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

 

1 According to IBC: www.idc.com/promo/smartphone-market-share/vendor

With its new iPhone models, Apple joins the growing list of smartphones that support Galileo.

The latest iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, and iPhone X are Galileo-enabled

18.9.2017 12:03  
Latest Apple iPhone 8 uses Galileo.
Published: 
18 September 2017

The new features of the latest iPhone, launched on September 13, include built-in support for the European Galileo satellite system, among other GNSS. This multi-constellation support means that the new phones will offer more accurate positioning, making it harder for iPhone users to get lost, wherever they are.

Apple unveiled its iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus, in addition to the iPhone X, at a much-anticipated event held at the Apple campus in Cupertino, California on September 13.

Among the new features of the latest Apple offerings is the fact that the newest versions of the iPhone are Galileo-enabled. The resulting ‘multi-constellation’ capability means that users of the new iPhones will be able to benefit from more precise positioning that combines GPS, Glonass and Galileo signals. The use of multi-constellation increases signal availability, especially in urban environments, where buildings obstruct the sky and limit the number of satellites visible. In terms of accuracy, Galileo’s modern signal structure has better resistance to multipath, which helps users maintain their position fix when navigating in cities.

European Commissioner Elżbieta Bieńkowska, responsible for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs, noted that the launch of Galileo Initial Services had provided an impetus to industry to adopt the technology. “Since we launched Galileo last year, more and more device manufacturers are starting to incorporate its signals, which is a demonstration of the excellence and added-value of European technology" she said, adding that “the success of Galileo lies in its use in everyday devices such as mobile phones and car navigation.”

Timely Galileo support

The iPhone has had built-in support for GPS for some time, and added support for the Russian GNSS system Glonass to the iPhone 4S model, which was launched in 2011. The iPhone X and the iPhone 8 and 8 Plus are the first Apple phones to support Galileo. This new feature is well-timed, as Galileo Initial Services have been available since December 2016. 

“This latest development is proof of the value that Galileo brings to the market,” said GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. “The work started by the GSA years ago to engage with industry has started to deliver following the declaration of Galileo Initial Services. Now, companies accounting for around 50%1 of the smartphone market offer Galileo-enabled navigation.”

By supporting Galileo, the new iPhones join the growing list of smartphones that support the European satellite system, including a range of phones from BQ, Huawei and Samsung, in addition to models from Meizu and Sony.

For up-to-date information on all Galileo-enabled products, check out: www.useGalileo.eu

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

 

1 According to IBC: www.idc.com/promo/smartphone-market-share/vendor

With its new iPhone models, Apple joins the growing list of smartphones that support Galileo.

The latest iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, and iPhone X are Galileo-enabled

18.9.2017 12:03  
Latest Apple iPhone 8 uses Galileo.
Published: 
18 September 2017

Apple unveiled its iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus, in addition to the iPhone X, at a much-anticipated event held at the Apple campus in Cupertino, California on September 13.

Among the new features of the latest Apple offerings is the fact that the newest versions of the iPhone are Galileo-enabled. The resulting ‘multi-constellation’ capability means that users of the new iPhones will be able to benefit from more precise positioning that combines GPS, Glonass and Galileo signals. The use of multi-constellation increases signal availability, especially in urban environments, where buildings obstruct the sky and limit the number of satellites visible. In terms of accuracy, Galileo’s modern signal structure has better resistance to multipath, which helps users maintain their position fix when navigating in cities.

European Commissioner Elżbieta Bieńkowska, responsible for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs, noted that the launch of Galileo Initial Services had provided an impetus to industry to adopt the technology. “Since we launched Galileo last year, more and more device manufacturers are starting to incorporate its signals, which is a demonstration of the excellence and added-value of European technology" she said, adding that “the success of Galileo lies in its use in everyday devices such as mobile phones and car navigation.”

Timely Galileo support

The iPhone has had built-in support for GPS for some time, and added support for the Russian GNSS system Glonass to the iPhone 4S model, which was launched in 2011. The iPhone X and the iPhone 8 and 8 Plus are the first Apple phones to support Galileo. This new feature is well-timed, as Galileo Initial Services have been available since December 2016. 

“This latest development is proof of the value that Galileo brings to the market,” said GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. “The work started by the GSA years ago to engage with industry has started to deliver following the declaration of Galileo Initial Services. Now, companies accounting for around 50%  of the smartphone market offer Galileo-enabled navigation.” 

By supporting Galileo, the new iPhones join the growing list of smartphones that support the European satellite system, including a range of phones from BQ, Huawei and Samsung, in addition to models from Meizu and Sony.

For up-to-date information on all Galileo-enabled products, check out: www.useGalileo.eu

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

iPhone 8

The essential role of European GNSS in meteorology

13.9.2017 11:17  
As the effects of climate change continue to impact our day-to-day lives, European GNSS will play an increasing role in meteorology and weather forecasting.
Published: 
13 September 2017

With hurricanes battering the US, Europe just coming out of another hot summer, and all signs pointing to climate change – weather dominates both our headlines and our policy-making. But did you know that European GNSS plays an important and growing role in meteorology?

When it comes to meteorology, Galileo – and GNSS in general – can play both a direct and indirect role, especially as regards mitigating the effects of climate change. As the EU works to establish a resilient energy policy with a forward-looking climate change strategy, it is increasingly looking to space for answers. From providing the maps for finding the best locations for renewable energy infrastructure to outlining the most fuel-efficient flight paths, enabling precision farming, optimising road transportation routes and monitoring CO2 emissions, Galileo, EGNOS and Copernicus (Europe’s Earth observation system) provide innovative solutions to many of today’s weather-related challenges.

Whereas Galileo determines a precise position anytime, anywhere on the globe, Copernicus provides information on the Earth’s surface, its atmosphere and marine systems. By putting the two together, one can unleash synergies that results in multiple benefits for users.

“One area where we are already seeing the benefits of combining these programmes is with creating sustainable solutions to climate change,” says GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. “For example, both Galileo and Copernicus use satellite signals and data to help develop a better understanding of climate change and environmental issues via the accurate observation and measurement of, for instance, the state of the oceans or the chemical composition of the atmosphere.”

Also read: Galileo-Copernicus synergies explored at Prague Copernicus forum

In a more specific context, Galileo provides better weather forecasting by helping to estimate the water vapour in the atmosphere. Water vapour is routinely used for numerical weather prediction, along with very short weather prediction (i.e., now-casting). It is also helpful for monitoring the greenhouse effect and climate change. To accomplish this, GNSS meteorology uses a combination of GNSS signals and GNSS permanent reference stations. The lower part of the atmosphere (i.e., troposphere) introduces delays on GNSS signals, which are estimated during the positioning process. The raw data gained from GNSS permanent reference stations is then processed and analysed in order to estimate tropospheric products. With the knowledge of surface pressure and temperature, together with various mapping functions, one can more easily evaluate Zenith Total Delay (ZTD) and Integrated Water Vapour quantity.

Of growing importance

In the future, GNSS and Earth Observation will likely see a growing role in forecasting and fighting climate change. “If you look across the entire chain of weather service development over the course of the past five years, you will see satellite-based technologies becoming increasingly important for global observations, atmospheric modelling, and forecasting/delivering weather information to end users,” says des Dorides.

In general, multi-GNSS brings great opportunities for the real-time determination of tropospheric zenith total delays and integrated water vapour, thus improving numerical weather prediction, particularly for now-casting and severe weather monitoring. As a result, multi-GNSS processing will improve the accuracy of tropospheric products due to an increased number of observations and improved coverage of azimuth and elevation angles.

“GNSS is particularly well-positioned to provide more localised and instantaneous weather services, as weather observing networks that use GNSS are able to produce much more accurate weather data than what is available using conventional fixed network methods,” adds des Dorides.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

As the effects of climate change continue to impact our day-to-day lives, European GNSS will play an increasing role in meteorology and weather forecasting.

Japan joins the GNSS table with QZSS

6.9.2017 14:21  
Published: 
06 September 2017

The Japanese government forecasts that 80% of the economic effects from QZSS will be in the car navigation, mobile terminal and value-added mobility application segments. The upcoming 2020 Tokyo Olympics will also give precise positioning and timing solutions an added boost. This instalment of our GNSS Asia series looks at Japan’s evolving QZSS system and the many benefits it is set to bring.

Japan’s own RNSS (Radio Navigation Satellite System) system, called QZSS, is set to become operational next year. Currently an SBAS system (like EGNOS), there are plans to extend it into an independent regional navigation system. As such, it is set to drive demand in submeter -class applications for receiver manufacturers, system integrators and application developers.

As QZSS is planned to enable better signal reception in urban areas, thanks to the availability of more satellites in general over Japan, the country will benefit from increased accuracy and continuity – essential for position-based applications. According to estimates provided by the Japanese government, 80% of the economic effects created by QZSS are forecasted to take place in the car navigation, mobile terminals and value-added mobility application segments. Furthermore, the upcoming 2020 Tokyo Olympics will give precise positioning and timing solutions an added boost.

A dramatic advancement

As more and more services rely on satellite positioning, there is a greater need for additional satellites in the sky. In Japan, like elsewhere, car navigation systems and smartphones have utilised the position services of GPS satellites. However, due to the limited number of GPS satellites in the field of vision for Japanese users at any given time, services have not always been offered in a stable way. This is already improving as new constellations, such as Galileo, also cover Japanese territory.

For this reason, the Japanese government decided to launch their own RNSS service. QZSS, like EGNOS and Galileo, is interoperable with GPS and can be utilised with other GNSS in an integrated fashion. The result will be a dramatic advancement of satellite positioning services, not only in Japan, but across the Asia-Oceania regions with longitudes close to Japan.   

QZSS will launch as a four-satellite constellation as of 2018. When added together with GPS and Galileo the entire system will provide eight or more visible satellites covering most of Japan at all times – an ideal number for carrying out stable, high precision positioning. Knowing that even with eight visible satellites signals are often obstructed in urban areas and mountainous regions, QZSS plans to increase its number of satellites to seven in the near future.

Benefiting users

When providing navigation services to pedestrians, it is necessary that a service convey detailed information about roads, including which side they should walk on and which pedestrian crossings to use. Thanks to the stable, high precision positioning that will be provided by QZSS, users will soon benefit from the detailed information they need to select the route that best matches their navigation goals. This includes routes that help them reach their destination fastest, routes with many pedestrian arcades, routes with few stairs and even how to take ‘the scenic route’.

QZSS will also be capable of sending reports for disasters and crisis management, such as during an earthquake or tsunami. Disaster Crisis (DC) Report, the QZSS safety confirmation service, will send emails via satellite to close relatives if other means of communication are cut off during a disaster.

  

New Cooperation Arrangement

To ensure Japan benefits from European GNSS know-how and that European businesses can benefit from the GNSS developments happening in Japan, a Cooperation Arrangement was recently signed between the Government of Japan and the European Commission.

The Cooperation Agreement aims to enhance EU-Japan policy cooperation in order to prioritise industrial sectors for utilising satellite positioning and creating new business services. The announcement was made during the annual EU-Japan GNSS mission. One of the hot topics discussed during the mission was the upcoming 2020 Tokyo Olympics, with the European team sharing how the 2012 London games benefited from GNSS applications and how the Tokyo games could similarly benefit.

  

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

To ensure that Japan benefits from European GNSS know-how and that European businesses can benefit from the GNSS developments happening in Japan, a Cooperation Agreement was recently signed between the Government of Japan and the EC. ©stevendiazphoto

Japan joins the GNSS table with QZSS

6.9.2017 14:21  
Published: 
06 September 2017

The Japanese government forecasts that 80% of the economic effects from QZSS will be in the car navigation, mobile terminal and value-added mobility application segments. The upcoming 2020 Tokyo Olympics will also give precise positioning and timing solutions an added boost. This instalment of our GNSS Asia series looks at Japan’s evolving QZSS system and the many benefits it is set to bring.

Japan’s own RNSS (Radio Navigation Satellite System) system, called QZSS, is set to become operational next year. Currently an SBAS system (like EGNOS), there are plans to extend it into an independent regional navigation system. As such, it is set to drive demand in submeter -class applications for receiver manufacturers, system integrators and application developers.

As QZSS is planned to enable better signal reception in urban areas, thanks to the availability of more satellites in general over Japan, the country will benefit from increased accuracy and continuity – essential for position-based applications. According to estimates provided by the Japanese government, 80% of the economic effects created by QZSS are forecasted to take place in the car navigation, mobile terminals and value-added mobility application segments. Furthermore, the upcoming 2020 Tokyo Olympics will give precise positioning and timing solutions an added boost.

A dramatic advancement

As more and more services rely on satellite positioning, there is a greater need for additional satellites in the sky. In Japan, like elsewhere, car navigation systems and smartphones have utilised the position services of GPS satellites. However, due to the limited number of GPS satellites in the field of vision for Japanese users at any given time, services have not always been offered in a stable way. This is already improving as new constellations, such as Galileo, also cover Japanese territory.

For this reason, the Japanese government decided to launch their own RNSS service. QZSS, like EGNOS and Galileo, is interoperable with GPS and can be utilised with other GNSS in an integrated fashion. The result will be a dramatic advancement of satellite positioning services, not only in Japan, but across the Asia-Oceania regions with longitudes close to Japan.   

QZSS will launch as a four-satellite constellation as of 2018. When added together with GPS and Galileo the entire system will provide eight or more visible satellites covering most of Japan at all times – an ideal number for carrying out stable, high precision positioning. Knowing that even with eight visible satellites signals are often obstructed in urban areas and mountainous regions, QZSS plans to increase its number of satellites to seven in the near future.

Benefiting users

When providing navigation services to pedestrians, it is necessary that a service convey detailed information about roads, including which side they should walk on and which pedestrian crossings to use. Thanks to the stable, high precision positioning that will be provided by QZSS, users will soon benefit from the detailed information they need to select the route that best matches their navigation goals. This includes routes that help them reach their destination fastest, routes with many pedestrian arcades, routes with few stairs and even how to take ‘the scenic route’.

QZSS will also be capable of sending reports for disasters and crisis management, such as during an earthquake or tsunami. Disaster Crisis (DC) Report, the QZSS safety confirmation service, will send emails via satellite to close relatives if other means of communication are cut off during a disaster.

  

New Cooperation Arrangement

To ensure Japan benefits from European GNSS know-how and that European businesses can benefit from the GNSS developments happening in Japan, a Cooperation Arrangement was recently signed between the Government of Japan and the European Commission.

The Cooperation Agreement aims to enhance EU-Japan policy cooperation in order to prioritise industrial sectors for utilising satellite positioning and creating new business services. The announcement was made during the annual EU-Japan GNSS mission. One of the hot topics discussed during the mission was the upcoming 2020 Tokyo Olympics, with the European team sharing how the 2012 London games benefited from GNSS applications and how the Tokyo games could similarly benefit.

  

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

©stevendiazphoto

Opportunities abound in Taiwan

24.8.2017 10:31  
GNSS.asia in Taiwan has built a good network with key Taiwanese counterparts from both the public and private sectors.
Published: 
24 August 2017

In recent years, Taiwan has emerged as a world-leading GNSS receiver and chipset manufacturer. In fact, Taiwan-based Mediatek is now positioned as one of the top 3 mobile chipset manufacturers and the country is also home to leading OEMs for LBS and automotive navigation equipment.

The GSA-funded GNSS.asia project is dedicated to developing and implementing GNSS industrial cooperation between European and Asia-Pacific GNSS industries, with a focus on the downstream market and has been actively working with Taiwanese stakeholders, including Mediatek.

“GNSS.asia in Taiwan has built a good network with key Taiwanese counterparts from both the public and private sectors,” says European Chamber of Commerce in Taiwan EU Programme & Technology Committee Assistant Director Angela Hsiao. “Our team has significant knowledge about the international and national policy frameworks relevant to industrial cooperation and high-tech businesses.” According to Hsiao, GNSS.asia is working closely with the governmental agencies under Taiwan’s Ministry of Transportation and Communications (MOTC) and Ministry of Economic Affairs (MOEA), as well as key industrial associations and research institutions operating in various GNSS fields. 

Multiple opportunities 

Unlike its neighbouring countries, Taiwan is not developing its own GNSS system. Instead, it has positioned itself as an ideal testbed for multi-GNSS applications and services. “The size of Taiwan’s population, the plethora of tall buildings in Taipei and the variety of geographical characteristics of the island provide diverse challenges for GNSS applications to innovate solutions to,” explains Hsiao. “Key technologies, including smart transportation, telematics, autonomous driving, disaster prevention and search and rescue, all of which require GNSS applications, are being developed here in Taiwan.” 

Clearly, multi-GNSS is an essential opportunity that Taiwan wants to pursue. “Taiwan, which has a limited domestic market, has done an excellent job at positioning itself in the global high-tech industry,” says Hsiao. “As a result, it is now home to some of the largest chip manufacturers and semiconductor board integrators.” 

Other areas of interest to both Taiwan and the EU are car communications, the Internet of Things (IoT) and sensor fusion. “In Taiwan, the shift from a focus on computers to mobile devices has resulted in a steady decline in computer and related industries, such as display, power and memory,” says Hsiao. “However, the advance of digitisation is bringing new opportunities that are re-inventing the landscape of information technology.” 

Hsiao notes that although this transition will take time, progress is already being seen in the IoT, car communications and robotics sectors. “The evolution has in any case started and has been made possible by the availability of sensors in large volumes at low cost, by the continuous progress of Taiwan’s connectivity and by the power of computation that is brought about by faster and lower power micro-controllers,” she says. 

An ICT powerhouse

In just 30 years, Taiwan has become a strategic player in the design, testing and manufacturing of ICT products. This achievement was made possible because of a successful combination of public and private commitment to ensuring a high level of R&D spending, the strong entrepreneurial drive of Taiwanese businesspeople and an innovative business and industrial ecosystem. 

As a result, today ICT is another important field for R&D cooperation between European and Taiwanese entities, with many new areas of cooperation quickly emerging. For example, since the micro- and nano-electronics sectors were identified as major fields of joint interest in 2015, a series of novel and disruptive technologies aiming to address new applications and market segments (such as ICT for healthcare and robotics) have emerged. “Major trends such as IoT and Wearable Technologies are also driving innovation worldwide, and should be considered as major triggers to mobilise all players in Taiwan, both from the public and private sectors, to look for collaboration with Europe,” says Hsiao. 

Keeping the momentum going

Looking ahead, Hsiao sees car communications, IoT, autonomous driving, disaster prevention, search and rescue and healthcare services as the key future trends in the Taiwan market where GNSS applications can play an important role. “Future GNSS.asia activities in Taiwan will keep the momentum going, gathering key partners from the public and private sectors to share best practices on innovating GNSS applications,” she says. “As this happens, the GNSS.asia Taiwan team will continue to support industrial relations between the EU and Taiwan and facilitate EGNSS breakthroughs via effective and efficient communication.”

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

GNSS.asia in Taiwan has built a good network with key Taiwanese counterparts from both the public and private sectors.

Ample opportunities in Korea

22.8.2017 11:58  
To ensure European industry is able to take full advantage of these opportunities, the GNSS.asia Korea team is on the ground working with companies and collaborating with organisations.
Published: 
22 August 2017

Considering that Korea and the EU are amongst the largest car manufacturing regions in the world, there is immense potential for collaboration in the automotive telematics industry. The commercial vehicle telematics market experienced a growth rate of 5% over the last five years, as Hyundai and KIA increasingly turn to GNSS as an integral part of future Information Technology Services (ITS). 

Korea also has one of the world’s most advanced LBS portfolios, driven by the country’s superior IT infrastructure, commercial based services and favourable regulatory environment. 

Furthermore, the EU-South Korea Free Trade Agreement has eliminated duties for most industrial goods, further enhancing the business environment for European entities. 

Add all of this up and you get ample opportunities in Korea for European GNSS companies. 

Collaboration is key

In the road sector, many Korean automobile manufacturers and their IT/electronic partners are turning to European made chips and devices. The sector is also relying on EU experts for help with certification, testing and implementing – particularly as the country works towards adopting an eCall system of their own. And in the LBS sector, several Korean smartphone and electronic manufacturers are implementing Galileo capability into their devices.

To ensure European industry is able to take full advantage of opportunities like these, the GNSS.asia Korea team is on the ground working with companies and collaborating with organisations. The GSA-funded GNSS.asia project is dedicated to developing and implementing GNSS industrial cooperation between European and Asia-Pacific GNSS industries, with a focus on the downstream market. The initiative is part of the EU-Korea GNSS Cooperation Agreement of 2006.  

For example, the team has a strong partnership with the Institute of Positioning, Navigation and Timing (IPNT) (formerly the Korean GNSS Society (KGS)), an organisation established to stimulate the GNSS field in academia and business. The two meet monthly to discuss national and international multi-GNSS activities and how they can better collaborate to address these issues.

One of the key outcomes of this partnership is an intensive match making programme between European companies and Korean customers and partners. Such companies as NavCert, Syntony F, 3M Systems, Thales, Catapult, Easymile and Enertopia have all benefited from this valuable initiative. GNSS.asia also helps European companies engage with Korean government officials and navigate the complex bureaucratic system. 

Thanks to this close collaboration, several business results have been achieved. For instance, as Korea looks to implement their own eCall system, modelled off the European system, the two partners have successfully positioned the multi-constellation, Galileo-enabled chipset as the standard. They have also actively supported Korea SBAS to adopt European structures and systems – including getting Korea SBAS to choose Thales as their system provider. 

Just getting started

The successes that EU companies are seeing in Korea are testament to the power of collaboration – and this is only the tip of the iceberg. “As the multi-GNSS initiatives in Korea continue to mature, we will see more and more opportunities for European businesses, particularly in the areas of Korea SBAS, eCall and eLoran,” says GNSS.asia Managing Director Hyemi Hwang. “And we’re just getting started.”

According to Hwang, in order to implement Korea SBAS, the Korean government and industry have a preference for European technology and applications. “This is why they ultimately chose to partner with Thales,” she says. “The Korean government is confident that this partnership will result in the introduction and implementation of massive, real-life applications in the area of autonomous driving, maritime security and safety, and LBS-based drones for security, agriculture, logistics, mapping, and media/entertainment.” Hwang adds that the Korean government is also leveraging EGNOS and European applications to help make their aviation sector more efficient. 

Likewise, as the country works towards implementing eCall, it regularly refers to the European system as the standard and is constantly on the lookout for chances to collaborate more closely. “European companies should look to Korean partners in order to take full advantage of this unique business opportunity,” adds Hwang. “To get started, all you have to do is contact your GNSS.asia team here in Korea.”

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

To ensure European industry is able to take full advantage of these opportunities, the GNSS.asia Korea team is on the ground working with companies and collaborating with organisations.

Invitation to Tender: EGNOS High Accuracy service analysis

14.8.2017 9:29  
Published: 
14 August 2017

EGNOS, Europe’s regional satellite-based augmentation system (SBAS), improves the accuracy and reliability of GPS positioning information, while also providing a crucial integrity message regarding the continuity and availability of a signal. The European GNSS Agency (GSA) and the European Space Agency (ESA) are currently working on the development of the next generation of EGNOS. When operational, the multi-frequency/multi-constellation EGNOS Version 3 will improve the accuracy and reliability of the positioning information provided not only by GPS, but also Galileo

With its dual-frequency capability, EGNOS V3 will provide Precise Point Positioning (PPP), or positioning at the centimetre to decimetre level. The availability of PPP techniques creates an opportunity for EGNOS to deliver high accuracy positioning to a range of application types, including agriculture, road, mapping/surveying, construction, offshore mining and maritime – among others. 

Invitation to Tender

An EGNOS High Accuracy (HA) service has the potential to provide users with centimetre level accuracy, a fast convergence time and timely warning of any compromise to the integrity of the positioning service. To better understand user needs for such a service, the European Commission, Directorate-General for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs (DG GROWTH), has published an Invitation to Tender (ITT). The objective of the ITT is to determine under what condition(s) it would be beneficial to implement an EGNOS HA service within the 2020-2035 timeframe.    

The analysis is to focus on identifying user requirements and on the EGNOS service provision, bearing in mind the foreseen availability of a Galileo Commercial Service. The ITT does not cover the technical implementation of the service at the system level. 

The study will be fully financed by the European Commission under the Horizon 2020 framework programme for research and innovation, within the budget allocated to the evolution of the EGNOS mission. The European Commission has charged the GSA with the technical supervision of the project.

More information about the ITT can be found here.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The availability of PPP techniques creates an opportunity for EGNOS to deliver high accuracy positioning to mapping/surveying and construction sectors.

Beyond Cat-I: EGNOS evolution for aviation safety

11.8.2017 10:14  
Published: 
10 August 2017

EGNOS has revolutionised the way Europe flies. As an alternative to ground-based Instrument Landing Systems (ILS), EGNOS utilises geostationary satellites and a network of ground stations to receive, analyse and augment GPS signals. The resulting EGNOS LPV 200 service provides vertical guidance that enables aircraft to reach a decision height as low as 200 feet – a capability similar to what is provided via ILS Cat-I but without the financial burden of installing, maintaining and calibrating ground equipment.

Although this accomplishment is impressive as is, EGNOS is just getting started. 

EGNOS Version 3, set to enter service in the near future, will augment both GPS and Galileo. As a result, it will be capable of delivering performance beyond Cat-I requirements. Not only will this capability increase performance and improve accuracy, resilience and safety, it will also enable the aviation sector to design new EGNOS-based services and applications.  

To help user in this next generation of EGNOS, the European Commission, Directorate-General for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs (DG GROWTH) is set to publish a call for a new service contract. The scope of the contract includes:

  • Analysing aviation needs and identifying opportunities for new services that go beyond Cat-I and are enabled by EGNOS’ dual frequency augmentation of GPS and Galileo;
  • Identifying user needs, such as an evolution towards Cat-II approach procedures, or new services, all within the framework of a future integrated communication, navigation and surveillance (iCNS) system;
  • Analysing  potential service improvements versus existing services;
  • Assessing safety requirements and their potential impact on both EGNOS and aviation user receivers;
  • Reviewing service provision constraints. 

The estimated date of publication for the contract notice is 15 August 2017. More information can be found in the Prior Information Notice (PIN). 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

With EGNOS Version 3 augmenting Galileo, it will be capable of delivering performance beyond Cat-I requirements.

Beyond Cat-I: EGNOS evolution for aviation safety

11.8.2017 10:14  
Published: 
10 August 2017

EGNOS has revolutionised the way Europe flies. As an alternative to ground-based Instrument Landing Systems (ILS), EGNOS utilises geostationary satellites and a network of ground stations to receive, analyse and augment GPS signals. The resulting EGNOS LPV 200 service provides vertical guidance that enables aircraft to reach a decision height as low as 200 feet – a capability similar to what is provided via ILS Cat-I but without the financial burden of installing, maintaining and calibrating ground equipment.

Although this accomplishment is impressive as is, EGNOS is just getting started. 

EGNOS Version 3, set to enter service in the near future, will augment both GPS and Galileo. As a result, it will be capable of delivering performance beyond Cat-I requirements. Not only will this capability increase performance and improve accuracy, resilience and safety, it will also enable the aviation sector to design new EGNOS-based services and applications.  

To help user in this next generation of EGNOS, the European Commission, Directorate-General for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs (DG GROWTH) is set to publish a call for a new service contract. The scope of the contract includes:

  • Analysing aviation needs and identifying opportunities for new services that go beyond Cat-I and are enabled by EGNOS’ dual frequency augmentation of GPS and Galileo;
  • Identifying user needs, such as an evolution towards Cat-II approach procedures, or new services, all within the framework of a future integrated communication, navigation and surveillance (iCNS) system;
  • Analysing  potential service improvements versus existing services;
  • Assessing safety requirements and their potential impact on both EGNOS and aviation user receivers;
  • Reviewing service provision constraints. 

The contract notice will be published in the near future. More information can be found in the Prior Information Notice (PIN). 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

With EGNOS Version 3 augmenting Galileo, it will be capable of delivering performance beyond Cat-I requirements.

Beyond Cat-I: EGNOS evolution for aviation safety

11.8.2017 10:14  
Published: 
11 August 2017

EGNOS has revolutionised the way Europe flies. As an alternative to ground-based Instrument Landing Systems (ILS), EGNOS utilises geostationary satellites and a network of ground stations to receive, analyse and augment GPS signals. The resulting EGNOS LPV 200 service provides vertical guidance that enables aircraft to reach a decision height as low as 200 feet – a capability similar to what is provided via ILS Cat-I but without the financial burden of installing, maintaining and calibrating ground equipment.

Although this accomplishment is impressive as is, EGNOS is just getting started. 

EGNOS Version 3, set to enter service in the near future, will augment both GPS and Galileo. As a result, it will be capable of delivering performance beyond Cat-I requirements. Not only will this capability increase performance and improve accuracy, resilience and safety, it will also enable the aviation sector to design new EGNOS-based services and applications.  

To help usher in this next generation of EGNOS, the European Commission, Directorate-General for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs (DG GROWTH) is set to publish a call for a new service contract. The scope of the contract includes:

  • Analysing aviation needs and identifying opportunities for new services that go beyond Cat-I and are enabled by EGNOS’ dual frequency augmentation of GPS and Galileo;
  • Identifying user needs, such as an evolution towards Cat-II approach procedures, or new services, all within the framework of a future integrated communication, navigation and surveillance (iCNS) system;
  • Analysing  potential service improvements versus existing services;
  • Assessing safety requirements and their potential impact on both EGNOS and aviation user receivers;
  • Reviewing service provision constraints. 

The estimated date of publication for the contract notice is 15 August 2017. More information can be found in the Prior Information Notice (PIN). 

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

With EGNOS Version 3 augmenting Galileo, it will be capable of delivering performance beyond Cat-I requirements.

Two more satellites join Galileo service provision

8.8.2017 13:44  
Published: 
10 August 2017

The European GNSS Agency (GSA), along with the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC), announce the commissioning of two additional satellites, bringing the total number of satellites available for the Galileo service provision to 18.

The GSA is pleased to announce the completion of in-orbit testing (IOT) of two new Galileo satellites, GSAT0212-SV ID 03- and GSAT0213-SV ID 04 -. Having passed all initial tests, the two satellites are now officially commissioned for operational use and are usable for the Galileo service provision (see NAGU 2017029 and NAGU 2017032).

The satellites join GSAT0207-SV ID 07- and GSAT02014-SV ID -5 -, which were previously commissioned on 30 May 2017, increasing the total number of satellites available for use with the Galileo service provision to 18. All four satellites were launched on 17 November 2016 from Kourou, French Guiana – the first launch using an Ariane-5 rocket.

Four additional satellites are expected to be launched in the coming months, further enlarging the Galileo constellation and improving its global performance. Launches will continue until the system reaches Full Operational Capability in 2020. The complete constellation will consist of 30 satellites in orbit (24 operational and six spares). 

About Galileo

Galileo is Europe's civilian global satellite navigation system. It allows users worldwide to know their exact position in time and space with great precision and reliability.

Once fully operational, Galileo will offer four high-performance services worldwide:

  • Open Service (OS): open and free of charge service set up for positioning and timing services.
  • Commercial Service (CS): a service complementing the OS by providing an additional navigation signal and added-value services in a different frequency band. The CS signal can be encrypted in order to control access to the Galileo CS services.
  • Public Regulated Service (PRS): service restricted to government-authorised users, for sensitive applications that require a high level of service continuity.
  • Search and Rescue Service (SAR): Europe’s contribution to COSPAS-SARSAT, an international satellite-based search and rescue distress alert detection system.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The commissioning of two new satellites reinforces Galileo service provision.

Two more satellites join Galileo service provision

8.8.2017 13:44  
Published: 
10 August 2017

The European GNSS Agency (GSA), along with the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC), announce the commissioning of two additional satellites, bringing the total number of satellites available for the Galileo service provision to 18.

The GSA is pleased to announce the completion of in-orbit testing (IOT) of two new Galileo satellites, GSAT0212-SV ID 03- and GSAT0213-SV ID 04 -. Having passed all initial tests, the two satellites are now officially commissioned for operational use and are usable for the Galileo service provision (see NAGU 2017029 and NAGU 2017033).

The satellites join GSAT0207-SV ID 07- and GSAT02014-SV ID -5 -, which were previously commissioned on 30 May 2017, increasing the total number of satellites available for use with the Galileo service provision to 18. All four satellites were launched on 17 November 2016 from Kourou, French Guiana – the first launch using an Ariane-5 rocket.

Four additional satellites are expected to be launched in the coming months, further enlarging the Galileo constellation and improving its global performance. Launches will continue until the system reaches Full Operational Capability in 2020. The complete constellation will consist of 30 satellites in orbit (24 operational and six spares). 

About Galileo

Galileo is Europe's civilian global satellite navigation system. It allows users worldwide to know their exact position in time and space with great precision and reliability.

Once fully operational, Galileo will offer four high-performance services worldwide:

  • Open Service (OS): open and free of charge service set up for positioning and timing services.
  • Commercial Service (CS): a service complementing the OS by providing an additional navigation signal and added-value services in a different frequency band. The CS signal can be encrypted in order to control access to the Galileo CS services.
  • Public Regulated Service (PRS): service restricted to government-authorised users, for sensitive applications that require a high level of service continuity.
  • Search and Rescue Service (SAR): Europe’s contribution to COSPAS-SARSAT, an international satellite-based search and rescue distress alert detection system.

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

The commissioning of two new satellites reinforces Galileo service provision.

EU-China cooperation on GNSS gains momentum

4.8.2017 10:29  
Published: 
07 August 2017

In this instalment of our GNSS in Asia series, we look at how the close cooperation between the GNSS.asia China team and China’s LBS association is resulting in big opportunities for EU companies.

With an explosive annual growth rate forecast at 46% up to 2020, the Chinese Location-Based Services (LBS) market is a huge and relatively accessible market for European players. Although the gaming and marketing segments are the most promising for cooperating with Chinese partners, chipset manufacturers like ST and Bosch are also seeing success.

More so, since 2016 bike-sharing has boomed in China, which thrives on the use of GNSS-provided positioning and thus is positioned as a key opportunity for EU players. As reported by Forbes in a July 2017 article, Beijing-based bike-sharing start-up ofo, recently received $700 million in financing to expand its network of inexpensive and environmentally friendly bike shares that rely on mobile apps for renting and GPS for tracking. Likewise, Mobike, a close competitor, drew $600 million in financing in June, bringing its total for the year up to $1 billion.

Spearheading the development of China’s LBS market is the GNSS and LBS Association of China (GLAC). Founded in 1995, GLAC is a professional non-profit organisation focused on GNSS applications and LBS services at the national level. The association boasts more than 2,000 members, including universities, research institutes, enterprises, manufacturers and geospatial data providers – to name only a few.

GLAC works in close partnership with the GNSS.asia China team, looking for opportunities to bring LBS players from Europe and China together. Specifically, the partnership is responsible for organising a range of events targeting the GNSS community in China and Europe and working to raise awareness about Europe’s GNSS programmes (EGNOS and Galileo) throughout GLAC’s extensive industry network. The GSA-funded GNSS.asia project is dedicated to developing and implementing GNSS industrial cooperation between European and Asia-Pacific GNSS industries, with a focus on the downstream market.

“Over the past several years, we have taken great strides to capitalise on GLAC’s extensive industry network as a means of facilitating cooperation agreements between Asian and European companies,” says Davof Xu, EU SME Advocacy and Working Group Coordinator at the EU Chamber of Commerce in China.

Spreading the word on E-GNSS

To promote E-GNSS and industrial cooperation to a broader extent across China, GNSS.asia, along with GLAC, have been ‘testing the waters’ for interest in China’s top GNSS cities. For example, last year they organised the International Forum on GNSS & LBS and the 11th China Satellite Navigation Operations Conference in Shenzhen, which welcomed over 50 participants. The two also partnered to host the International Forum on GNSS Applications – GNSS Connects the World at the 5th Annual GLAC Conference in Chengdu.

“These events were successful in that they allowed us to identify possible local partners and stakeholders that we need to facilitate concrete cooperation in the regions,” says Xu. “What’s very encouraging is that many of the attendees were open to the possibility of industrial cooperation between Europe and China, especially as it pertains to applications.”

GNSS.asia also attended the Beidou + Space-based Information Application Summit, which was organised by GLAC and held in Harbin.

Looking ahead

To continue to build on this momentum between China and the EU, the GNSS.asia China team plans to expand its cooperation with both GLAC and GCE. They are also helping to organise GLAC’s EU tour and facilitate the creation of concrete industrial partnerships. In April 2017, for example, a mutual meeting between GLAC and the GNSS Centre of Excellence (GCE) was held in Prague with around 20 participants. “Here, both sides agreed to further strengthen cooperation and exchanges on creating new transportation-focused applications, especially for the ITS, Road and Aviation sectors,” says Xu.

The GNSS.asia China team is also busy coordinating opportunities for industrial exchanges and matchmaking through GLAC’s Action Plan of Hundreds of Cities, Hundreds of Applications. The Plan aims to promote GNSS technology and applications, as well as the development of satellite navigation and location services industries, through the integration of regional and industry location networks.

“The Plan promotes GNSS applications across multiple industries, field and cities,” explains Xu. “Of particular interest to European companies is the Plan’s focus on vehicle navigation and positioning related services, along with applications pertaining to the urban construction and management, mapping, and maritime sectors.”

Multi-constellation goes mainstream

With the launch Galileo Initial Services, GNSS.asia is closely following its adoption among GLAC’s networks. According to Xu, Chinese chipset companies like CEC Huada Electronical Design Co. Ltd, Unicore Communications Inc., and Mengxin Technology have all developed Galileo-enabled chipsets. Furthermore, some Chinese mobile phone manufactures, including Huawei, have started using Galileo-enabled chipsets within their devices.

“As multi-constellation is now the mainstream, Chinese companies are becoming increasingly interested in including Galileo into their applications and devices in order to provide better accuracy for their customers,” says Xu. He adds that this is especially true as Chinese companies become more internationalised and expand into overseas markets. “It is not difficult to find examples of Chinese GNSS companies acquiring international companies,” adds Xu. “For instance, Unistrong acquired Hemisphere in 2015, and the technology has been well promoted in the Chinese market since then.”

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

As multi-constellation is the mainstream, Chinese companies are becoming increasingly interested in including Galileo into their applications and devices

EU-China cooperation on GNSS gains momentum

4.8.2017 10:29  
EU-China cooperation on GNSS gains momentum
Published: 
07 August 2017

In this instalment of our GNSS in Asia series, we look at how the close cooperation between the GNSS.asia China team and China’s LBS association is resulting in big opportunities for EU companies.

With an explosive annual growth rate forecast at 46% up to 2020, the Chinese Location-Based Services (LBS) market is a huge and relatively accessible market for European players. Although the gaming and marketing segments are the most promising for cooperating with Chinese partners, chipset manufacturers like ST and Bosch are also seeing success.

More so, since 2016 bike-sharing has boomed in China, which thrives on the use of GNSS-provided positioning and thus is positioned as a key opportunity for EU players. As reported by Forbes in a July 2017 article, Beijing-based bike-sharing start-up ofo, recently received $700 million in financing to expand its network of inexpensive and environmentally friendly bike shares that rely on mobile apps for renting and GPS for tracking. Likewise, Mobike, a close competitor, drew $600 million in financing in June, bringing its total for the year up to $1 billion.

Spearheading the development of China’s LBS market is the GNSS and LBS Association of China (GLAC). Founded in 1995, GLAC is a professional non-profit organisation focused on GNSS applications and LBS services at the national level. The association boasts more than 2,000 members, including universities, research institutes, enterprises, manufacturers and geospatial data providers – to name only a few.

GLAC works in close partnership with the GNSS.asia China team, looking for opportunities to bring LBS players from Europe and China together. Specifically, the partnership is responsible for organising a range of events targeting the GNSS community in China and Europe and working to raise awareness about Europe’s GNSS programmes (EGNOS and Galileo) throughout GLAC’s extensive industry network. The GSA-funded GNSS.asia project is dedicated to developing and implementing GNSS industrial cooperation between European and Asia-Pacific GNSS industries, with a focus on the downstream market.

“Over the past several years, we have taken great strides to capitalise on GLAC’s extensive industry network as a means of facilitating cooperation agreements between Asian and European companies,” says Davof Xu, EU SME Advocacy and Working Group Coordinator at the EU Chamber of Commerce in China.

Spreading the word on E-GNSS

To promote E-GNSS and industrial cooperation to a broader extent across China, GNSS.asia, along with GLAC, have been ‘testing the waters’ for interest in China’s top GNSS cities. For example, last year they organised the International Forum on GNSS & LBS and the 11th China Satellite Navigation Operations Conference in Shenzhen, which welcomed over 50 participants. The two also partnered to host the International Forum on GNSS Applications – GNSS Connects the World at the 5th Annual GLAC Conference in Chengdu.

“These events were successful in that they allowed us to identify possible local partners and stakeholders that we need to facilitate concrete cooperation in the regions,” says Xu. “What’s very encouraging is that many of the attendees were open to the possibility of industrial cooperation between Europe and China, especially as it pertains to applications.”

GNSS.asia also attended the Beidou + Space-based Information Application Summit, which was organised by GLAC and held in Harbin.

Looking ahead

To continue to build on this momentum between China and the EU, the GNSS.asia China team plans to expand its cooperation with both GLAC and GCE. They are also helping to organise GLAC’s EU tour and facilitate the creation of concrete industrial partnerships. In April 2017, for example, a mutual meeting between GLAC and the GNSS Centre of Excellence (GCE) was held in Prague with around 20 participants. “Here, both sides agreed to further strengthen cooperation and exchanges on creating new transportation-focused applications, especially for the ITS, Road and Aviation sectors,” says Xu.

The GNSS.asia China team is also busy coordinating opportunities for industrial exchanges and matchmaking through GLAC’s Action Plan of Hundreds of Cities, Hundreds of Applications. The Plan aims to promote GNSS technology and applications, as well as the development of satellite navigation and location services industries, through the integration of regional and industry location networks.

“The Plan promotes GNSS applications across multiple industries, field and cities,” explains Xu. “Of particular interest to European companies is the Plan’s focus on vehicle navigation and positioning related services, along with applications pertaining to the urban construction and management, mapping, and maritime sectors.”

Multi-constellation goes mainstream

With the launch Galileo Initial Services, GNSS.asia is closely following its adoption among GLAC’s networks. According to Xu, Chinese chipset companies like CEC Huada Electronical Design Co. Ltd, Unicore Communications Inc., and Mengxin Technology have all developed Galileo-enabled chipsets. Furthermore, some Chinese mobile phone manufactures, including Huawei, have started using Galileo-enabled chipsets within their devices.

“As multi-constellation is now the mainstream, Chinese companies are becoming increasingly interested in including Galileo into their applications and devices in order to provide better accuracy for their customers,” says Xu. He adds that this is especially true as Chinese companies become more internationalised and expand into overseas markets. “It is not difficult to find examples of Chinese GNSS companies acquiring international companies,” adds Xu. “For instance, Unistrong acquired Hemisphere in 2015, and the technology has been well promoted in the Chinese market since then.”

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

As multi-constellation is the mainstream, Chinese companies are becoming increasingly interested in including Galileo into their applications and devices

The synergies between GNSS and Earth Observation

3.8.2017 8:54  
Published: 
03 August 2017

Speaking at a dedicated session entitled ‘Applications: Earth Sciences and Geo-Information’, part of EUREF’s annual symposium, representatives of the mapping and surveying sector discussed the various synergies between GNSS and Earth Observation and their use for providing real-time information about the state of the Earth’s troposphere.

EUREF, the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) Reference Frame Sub-Commission for Europe, is dedicated to the definition, realisation and maintenance of the European Geodetic Reference Systems. Included in this mission is the development and maintenance of the EUREF GNSS Permanent Network (EPN), which is a ground-based GNSS infrastructure for scientific and practical applications in positioning and navigation. EUREF provides standards and guidelines to European National Mapping Authorities in order to harmonise the definition and adoption of national coordinate reference systems.

“Geodetic techniques measure the situation on the earth’s surface, and modern space technologies extend these observations to orbiting satellites,” says Professor Alessandro Caporali of Italy’s University of Padova. “As a result, today the position of particular sites on the earth’s surface and its variation is known to the sub-millimetre level for the period of decades.” He also explains how these techniques are sensitive to many occurrences within the earth’s system, including changes in atmosphere, movement of tectonic plates and the state of solar radiation. 

Professor Caporali is working with EUREF in establishing a European system of latitude and longitude via GNSS-based techniques. Temporal changes of these coordinates, of the order of few mm per year, are used to understand the motions taking place on the earth’s surface. To do this, the organisation has established a range of GNSS ground stations to compute coordinates. Previously, these stations relied on GPS and GLONASS, but are now also incorporating Galileo signals – an effort that they are collaborating with the GSA on.

GNSS data integrates well

Areas where GNSS stations move towards each other are recognised by a decreasing relative distance and indicate a compression of the upper Earth crust. Likewise, areas of extensional or shear stress can be identified by analysing the relative displacements in time of GNSS stations at scales of some tens to one hundred km. This deformation measured at the surface is directly linked to deformation at depth, inferred from seismograms whenever an earthquake occurs, or by field surveys and geological mapping. For earthquakes of a magnitude greater than six, GNSS sites exhibit coordinate changes of several centimetres, depending on their distance from the hypocentre.

“The seismic displacement of GNSS sites is very helpful in constraining the coordinates of the hypocentre and other parameters of the causative fault,” says Professor Caporali. “GNSS data integrates very well with data provided by InSAR satellites, such as the recent Sentinel satellites, which are very sensitive to the vertical deformation.”

Important Galileo contribution

The propagation of microwaves from the GNSS satellites to an Earth-based receiver is affected by the electronic content in the ionosphere and by the pressure, temperature and humidity of the troposphere. Hence, an added value of the GNSS data is the direct measurement of the free electrons in the ionosphere, which is directly related to the solar activity and has profound impacts on everyday life (e.g. radio communications). “In the past, ionosphere sounding radars from a limited number of dedicated and expensive installations were used,” adds Caproali. “Now, low cost GNSS receivers with dual frequency capability make this research much cheaper and more detailed.”

“Galileo’s contribution is extremely important and fits well into our objectives, particularly as to the need for precise positioning” concludes Caporali. “I look forward to further close cooperation with the GSA.”

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Synergies between GNSS and Earth Observation provide real-time information about the state of the Earth’s troposphere

The synergies between GNSS and Earth Observation

3.8.2017 8:54  
Published: 
03 August 2017

Speaking at a dedicated session entitled ‘Applications: Earth Sciences and Geo-Information’, part of EUREF’s annual symposium, representatives of the mapping and surveying sector discussed the various synergies between GNSS and Earth Observation and their use for providing real-time information about the state of the Earth’s troposphere.

EUREF, the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) Reference Frame Sub-Commission for Europe, is dedicated to the definition, realisation and maintenance of the European Geodetic Reference Systems. Included in this mission is the development and maintenance of the EUREF GNSS Permanent Network (EPN), which is a ground-based GNSS infrastructure for scientific and practical applications in positioning and navigation. EUREF provides standards and guidelines to European National Mapping Authorities in order to harmonise the definition and adoption of national coordinate reference systems.

“Geodetic techniques measure the situation on the earth’s surface, and modern space technologies extend these observations to orbiting satellites,” says Professor Alessandro Caporali of Italy’s University of Padova. “As a result, today the position of particular sites on the earth’s surface and its variation is known to the sub-millimetre level for the period of decades.” He also explains how these techniques are sensitive to many occurrences within the earth’s system, including changes in atmosphere, movement of tectonic plates and the state of solar radiation. 

Professor Caporali is working with EUREF in establishing a European system of latitude and longitude via GNSS-based techniques. Temporal changes of these coordinates, of the order of few mm per year, are used to understand the motions taking place on the earth’s surface. To do this, the organisation has established a range of GNSS ground stations to compute coordinates. Previously, these stations relied on GPS and GLONASS, but are now also incorporating Galileo signals – an effort that they are collaborating with the GSA on.

GNSS data integrates well

Areas where GNSS stations move towards each other are recognised by a decreasing relative distance and indicate a compression of the upper Earth crust. Likewise, areas of extensional or shear stress can be identified by analysing the relative displacements in time of GNSS stations at scales of some tens to one hundred km. This deformation measured at the surface is directly linked to deformation at depth, inferred from seismograms whenever an earthquake occurs, or by field surveys and geological mapping. For earthquakes of a magnitude greater than six, GNSS sites exhibit coordinate changes of several centimetres, depending on their distance from the hypocentre.

“The seismic displacement of GNSS sites is very helpful in constraining the coordinates of the hypocentre and other parameters of the causative fault,” says Professor Caporali. “GNSS data integrates very well with data provided by InSAR satellites, such as the recent Sentinel satellites, which are very sensitive to the vertical deformation.”

Important Galileo contribution

The propagation of microwaves from the GNSS satellites to an Earth-based receiver is affected by the electronic content in the ionosphere and by the pressure, temperature and humidity of the troposphere. Hence, an added value of the GNSS data is the direct measurement of the free electrons in the ionosphere, which is directly related to the solar activity and has profound impacts on everyday life (e.g. radio communications). “In the past, ionosphere sounding radars from a limited number of dedicated and expensive installations were used,” adds Caporali. “Now, low cost GNSS receivers with dual frequency capability make this research much cheaper and more detailed.”

“Galileo’s contribution is extremely important and fits well into our objectives, particularly as to the need for precise positioning” concludes Caporali. “I look forward to further close cooperation with the GSA.”

Media note: This feature can be republished without charge provided the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is acknowledged as the source at the top or the bottom of the story. You must request permission before you use any of the photographs on the site. If you republish, we would be grateful if you could link back to the GSA website (http://www.gsa.europa.eu).

Synergies between GNSS and Earth Observation provide real-time information about the state of the Earth’s troposphere
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